Caves of Clierzou, Auvergne, France

Auvergne caves

Caves of Clierzou, Auvergne, France

The region of Auvergne is surely one of the most under-rated in all of France. Barely a blimp on most tourist’s radars, Auvergne, located in the heart of the country, is home to an incredible mountain range, the Massif Central. Incredibly ancient, beautiful and rugged though accessible, the Puys of the Massif Central are a hiker’s paradise. While the Puy de Dôme is the icon of Auvergne and its mountain range, there are many other lesser-known mountains, like the Puy de Clierzou (or Cliersou), rising some 1,199 metres and home to a network of caves. Though the mountains were remote until opened up by recent roads, the Caves of Clierzou have been used since Antiquity, when they were found and inhabited by the Gallo-Roman peoples. Atop the Puy de Dôme there is the Roman-era Temple of Mercure, but in smaller places like the Caves of Clierzou, there is also evidence of human use through the centuries. From the Caves of Clierzou, one has a good view of the Puy de Dôme, a sacred place for those who built their temple here. Oh and did we mention these mountains are extinct volcanoes? On your hike through the Puy de Clierzou and the Puy de Sansy past the caves, you’ll get the chance to stand inside an ancient volcanic crater…


Pro tip: Clermont-Ferrand is the regional capitol and main point of entry. Near the Caves of Clierzou, Orcines is the closet town, and home to a splendid cathedral (one of five of the same design, like this one at nearby St Saturnin). There are many hikes in the Massif Central and the Puys – the hike up Puy de Sansy (with the added bonus of Puy de Clierzou) is one of the more popular and well-marked. There is some info here and a circuit of Puy de Sansy here. No wild camping or fires allowed. 


More of Auvergne


 

McArt’s Fort atop Cave Hill, Northern Ireland

Cave-Hill

McArt’s Fort atop Cave Hill, Northern Ireland

From most cities, one must drive a long distance to find wild landscapes, but just 15 minutes from Belfast, there lies the magnificent Cave Hill. It is easy to see why fantasy writer CS Lewis – born and raised near Belfast despite spending his adult life in Oxford – gained his inspiration for the fantastic landscapes of his imaginary land of Narnia from Northern Ireland (just look at the bizarre Causeway Coast!). Cave Hill – part of Cave Hill Country Park – overlooks Belfast and yet transport the hiker into another world. With woodland paths starting from Belfast Castle, weave through the moss-covered forests until suddenly you emerge into a clearing facing the magnificent caves that lent the name to hill. Rolling hills, emerald greens, brilliant yellows, rugged rock faces – one almost expects to see a satyr or dwarf making its home in the cave! But it’s not over just yet – follow the path around the hill to the top for this epic view of the hill itself and Belfast sprawled below. On the narrow outcrop in the distance are the remains of an iron are fort – McArt’s Fort. Little is left today (just a few rocks, really), and its exposed position suggests that this rath (ringfort) was only ever used for defensive purposes. Thousands of years later, McArt’s Fort became the secret meeting place of United Irishmen to plot their famed – and doomed – attack in the rebellion of 1798 (when the Irish rose against the oppressive forces of the British nobility and military. The rebellion failed, and caused a large loss of life on the Irish side).  Because Cave Hill is near Belfast, it can get busy but even with other hikers enjoying the views alongside you, this place emits a magic that cannot be rivalled.


Pro tip: Start your hike at Belfast Castle, and follow the signs for the Cave path. The first part is muddy in places, and there are a few steep bits so wear a proper pair of hiking boots. The whole walk is about 7km. There is also a “family friendly” trail starting from another car park on the backside of the hill, but this means you’ll miss most of the good stuff, and it’s not a looped path. 


Other Places in Ireland (the whole island):