Lublin, Poland

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Lublin, Poland

Hopefully, everyone out there is pleasantly enjoying the holiday season (snow or no snow…), and looking forward to New Year’s Eve tomorrow. For the (finally!) chilly day, let’s voyage deep into Eastern Europe, to the small city of Lublin, located in eastern Poland about 100 kilometers from  Ukraine. Very different from its western counterparts, Lublin has a long history of changing nationalities, wartime destruction and harsh climate impacts. Far less money has gone into this eastern city as western cities (such as Warsaw, Wroclaw, Poznan, and Gdansk), and it has slowly begun to fall into silent disrepair. However, much like a crumbling ruin long beloved by the 18th- and 19th-centrury artists and poets, Lublin has done so in a gracefully, romantic way. This cold, dreary little town is somehow charming because it IS a cold, dreary little town. In some ways, it feels almost more traditionally Polish than modern Warsaw or charming Poznan, than student-filled Wroclaw, or the cultural stronghold, Krakow. In some ways, it feels like taking a trip backwards through time, to another era, to another land. The winding streets and the bizarre white castle seem to be peeled off pages of an Eastern European guidebook. Everything about Lublin feels more authentic–from the thick beer to the steaming pierogies, to the soft snow to the uneven cobblestones. As the wind rustles your hair, head inside tiny restaurants for some of the best pierogies you’ve ever tasted, and reflect on the long past of this once-majestic place.

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Salles-Arbuissonnas-en-Beaujolais, France (Gathering)

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Salles-Arbuissonnas-en-Beaujolais, France

Weekly Photo Challenge: Gathering

A literal interpretation of ‘gathering,’ this photo is from the gathering of the grapes in the French wine region of Beaujolais, just north of Lyon. It happens every year, around August or September, and lasts between 1 and 2 weeks–and the harvest is no picnic. Grape-pickers must bend over and pick grapes for 8 hours a day starting around 7.30 am, with only midday, evenings, and Sundays for rest. Yet–the ambiance of the grape-picking harvest makes for an unforgettable experience. Home-cooked fantastic French meals, never-ending glasses of house wine, hanging out around the fire, playing games and telling stories, enjoying quiet, village life–all the while simply enjoying the silence. Gathering the grapes is no easy task–but it is an experience we all should have one day. You will never appreciate wine more–and never waste it again!

Albigny-sur-Saône, France

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Turreted house in Albigny-sur-Saône, France

Turning a corner and spotting a pair of turrets, even in a small village, is a pretty normal thing in Europe. There was a moment in history where everyone in Europe with a lofty bank account wanted a castle (during the 18-19th century), and there just weren’t enough to go around. So, they started building – and they got creative. Sometimes these ‘new’ castles were habitable, like this one here in Albigny. Sometimes, they were ‘follies’ (more common in England), where people constructed facades of (usually ruined) castles on their property for aesthetic purposes, like Sham Castle near Bath, UK. Their constructors always pretended they were old and ruined but in fact they were carefully constructed to look that way. Or sometimes they renovated their old mansions to look medieval or Gothic, adding turrets, gargoyles, crinolines, moats, towers, or other objects of the same effect (like the gargoyles at the House of Chimeras in Kiev). Sometimes they modelled their new castles on other famous castles, like Vajahunyad Castle‘s Transylvanian inspiration. Other times, in order to maintain some ‘authenticity,’ they bought up bits of old castles and put them together in a Frankenstein-type creation, like at Kreuzenstein Castle. In any case, with all these creations, it begs the question…what is a ‘real’ castle? Is there such a thing? Or are they all ‘real’ castles…?

Gutmanis Cave, Latvia

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Gutmanis Cave, Latvia

Supposedly one of the Baltic’s early form of tourism was pilgrimages to this cave. It all started with a legend, a story, dating to the age of castles and knights and villains. Once upon a time, there was a princess who lived in a castle called Turaida. There was another castle, not so far away, where a handsome young man lived, and in the middle, there was a cave–pleasant kind of cave–where the lovers would meet to plan their marriage. But there was also a villain, and he wanted the princess for him. So, one day, he went to the cave to convince her to marry him. When she refused, he threatened to force her to marry him. She told him she would trade his hand for a magic scarf that was impossible to pierce by blade. Of course, he didn’t believe her, so she let him test it…on her. Of course, it didn’t work, and of course she knew that. But I guess suicide was considered a better option than a forced marriage… but the story doesn’t end there. Even though the princess died, our prince from the other castle tracked down the villain and avenged her death, and spent the rest of his days caring for their castles and protecting her cave. People started coming there, leaving their marks (coat of arms) in the stone. You can still make a pilgrimage there, hiking from Sigulda all the way to her castle’s ruins in Turaida. In the woods along the way, you can make a detour in order to pay homage to the Rose of Turaida and her infamous cave…

 

Cantabria, Spain

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Punto del Caballo, Cantabria, Spain

Magical blue seas, waves lapping against rocky cliffs with hardy trees clutching to the sides and disused lighthouses perched on their edges. Northern Spain is often overlooked, and even when it is visited, places like Bilbao get all the attention. But hey, head out of the city to the countryside, to the forest, to the sea! And what better way is there to see a rugged coast such as that of Cantabria than by water? Rent a kayak and follow the coastline while searching for hidden coves or silent lighthouses. Maybe if you get lucky, you’ll find trails leading into the forest, old forts from bygone eras of sea invasion, or even a diving platform from which you can jump into the sea!

