Les Calanques, South of France

Les Calanques France

Les Calanques, South of France

Opposing the roughness of Marseille is the pristine beauty of the Calanques National Park. Though not far from the city, a short hike into the Calanques park feels like a foray into another world! Offering a 20km stretch of coastline in the south of France, the Calanques are a series of rocky headlands, rough landscapes, hidden coves, and secret beaches. The azure shades of the Mediterranean will dazzle you as far as the horizon stretches. Here in the national park, there are over 900 protected places as well as certain eagles, reptiles such as Europe’s largest lizard and longest snake, as well as countless others. Of the many calanques, some are easier to reach than others – popular calanques are the Calanque de Sormiou or the Calanque de Morgiou. Seen here is the Calanque de Sugiton, easily accessible  from the Luminy University City (under 30 minutes ride on public transport from Marseille’s city centre) for those willing to hike. Before arriving at the amazing coastline, you’ll first experience breathtaking minimalist landscapes reminiscent of the American southwest on your initial hike through the path! Adventurous souls may prefer to approach by sea – either by boat or even better – kayak! NB: Before visiting, check if trails are closed due to fire risk.


  1. Causeway Coast of Northern Ireland
  2. Aerial Views Adriatic Coast from Italy
  3. Dalmatian Coast of Bosnia
  4. Sunrises on the Northern Scottish Coastline
  5. Slea Head Coast of the Dingle Peninsula, Ireland
  6. Dubrovnik Harbour, Croatia

 

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Jabłonna Palace, Poland

wedding at Jabłonna Palace, near Warsaw, Poland

The Ballroom of Jabłonna Palace, Poland

The fantastic Jabłonna Palace (pronounced yab-woana) inhabits a lush, green estate-turned-park on the outskirts of Poland’s capital of Warsaw. Built in a joint neoclassical and baroque style in the 1770s by the Polish King Stanislaw’s brother, it was meant from the start as a stunning royal palace and park complex to stun and awe Poland’s elite. Like most of Warsaw – and Poland – the building is newer than it looks. Jabłonna Palace was burnt by angry Germans in 1944 and the resilient Polish of Warsaw reconstructed it as accurately as possible in the years following the war. Today, Jabłonna Palace’s beautifully Baroque ballroom, elegant dinning areas and classy guest rooms regularly hold concerts, art exhibitions, scientific shows, conferences and – you guessed it – weddings, as well as being open to the public. Even if you aren’t attending a wedding or concert, the grounds of Jabłonna Palace make for a great escape to the outdoors. Offering a much-needed breath of fresh air from the hustle and bustle of Warsaw, Jabłonna Park is a perfect place to spend a spring or fall day to jog, stroll, picnic or simply relax.


More Baroque Palaces and Churches in Europe
  1. Baroque Church in Krakow, Poland
  2. Smolny Cathedral, St Petersburg, Russia
  3. Belvedere Palace, Vienna, Austria
  4. St Cashmir’s Church, Vilnius, Lithuania 
  5. St Andrew’s Church, Kiev, Ukraine

 

Modern Valencia, Spain

 Valencia, Spain Arts and Sciences Museum
City of Arts & Sciences (Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias), Valencia, Spain

Some of Europe’s strangest architecture can be found in Spain – from Bilbao’s famous Guggenheim Museum to Gaudi’s everything (Casa Mila, Casa Batllo, Parc Guell and of course Sagrada Familia Cathedral). As one of the 12 Treasures of Spain and Valencia’s most visited site, the bizarre architecture of Valencia’s City of Arts and Sciences deserves to be on the same list. Covering roughly two kilometres of the former riverbed of the River Turia, this bizarre complex is a homage to modern arts and architecture, yes, but also to science, culture and technology. An opera house, a science museum, an IMAX cinema, a vastly diverse park with walking paths along an open-air arts gallery, an aquarium and a concert venue make up this colourfully bizarre futurist complex. Contrasting strangely with Valencia’s old town, both halves of the city are worth the visit!


More Odd European Architecture

  1. Hundretwasser House, Vienna, Austria
  2. House of Chimeras, Kiev, Ukraine
  3. Mirrored House, Bilbao, Spain
  4. Palais Ideal, Central France
  5. Musee des Confluences, Lyon, France

 

Hautplatz, Linz, Austria

Hautplatz, Linz, Austria, Trinity Column

The Trinity Column in the Hautplatz of Linz, Austria

A city that has been trying to free itself from its Nazi past (it is where Hitler spent his childhood) has elected in the Alt-Right party again in 2017. And yet – it was the first Austrian city to account and make up for its own Nazi past. From renaming streets to erecting monuments to victims and resistance heroes, Linz is still attempting to crawl out from that dismal past. The Trinity Column, a plague column in Linz’s main square, represents thanksgiving for the ending of the violent plagues that swept through Austria. Though Linz has had a turbulent past, the city founded by the Romans in 799 is now a member of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network and was the 2009 European Capital of Culture. Enjoy strolling its charming (and surprisingly colourful) streets, lounging along the Blue Danube (on a sunny day!) and exploring the birthplace of Mozart. Taste one the of city’s famous Linzer tortes or even take the fin de siecle Pöstlingbergbahn, the steepest mountain rail in the world!


