Vienna, Austria

20100623-Vienna2-Edit.jpg

Vienna, Austria

Splendor. Grandeur. Elegance. Beauty. Magnifigance. Luxury. Marble. Sophisticated. Refined. These are just a few words we associate with the splendid Austrian capital that is Vienna. Old world charm, the age of the steam engine, the golden days, the Victorian era. Vienna, for one reason or another, seems trapped in a snow globe from the turn of the century. It is a city full of grand palaces, of tree-lined avenues, of magnificent churches, of stately gardens, of bustling cafes. Exquisite sculptures like the one above seem to stroll through the city, and fountains trickle in marble basins. This is city that gave us the father of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud, the Empress Maria Theresa, the doomed Marie Antoinette, the scientist Schrödinger and his famed cat. It is the Capital of Classical Music, a hub that entices some of the best classical musicians  to call Vienna home: Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms and of course the infamous Mozart. The Pole Fryderyk Chopin (better known as “Frédéric”) made his debut here. Franz Liszt, the composer Gustav Mahler (buried in Vienna), Max Steiner, Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Antonio Vivaldi, Anton Bruckner, Johann Strauss senior and junior – they were all here. This is a city that exudes music. This is a city where you can see an opera for €3. This is a city were there is classical music playing even in the public toilets. Music, marble and cafes – the three things make Vienna the elegant exemplar that it is today.

 

Advertisements

Harbour of Dubrovnik, Croatia

20100612-Dubrovnik Harbor-Edit.jpg

Dubrovnik Harbour, Croatia

During summer, Croatian beaches become a hot-spot for beach tourists – meaning that it’s best to avoid the country from June-August. However in spring or fall, Croatia is absolutely wonderful. Soft waves lap against Dubrovnik’s rocky shores, ancient forts and lighthouses peer over rocky outcrops, restaurants and cafes line the city walls, smooth stone avenues skirt through the town centre while tiny alleys whip and wind their way around the main plaza. Here, orange clay roofs contrast with the turquoise blue of the famous Mediterranean. Founded in the 7th century on a rocky island named Laus to have provided shelter for refugees from the nearby Roman city of Epidaurum, Dubrovnik still has one of the rockiest shorelines on the Med. Most of what you see in this magnificent city today is due to its maritime power gained under the Republic of Ragusa in the 15th-16th centuries. Not only has Dubrovnik been recognised by UNESCO, but CNNgo attributed it to being among the top 10 best preserved walled medieval cities in the world!

Gdansk, Poland

20100606-Gdansk_AuroraHDR_HDR-Edit

Gdansk, Poland

Until very recently, controlling a port meant power. In fact, this is still the case in many ways considering that about 90% of world’s trade is still carried by the international shipping industry. Long before the invention of the airplane – and before that, the train and the truck – shipping was the method of transport. European powers have been obsessed with finding trade routes to Asia for hundreds of years (inspiring the famed Columbus voyage in 1492… as well as others), going so far as to construct the Panama and Suez canals. During the 15th and 16th centuries, the Russians (who occupied central Russia at the time) had control only of a few northern (and frozen!) ports. Baltic ports were controlled largely by the Lithuanian Empire, or by powers centralized in Riga and Tallinn. The Hanseatic League as well controlled much of the trade in North, Eastern and Central Europe. Russians had staggering amounts of natural resources – but few ports, thereby instigating the struggle for control of the Baltic Sea. Though Gdansk, located in northern Poland on the Baltic Sea, was not controlled by the Russians, other powers (German, Lithuanian, Teutonic Knights…) have their histories mingled with that of Gdansk. Indeed, the Baltic city has been an influential port for nearly a 1,000 years! Today, the Polish city is still an important port, not to mention a hub for Poles on holiday in search of the sea. It is also one of the best places in the world to purchase amber!


