Zagreb, Croatia

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Zagreb, Croatia

This little Croatian capital has a challenge competing with Croatia’s beautiful Dalmatian Coast cities, its lovely beaches and its magnificent national parks. And yet, this offbeat inland capital has its own charm. It sports a downtown full of cafes and restaurants, decorative spires rising above the rooftops, statues that pop up in unexpected places. Meandering quirky streets carries you among adorable shops that surround the traditional old town. Regal palaces now converted into museums and institutions line the avenues shooting out of the centre. Colours slide off the facades of houses and palaces alike. When the sun is shinning, people stroll down the streets, lounge in the parks and drink a cold, local beer on sidewalk tables. Brides in wedding gowns pose for photo-shoots and students picnic in the grass. Though the beach is far away, and Zagreb is neither as beautiful as Dubrovnik or as historic as Split, it is still well worth the time to stop by this little Balkan capital!

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Bergen, Norway

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Moss-covered trees in Bergen, Norway

Norway is green. No really–it is green. Of its 385,252 square kilometres, most of it is dominated by nature: mountains, glaciers, fjords, forests, and other natural features. The rugged coastlines are jagged with fjords, the largest of which is the Sognefjord not far from Bergen. At 2o4 km, it is the second-longest in the world, and according to the world-renowned magazine, National Geographic, Norway’s fjords are the ‘world’s top tourist destination.’ The part of the country facing the Atlantic Ocean is even greener than the rest of the country as it sees more precipitation and milder winters than the inland bits and the lands far up north. Bergen is Europe’s Seattle in terms of high rainfall percentages. As a result, hiking up any of the mountains that rise behind the city of Bergen–such as Mt. Fløyen–leads you immediately into a green, moss-covered forest. Instead of oozing with fear or unease, the solitude of the forest is quiet and echoing, hugging the solitary traveler as they explore the magic of the winding paths. Not only is this relaxing and curative, it is made easier by Norway’s traditional allemannsretten, or “all mans right of access,” a law that permits everyone the right to the countryside no matter who owns it. Pretty cool, huh?

Prior Park in Bath, England

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The Palladian Bridge in Prior Park, Bath, England

England is a lovely place; Bath is even lovelier. Ancient Roman baths, Gothic abbeys, picturesque canals, charming cobblestones, green parks. Meandering forest trails take you through the grounds of Prior Park and its Palladian house built in the mid-1700s as a way of displaying the use of Bath limestone as a potential building material. The house, as well as this bridge nestled deep into the park’s hillsides, was built following the 16th-century Italian architect Andrea Palladio, whose style briefly became popular in the UK during the mid 17th- through 18th-century before being cut short by the Civil War. Palladio valued lines, symmetry and perspective. Inspired by the Greeks and Romans, he derived a style that adapted the symmetry of Roman temples and palaces to a more modern manor house. Today owned by the Prior Park College and the National Trust, Prior Park is one of Bath’s hidden gems and well worth the countryside stroll!

 

Pont d’Avignon, France

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Pont d’Avignon, France

The famous song “Sur le Pont d’Avignon” (On the Bridge of Avignon) immortalises the Saint Bénézet Bridge or more commonly known as le Pont d’Avignon, today a UNESCO site. In fact – this broken bridge. Because as famous as this bridge is, it can’t actually get you across the Rhone River. The bridge was built because the Ardèche shepherd, Bénézet had a vision that God wanted a bridge here, and when no one believed him, he threw a boulder to convince. Well, in 1185 they built the bridge alright – but apparently either the saint was wrong or God didn’t actually want the bridge because in 1226 it was destroyed by war, and then every century or so it was carried away by the Rhone River. By the 17th century, they gave it up to ruin. As for the 15th century song, it evokes images of townspeople dancing on the bridge – but as you can see, it’s not such a big place for a festival. It’s much more likely that in the original version, they would’ve danced sous or UNDER the bridge!

Sur le Pont d’Avignon
L’on y danse, l’on y danse
Sur le Pont d’Avignon
L’on y danse tous en rond

On the bridge of Avignon
We all dance there, we all dance there
On the bridge of Avignon
We all dance there in a ring


Other bridges in Europe
  1. Tower Bridge in London, England
  2. Millennium Bridge in London, England
  3. Liberty Bridge in Budapest, Hungary
  4. Chain Bridge in Budapest, Hungary
  5. Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic
  6. Pont du Gard in Southern France

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Madrid, Spain

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Madrid, Spain

No matter when you visit Madrid, you are guaranteed sun and heat–even during a sunset such as this. While this makes a nice change from places where it rains or snows often, or others where it is cold most of the year, it can sometimes be too hot. However, the Spanish lifestyle is adapted to work around the heat. Most businesses are closed at midday and this time is instead set aside for eating. In Spain, mealtime is a sacred time of day. Mealtime is for eating, socializing, enjoying life, and you can in no way force a Spaniard to curtail this sacred ‘moment’ (which can sometimes last 3 hours!). Another way to escape the heat is to move everything back a few hours so that dinner is now later, around 10 pm. ‘Afternoon’ activities–like a stroll through the park, a beer at a bar, a quick shopping trip to the mall, dinner on a terrace, etc…this is all done during twilight or even after night falls. While still hot, this at least eliminates too much direct sunlight. Some would even say that twilight is the loveliest time of day!