Visit Other Cool Off the Beaten Path European Cities
  1. Riga, Latvia
  2. Lyon, France
  3. Ronda, Spain
  4. Poznan, Poland
  5. Stuttgart, Germany

 

Prague at Sunrise, Czech Republic

Prague sunrise Czech Republic

Overlooking Prague at Sunrise, Czech Republic

Bathed in soft, chilly rays of sunshine, the ancient cobblestones, facades and walls of ancient Prague add a warm glow of luminescence on a chill winter day. Though the cold can be biting, winter is the perfect season to pay this amazing city a visit. Not only are crowds thinner, but the city is alive with Christmas – from some of the best Christmas markets in Europe to live seasonal concerts to streets dancing with trees, wreaths, lights and more. Roasted chestnuts, hot wine and local sweet rolls are made and sold on every corner. It is impossible to escape the festive attitude – especially when the snow sweeps in, dusting and blanketing every surface with a layer of soft, white snow! Follow this steep, narrow street up the top of Prague where you’ll come face-to-face with a castle of epic proportions, layered with stones and stories, overlooking not just Prague but a good chunk of Czech Republic (or Czechia) as well. Prague is a perfect Christmas destination in the making!


More Perfect European Winter Destinations
  1. Aosta Valley, northern Italy
  2. Val de Susa, northern Italy
  3. Strasbourg, France
  4. Neuschwanstein Castle, Germany
  5. Warsaw, Poland
  6. Southwestern Norway

 

Łazienki Park at Autumn, Poland

Lazienki Park, Warsaw, Poland

Łazienki Park, Warsaw, Poland

Poland’s Central Park, Łazienki Park (pronouced “wa-djane-key”), or the Park of the Royal Paths, meanders serenely through the urban jungle of central Warsaw. Designed in the 17th century by a local nobleman, one century later it was reconfigured to fit a king – King Stanislaw August, to be exact. Palaces, follies, monuments, statues, lakes, bridges, and forest paths were installed in all the royal might Warsaw could muster. Though royalty in Poland has long since ceased to be (in fact, Poland itself ceased to be for a whole 123 years!), Łazienki Park is still there, a little less royal and open to all us common folk, but an amazing park nonetheless. Populated by semi-wild peacocks (yes you read that correctly!) who wander through the park’s 76 hectres, the park is a special place. In the summer, it hosts open air Chopin concerts (because yes, Chopin was Polish!). And in the autumn, it erupts in vivid splendour – flames of yellow and orange, gold and red. Łazienki Park is a lovely place for a stroll, a picnic, a day at the park, a concert or a bit of sports and exercises – but it is loveliest in autumn amongst the golden canvas.


Other Places to Visit in Warsaw
  1. The Mermaid of Warsaw statue
  2. Stare Miasto or Old Town Square
  3. The Royal Palace
  4. The Wisla River
  5. Zlote Teresy Mall

 

Palais Ideal du Facteur Cheval, France

Palais Ideal Facteur Cheval - Ideal Palace, Hautrives, France

Palais Ideal du Facteur Cheval, France

Welcome to the Palais Ideal, or Ideal Place of the Postman Cheval. Built by a wildly-imaginative postman in the early 20th century in Hautrives, France, this structure is an extraordinary example of naïve art architecture, with definite influences of the Art Nouveau movement of fin de siecle Europe. True to it’s name, this supposedly naive art is made by someone, like Postman Cheval, who has no architectural training. In fact, the Postman simply picked up interesting-looking rocks on his 30-some mile daily postal delivery and brought them home. He went back to the same spot the next day, and found another, and another. Remembering a dream he had when built a palace, castle and cave, he started to construct a bizarre palace inspired by myth, history, nature, religion, and the world all around. In his own words, he said to himself: “since Nature is willing to do the sculpture, I will do the masonry and the architecture.” He kept going for the next thirty-three years until he had built his castle or palace or cave (even he himself admitted, “I cannot express it well.”) until he finally had his ideal palace.