Warsaw, Poland

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Plac Zamkowy, Warsaw, Poland

Ignore everything you know about Poland. Grey, miserable, poor, cold. Throw these ideas out the window because they aren’t true. Some of the most colorful city centres in Europe are found in Warsaw. Some of the most vibrant nightlife is found in Poland. The Polish capital is a lively place, day or night, hot or cold. Whether there is sun or snow, the Polish are always out and about in their city. Do you like beer? How about vodka? Ever tried pierogis? What about kasza or pickles or borscht? Food in Poland, while maybe lacking in the spice department, is hearty, filling, and best of all, cheap. Both Polish beer and vodka are awesome. There’s many beers, but the main ones are Tyskie, Lech, Okocim or my favourite, Zywiec. Warsaw’s bars are largely concentrated in the old town (above), Krakowskie Przedmieście or Nowy Swiat (the streets leading off the old town). The ‘grungy’ place to go out for a beer is Pawlowy, a ‘beer street’ hidden just behind the main avenue.  But no matter where you go in Warsaw, you’ll always find good Polish drinks! The advantage of going out in the old town is that the architecture and the scenery are pretty nice too!

Dolomite Moutains, Italy

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Castle in the Dolomite Mountains, Italy

If you want a unique, cross-cultural experience, try driving from Verona (Italy) to Innsbruck in Austria. It’s only at the very end–when crossing into Innsbruck–that you arrive in Austria. Yet, arriving in in South Tyol (also known as Alto Adige or Sudtirol) in northern Italy, it already feels Germanic–and Italian at the same time (and everyone is bilingual)! These mountains hold some of Europe’s most precious, unexplored gems: a trip through the Dolomite’s, especially outside of ski season, feels like a trip back in time to the age of exploration. And even better, the Dolomite region of Italy has the highest concentration of medieval castles in Italy, with 400 fortresses, castles and medieval structures rising up from its hills.  Whether you play “I spy a castle” from your window while traversing the region, or whether you find a snug mountain town or village to use as a home base to discover the region on foot, the Dolomite mountains, especially South Tyrol, is not a region to miss!

 

Verona, Italy

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Verona, Italy

“In fair Verona where we lay our scene…” says the famous Prologue of Romeo and Juliet. Even though William Shakespeare never set foot in the Italian city, it is still Verona’s main claim to fame, and thousands of tourists–mostly fans or lovers–flock to Casa Guilietta, or Juliet’s House, from Shakespeare’s ultimate love story. Whether it’s to tour the house, call down from her balcony, take a photo with her (lucky?) statue, or write a love message on one of the blank walls, Juliet and her love are still alive and well in Verona. But don’t let that be the only reason to visit–Verona is a truly charming, beautiful city that dates back long before Romeo and Juliet fell in love–all the way to the Romans. Tiny pizzerias and cafes serving Italian coffee are on every corner. The piazzas are buzzing with life, the sun shines gently on the cobblestones, vibrant markets sell anything from vegetables to furniture to cheese, and everyone–students, tourists, locals–all stop to chat in the street while sipping an elegant espresso. Even if Will never saw the city, he got one thing right… Verona is certainly ‘fair!’

Stockholm, Sweden

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 Streets in Stockholm, Sweden

Interlocked islands, rambling streets, sloping hills, Vikings history, lapping waves—welcome to Stockholm. This is a city on the water. A city composed of islands. One of Europe’s cleanest, greenest cities. Bright and colourful, upbeat and happy, lively and hard at work, Sweden is a sparsely-populated yet very advanced nation. It has a long history, yet is one of the most modern and progressive country in Europe. Perhaps it’s the cold—it make you work faster?—perhaps it’s the language—structured and to the point—or the just the culture—they are known for their directness—but it is hard to beat the Swedes for a nicer, greener, more progressive or harder-working nation where every piece of information is given so directly and every person has the right to walk anywhere they want (even on private property). Well—except perhaps for Norway. Or Denmark. But don’t tell that to the Swedes! 😉

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Grotte des Demoiselles, France

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Grotte des Demoiselles, France

It’s been a long time ; I apologize. Between doing my masters degree in a foreign language, managing both an internship and a job, getting a French civil union with my boyfriend, adopting a puppy, travelling Europe, and generally enjoying life in France, I’ve been busy to say the least. But I’ve returned, and I’m going to attempt to keep up my photo-a-day concept whenever possible! I’d like to start off with place in my adopted country, France: the Grotte des Demoiselles. France actually has quite a lot of caves – over 200! Some are more famous than others (ahem Lascaux ahem), but all of them are beautiful. This cave is located in the south, in the region of Languedoc-Roussillon. Stalagmites and stalactites fall from the ceilings and rise from the floor, creating magnificent “rooms” that look like Gaudi made them (though the colours here are artificial).  Like a lobster trap, getting in is easy, out more difficult – in one hidden corner there is the outline of a cave bear skeleton who spent his last days here. The main room, or the Cathedral, is 52 meters from floor to ceiling. With impressive acoustics resulting from the size of the room, at the bottom of the man-made staircase is a stalactite in the form of the Mother-and-Child beckoning to any adventurer who descends to the bottom, and a nature-made organ pipe plays its song. And keep an eye out for the fairies – legend has it that the “desmoiselles” (‘maidens’ in French) who gave the cave its name were in fact fairies residing inside, and even make it a habit to occasionally save wayward travellers!

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