Travel to Other Beautiful Places near the Baltic Sea
  1. Malbork Castle, Poland
  2. Riga, Latvia
  3. Tallinn, Estonia
  4. St Petersburg, Russia
  5. Stockholm, Sweden
  6. The Baltic Sea

 

Cantal, France

20120805-French Cantel 1-Edit

Cantal, France

One of the most rural regions in France is Cantal, located in the heart of Auvergne, central France. In fact, there are roughly as many people spread out over the Cantal region (147,000) than there are who love in the capital city of Auvergne, Clermont Ferrand (141,500)!  Located in a region known for its ‘dead volcanoes’ as the French love to say (so, dormant or extinct), much of what infrastructure that does exist is largely made from a coloured volcanic stone. Roads twist and turn, winding through cheery farms and past pleasant fields. It is a quiet place. This is the place one should come in order to seek solace, to escape from the hustle and bustle of the 21st century. Life is simply slower out here. It is the perfect escape – especially in the summer months, when temperatures are mild, and the water from local lakes and streams is perfect for swimming. Don’t miss out tasting the delicious local Cantal cheese, named after the Cantal Mountains (which give the region its name!). Made with cow milk and aged for 1-6 months, it is one of the oldest cheeses in France – dating all the back to the times of the Gauls. You won’t regret it!

Ghent, Belgium

ghent4--

Ghent, Belgium

Ghent, part of the Flemish part of the county, is often overlooked in favour of its more famous cousin, Bruges. Yet, both cities are incredibly beautiful and deserve a visit! In Ghent, you will find canals draped in weeping willows, Gothic and Neo-Gothic architecture, art nouveau designs, cheerful students sipping coffees in colourful cafes, food trucks and tiny restaurants selling fries and gaufres (waffles) in the streets, couples strolling down the cobbled streets. It is a hipster city, and those tourists who decide to visit this beautiful city relish in striking off the beaten path. Visit Gravensteen Castle, take a boat tour of the Ghent Canals, and admire the intriguing Art Nouveau architecture. Here, it is easy to mingle with the locals. Simply stroll along one of Ghent’s many canals until you find a cozy cafe, cheerful restaurant or lively bar – and strike up a chat with the locals. You won’t regret it!


More Places to Visit with Beautiful Canals
    1. Bruges, Belgium
    2. Amsterdam Canals, Netherlands
    3. Annecy, France
    4. Strasbourg, France
    5. Copenhagen, Denmark

 

Innsbruck, Austria

20120720-Innsbruck Reflection

Innsbruck, Austria

Lost in the Dolomites, Innsbruck is the perfect starting point for a mountain trek. You may already know that Innsbruck is in the Austrian Alps, in the province of North Tyrol – what you may know is that just south of it is South Tyrol: a German-speaking, Austrian-looking province of…wait for it…Italy! Yes, you read that right – all due to shifting borders after the War. This region, including Innsbruck and its province North Tyrol, along with two regions in northern Italy, correspond closely with the historical Tyrol region. This accounts for the huge resemblance these regions have with one another, despite being separate (usually very different) nations! Today, only 23% of the Italian Tyrol region speaks Italian as a first language (63% = German). The Italian Tyrol is also one of the richest regions in the EU – despite its rural and mountainous nature. On the Austrian side, many of the Tyrol-Italians come to live, work, and study in Austria for both economical and cultural reasons. These three regions are an interesting example of a cross-border shared culture – the same kind of trans-border relationship that exists in ‘Pays Vasco’ (Basque Country) seen on both sides of Pyrenees (in France and Spain), or in the Alpine regions (ie the ancient state of Savoy between France, Italy and Switzerland), or even the relationship between L’vov, Ukraine and Poland, to which it has historical ties. At the end of the day, borders have to be drawn somewhere – but just because it’s marked on a map, it doesn’t mean one cultural stops and another starts immediately. No; culture, history, language, architecture and heritage are much too fluent and gradual to be that abrupt. So, rock on Tyrol!

