Cathedral of St. Panteleimon, Kiev, Ukraine

kievCathedral of St. Panteleimon, Kiev, Ukraine

After having seen the orthodox cathedrals in Kiev – wildly colourful, crazily textured, beautifully gilded, onion-dome topped, with every inch carefully painted, I will never look at a cathedral the same way. Western cathedrals, while impressive and beautiful, rarely stand out from each other. But Eastern Orthodox cathedrals – each one is a separate work of art, each one is different, unique.  This is St. Panteleimon’s, built in Russian Revival design between 1905 and 1912, so it is not terribly old in comparison with other religious structures in Europe.  Some say it resembles the Nevski Cathedral in Tallinn – and there is some resemblance! St. Pan’s was intended to serve as a branch of St Michael’s Golden-Domed Monastery, but was closed and looted in WWII. Today, it is only a hollow shell which has been restored as the main church of a nunnery. It rests in the quiet, suburban park of Feofaniya (getting there is tricky because the Ukrainians don’t post bus signs or if they do, they are in Cyrillic. From M. Libidska take bus 11 or 156 to the last stop) on 1.5 km2 acres of land. It makes a lovely backdrop for an afternoon stroll!

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Nevski Cathedral, Tallinn, Estonia

tallinnkatedral
Aleksander Nevski Katedraal, Tallinn, Estonia

I have fallen in love with a new European nook–Tallinn, Estonia, a place that most people don’t even know exists. This fog-laden Nevski Cathedral isn’t exactly old, only dating back to about 1894. Built during the Russian occupation of Estonia, it is of course built in the Russian Revival style, giving the city a fairy-tale look (it has been said that it resembles St. Panteleimon’s Cathedral in Kiev. Also as a side-note, I just learned that there used to be an impressive Alexander Nevski Cathedral in my former city of Warsaw, demolished 1920. I lived there 1 year, and this was the first I’ve heard if it! A shame too–it looked beautiful). Not that Tallinn needs too much help at looking beautiful or charming; much of the city walls, towers, and gates have survived the wars, and as a result, the remarkably extensive old town becomes a sea of 800 year-old stone and red-clay roofs lost in the clouds!  Tallinn is truly straight out of a book of fairy tales!