Strange and Bizarre Architecture in Europe
  1. House of Chimeras, Kiev, Ukraine
  2. Casa Mila, Barcelona, Spain
  3. House of Friendship in Moscow, Russia
  4. Zubri Zuri Bridge, Bilbao, Spain
  5. Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias, Valencia, Spain

 

Blue Church, Slovakia

Blue Church, Bratislava, Slovakia Art Nouveau

Blue Church, Bratislava, Slovakia

In the heart of Slovakia’s capital Bratislava, under the shadow of the imposing white walls of 17th century Bratislava Castle, is the aptly-named Blue Church. Initially painted in light pastels to lighten up  the oval-shaped interior, this church dedicated to Elisabeth of Hungary was later repainted in dozens of shades of blue: the walls (both interior and exterior), alter, mosaics, the tower, the roof tiles. All varying degrees of blue, azure, cobalt, sapphire, cerulean, periwinkle, indigo. Built at the start of the 20th century, the evocative church utilises Hungarian Art Nouveau style. Art Nouveau is a short-lived but wildly-popular style that took Europe by storm at the turn of the century, and is characterised by its use of natural shapes and structures, curvy and fluid lines, as well as incorporation of graceful plants and flowers. Though this movement was started in the UK, it was France where it really took off, influencing architectural styles, art, sculpture and design across the main urban areas of Europe. This wildly unique style’s life was cut short by the sharp simplicity of Art Deco and even worse, the drab boxiness of Modernism – but not before the elegance of the Art Nouveau movement had spread its wings throughout Europe. From Riga to France, this Art Nouveau’s fingers left behind some of the strangest and most intriguing architectural wonders in modern Europe.


More Amazing Art Nouveau in Europe
  1. Ghent, Belgium
  2. Riga, Latvia
  3. Barcelona, Spain – Casa Mila 
  4. Barcelona, Spain – Casa Batllo
  5. Belvedere Palace (and Gustav’s Klimt’s paintings inside), Austria

 

Place de Tilleul, Perouges, France

Place de Tilleul, Perouges Village, France

Place de Tilleul, Pérouges Village, France

One of France’s Most Beautiful Villages and one of the most charming towns one can expect to stumble onto in Europe, the tiny, spiral-shaped village lost in the middle of France is reminiscent of another era. The fortified town was built in the Middle Ages, and though Pérouges has no castle, it does feature a fortified church (with extra-thick walls), as well as an enticing maze of weaving streets, all eventually ending at the Place de Tilleul. Today the quiet centre of this tiny village and site of a delicious local restaurant, Place de Tilleul was one the thriving marketplace of bustling Pérouges during medieval times. Crumbling into dust until recent years, the village has seen a seen an upturn in tourism, saving the cobblestoned marvel from becoming a ghost town like so many other quaint but behind-the-times places across Europe. Here in Pérouges and its romantic Place de Tilleul, one can briefly capture a glimpse into another world, a peek into another era, before slipping out through the village gates and back towards the main road that leads to nearby town Meximieux and the 21st century. Pérouges is most quickly approached on foot via the road Route de Pérouges from Meximieux but a far more picturesque way to approach the village is via the forest track along Aubepin Pond.


Other Glimpses of Medieval Europe

  1. Tallinn’s Viru Gates, Estonia
  2. Avignon & its Papal Palace, France
  3. Olliergues village, France
  4. Gutenberg Palace, Liechtenstein
  5. Baluzuc Village, France
  6. Santiallana del Mar village, Spain

 

Wrocław Churches, Poland

20100515-Wroclaw-Edit

Church of the Holy Cross, Wrocław, Poland

Welcome to Ostrów Tumski, or Cathedral Island, hugging the Odra River in the centre of Wrocław. The oldest region of the city, Ostrów Tumski is no longer an island, though this ancient place is still home to some of Wrocław’s most impressive religious sites, as well as adorable cobblestoned streets.  The orange-roofed Church of the Holy Cross is a brick, Gothic-style church that was once used by ethnic Germans while the city was still behind German lines before WWII (Wrocław has at times been a part of  Poland, Bohemia, Hungary, Habsburg Monarchy, Prussia, German Empire, Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany). For both a bird’s eye view and a dive into the religious and civil history of the city, a visit to Wrocław Cathedral is in order – culminating with a not-for-the-faint-hearted climb up one of its massive towers. The origins of the present structure date to the 1150s after the Polish conquest of the region of Silesia and the founding of Wrocław as its capital, though the cathedral was rebuilt following various trending styles through the ages. Today a thriving student town as well as one of Poland‘s (and Eastern Europe‘s) most important financial, cultural and commercial hubs, Wrocław is place of beauty, intrigue, and good-natured charm.


More Cathedrals and Churches in Eastern Europe
  1. Smolny Cathedral, St Petersburg, Russia
  2. Trinity Cathedral, St Petersburg, Russia
  3. Nevski Cathedral, Tallinn, Estonia
  4. Nativity of Christ Cathedral, Riga, Latvia
  5.  St Casimir’s Church, Vilnius, Lithuania