Dublin, Ireland

thumb_100_2562_1024

St Stephan’s Green in Dublin, Ireland

In honor of St Patrick’s Day, I present to you a very green Ireland. We all know that Ireland and the color green go together like two peas in a pod (which are also green…). But why? In fact…shocking…Ireland’s national colour was originally blue! I know, this seems strange. No one knows seems to why Ireland switched from blue to green (or where the colors came from either…) but blue seems to be associated with the island’s colonial history as well as with old Irish myths. As for the colour green – well it’s the Emerald Isle, and it’s not hard to guess why. Anyone who has been to Ireland can attest to both its rural nature and its green landscape. Ireland is green because it rains a lot and has fertile ground, without many cities crushing the green countryside (as is sometimes the case in places like England or France where the population is more dense). And St Stephan’s Green – well it’s right there in the name. Even in central Dublin, Ireland is in need of reminding its population that it is in fact very, very green. So happy St Patty’s Day to all of you out there! Get your green on, pinch someone who doesn’t, have a pint of Guinness or Kilkenny and make plans to visit the country that made March 17th an international drinking holiday!

Santoña, Spain

20110823-SantonaWharehouse-Edit.jpg

Abandoned warehouse (Former Albo Cannery) in Santoña, Spain

Arrested decay, elegant crumbling, slow fall into ruin. This little port-side town is generally off the tourist maps – and the economic charts as well. Little Santoña is known for one main export: anchovies. Its port is lined with little warehouses and canneries dedicated to anchovies such as this one – yet somehow, the warehouse district of Santoña doesn’t seem like a place to avoid. In fact, the warehouse district is actually snuggled into the ‘hip’ part of town, across from the marina and a sort of ship monument with a restaurant and look-out point on top. Though Santoña may be off the beaten path, hidden in a corner of northern Spain (which is ALSO off the beaten path!), a quick stopover on a northern Spain trek is a must. Not only does it have some of the best anchovies and affordable tapas, but it also has some of the best beaches (such as Playa Berria), ancient forts (San Carlos and San Martin), and wondrous nature (El Fraile Peak, the point with the El Caballo Lighthouse).

Chateau de Murol, France

20120809-MurolFalcoln-Edit.jpg

Falconer at the Chateau de Murol, France

One of Auvergne’s most popular chateaus, Murol is a round hunk of stone dominating its mountaintop. While in and of itself it’s a very neat castle to visit, another thing that makes it special is the workshops that Murol puts on during holidays and  warmer months. These short demonstrations, activities and workshops show various aspects of what life was like in the Middle Ages for the people of the castle, from nobles to servants. Falconry (or hawking) is one such example. Falconry was quite popular during Medieval times, though only accessible to the wealthy, such as kings, royals, nobles and rich landowners or merchants, as they were the only ones with enough time and resources required to train the birds. Though it began as a means to hunt small game, hawking soon became more for sport than for necessity, as the falconers prided over his own birds and their accomplishments. Birds were trained to return to their trainers’ arms for bits of food and to bring prey back untouched, and hooded when not training. During certain periods at Chateau de Murol, visitors can still experience this ancient sport, watching hawks, falcons, owls and other birds of prey zoom around the castle, only to return each time to the falconers’ gloved arm.


Visit More Beautiful Places in the Rural Country of Auvergne in France
  1. Chateau de la Batisse
  2. The Massif Central in Auvergne Volcanoes National Park
  3. Village of Olliergues
  4. Village of St Nectaire
  5. The Cantal Region 

 

Łódźkie Voivodeship, Poland

20090807-rural poland-Edit

Rural Poland in the Łódźkie Voivodeship

One of Poland’s 16 voivodeships (or provinces), Łódźkie is one of the most rural. The capital is Łódź, and unless you really like cinema schools or urban decay, it’s not the best way to see Poland. However, exploring the surrounding countryside feels like a step back in time. Relatively little has changed in rural Poland. And in a way, this is a comfort; globalization has not overtaken every inch of the earth! Here, people going on living simple, quiet lives. Despite the fact that you will need either basic Polish or a firm grasp on sign language to communicate, these countryside folk are some of the nicest people you will meet. The roads twist and turn through flourishing fields between unchanged villages. Thick woods hide rugged paths and sacred springs. Animals graze lazily alongside puttering tractors, chickens cluck in the garden, and dusty cars meander through the countryside, passing ancient wooden barns and old stone farmhouses. No one is in a hurry; in fact, villagers stop to greet or chat with one another. Life is always being appreciated and little seems to have changed  in a long time.