Ohrid, Macedonia

20130610-Ohrid town-Edit

Ohrid, Macedonia

Macedonia is a place few Europe-travellers venture. Steeped in history flowing from its most famous inhabitant, Alexander the Great, Macedonia has been at a crossroads for many great civilisations – Greek, Roman, Byzantium, Ottoman. Each empire wrote its own history into the seams of Macedonia, apparent from its ample mosques, Byzantine basilicas, Roman amphitheatres, and winding alleys leading to the shores of Lake Ohrid. The lake is one of the deepest and oldest lakes in Europe, giving shelter to a unique underwater ecosystem, and the town that sits on its shores is even more unique. Taste the thick, Turkish coffee, quench your thirst with a glass of cold spritz or savour a shish kabab, skewers of mouth-watering meat and vegetables grilled to perfection. The narrow, ancient streets curve through the town and up the hill, and it seems like the further up you go, the further back in time you travel. Enjoy the Mediterranean climate as you explore this town lost in time.

Skopje, Macedonia

20130605-Skopje chruch 2__AuroraHDR_HDR-Edit.jpg

The Church of Saint Clement of Ohrid, Skopje, Macedonia

Modern and sleek – in quite a contrast to the ancient orthodox that traditionally come to mind in this region – the Church of St Clement of Ohrid was begun in 1972 and consecrated on 12 August 1990 – which just so happens to be the 1150th anniversary of the birth of the church’s patron, St Clement. Impressive numbers aside, the modernity mixed with traditional design so clearly marks with the rest of the Macedonian capital. Wandering the ancient narrow streets of the bazaars, lined with tiny shops, covered archways, local merchants, and ancient mosques, it is easy to imagine oneself transported in time to the Ottoman Empire. Cross the Stone Bridge – a national icon in itself – to Macedonia Square (shadowed by the massive statue of none other than Alexander the Great), and you cross into the modern era, rebuilt after a 1963 earthquake. Neoclassical buildings, shiny high-rises, and fancy rotundas all recently constructed greet the wayward traveller. It is this interesting juxtaposition between old and new, past and progress, tradition and innovation, expressed here in the form of Skopje’s modern Church of St Clement’s, that is the most striking and remarkable thing about this capital city snuggled into the beautifully diverse Balkan Peninsula.

Zagreb, Croatia

zagrebedit

Zagreb, Croatia

Clip-clip, tally-ho! Jump out of the way because the Royal Kravats are coming by for the changing of the guard! The Royal Kravats, Zagreb’s light cavalry, have their roots in the French Royal Army during the 17th century. Anyone who has a basic knowledge of French can probably guess where the name comes from: “Kravat”, or “cravate” in French, means “necktie,” which was a Croatian special forces unit known for both their military prowess and the special scarf around their necks. Today, the position is ceremonial but still very exciting when in  a great whoosh! a dozen speckled horses trot by you and down the cobblestoned streets of the Croatian capital, carrying decorated military officers on their backs, complete with capes, furry hats, and of course, cravats!