The Bridge of Carrbridge, Scotland

Carrbridge

The Old Packhorse Bridge of Carrbridge, Scotland

Historic, quaint and yet still lively, the wee village of Carrbridge is tucked into the Cairngorms, a massive mountain range and national park that encompasses much of the central Highlands. Though beautiful on its own, what really makes Carrbridge special is its bridge. Spanning the rushing currents of the River Dulnain, its name is a bit of a misnomer – it wasn’t built for cars, but instead for packhorses and foot traffic. The beautiful bridge of Carrbridge dates back to the early 18th century. Before the bridge was constructed, the villagers had no way to cross the river when it was flooded, meaning that the villagers could not get to the nearby Church of Duithil to bury their dead – and death waits for nothing, not even a flooded river. To solve this problem, the bridge was commissioned by Grant Clan chief Alexander Grant in 1717, and local mason John Niccelsone was dispatched to erect the bridge. The Old Packhouse Bridge of Carrbridge held for about a century, though flooding in throughout the late 1700s had a detrimental effect on it. The famous flood of 1829 left the bridge in its present state. Today, Carrbridge is an ideal spot for hikers, cyclists and adventurers to be based, as it is in the heart of the Cairngorms, it is connected to Inverness by train (less than 40 min journey) and it is a lovely wee spot, quieter than the more famed Aviemore, just one stop further down the rails!


Pro tip: Visit in October during the odd but intriguing Golden Spurtle Competition, an annual porridge making contest (yes, this is a real thing! And it’s the world championships…), or in September for the Carve Carrbridge chainsaw wood-carving event. Best access point is via Inverness. The Edinburgh train usually stops in Carrbridge, and there are a few simple but lovely B&Bs there, including the Craigellachie Guest House or the Cairn Hotel. 


More Nearby in Scotland

  • Aviemore (& its stone circle)
  • The Cairngorm Mountains NP
  • Mt Schiellion
  • Inverness

 

 

 

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