Zubri Zuri Bridge, Bilbao, Spain

Zubri Zuri Bridge in Bilbao, Spain Basque country

Zubri Zuri Bridge in Bilbao, Spain

The exotic-sounding words Zubri Zuri simply means ‘white bridge’ in Basque, the local language of Bilbao and the surrounding Pais Vasco (Basque Country). Euskara, or Basque in English, is a fascinating language that, interestingly enough, has no ties to any other Indo-European languages! Bilbao and Basque Country are truly unique. Connecting the more modern side of Bilbao with the more historic side since 1997, the bizarre modern design of Zubri Zuri sports a curved walkway, overhanging arch, translucent glass bricks, and zigzaging ramps. Built as a pedestrian route to allow tourists to reach the even more bizarre Guggenheim Museum of Bilbao, Zubri Zuri Bridge has become a tourist attraction in its own right. Though a convenient way to get to the Guggenheim Museum and certainly worth the experience of crossing this unusual bridge, at some point be sure to walk along the River Nervion opposite of the Guggenheim for phenomenal views of the iconic museum’s strange futurist architecture! One of the things that Bilbao does best is the melding of old and new – Bilbao’s extensive Old Town’s meandering streets, beautiful churches, quiet alleys and quirky shops contrast well to the shining skyscrapers, quirky futuristic architecture and intriguing street art of the West Bilbao. Wander from Bilbao from west to east as you slowly go back in time in this strange but enticing Spanish city (is it really Spanish? Some would disagree…but that’s a discussion for another day) in northern Spain.


More Fascinating Bridges in Europe
  1. The beloved Liberty Bridge in Budapest, Hungary
  2. Epic and futurist Millennium Bridge in London, England
  3. Traditional Chain Bridge in Budapest, Hungary
  4. The ‘Pink Bridge’ of Lyon, France
  5. The historic but broken Pont d’Avignan in Avignan, France
  6. And of course, the iconic Tower Bridge of London, England

 

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Starry Night in Torino, Italy

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Starry Night in Torino, Italy

Cities by night are highly underrated. The same could be said for cities in the small hours of the morning. Night – and by extension early morning – somehow seem ‘bad’ – the immoral dark hours where indecency and ugliness show their teeth. Nights are cold, dark, empty. At night, ‘good’ people are snuggly asleep in their warm beds because everyone knows that bad things happen at night – mostly because ‘bad’ people come out at night. Or so we’re taught. And in some ways, this is true (crime rates, for example, go infinitely up at night). But the rewards for staying up late or getting out of bed early are worth it. Whether we want to be reminded at how big the galaxies are, we are astronomy geeks, or we simply want to see the world in a new perspective, travelling destinations by night is a unique way to get to know a place. Torino, for example, is an entirely different city by night. The cool, Alpine air whistles through the empty streets, each monument, church or palace strategically lit up. The streets are clear and quiet – quite the change from the Italian hustle and bustle typically filling Torino’s city centre. First, enjoy the quietness of an empty city, then enjoy the stars as they spread across the sky, and finally, the best part: enjoy the dawn painting across the canvas of a new day breaking.


More Night Photography in Europe
  1. Cathedrals & Fireworks in St Petersburg, Russia
  2. Amsterdam Canals, Netherlands
  3. Christmas Lights in Warsaw, Poland
  4. Trams in Antwerp, Belgium
  5. Sunset in Stockholm, Sweden
  6. Darkening Skies over Rural Poland
  7. Moonlight in the French Alps

 

Limerick, Ireland

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Limerick, Ireland

Feel like writing a limerick? Or perhaps just visit the city of the same name! The name of the 5-line poetry form is generally accepted to come from this city in western Ireland. Tracing its routes back to Viking times – in fact, cities didn’t exist in Ireland until the Vikings founded them – Limerick doesn’t feel like a city with ancient roots. Once a prominent port city and industrial hub, Limerick sports a lot of brick and concrete. Walking the streets of Limerick actually feels similar to wandering around Boston or any other New England city; it’s not hard to see where the new US immigrants found their architectural inspiration! Don’t let the brick facade fool you though – quirky, bright-coloured doors spice up townhouse facades, charming restaurants line the city centre, shaded parks dot the city squares, and a wide promenade hugs the river, ideal for strolling, relaxing and enjoying the sun (when it’s out!). The ruins of King John’s Castle cling to the river banks, and vivid flowers peak out from every corner. Despite the large size of the city, the people are pleasant and cheerful, always making time to stop for a quick chat – acting much like you’d expect small-town residents to act! Ireland’s 3rd-largest city buzzes with life in a way that is ordinary and extraordinary at the same time. When in the region, take time to visit the nearby Curraghchase Manor Ruins & Forest Park, a great way to get out of the city.


More About Travel in Ireland
  1. Slea Head, Ireland’s Westernmost Point
  2. Knocknarea Hill & Megalithic Site
  3. Dublin’s St Stephan’s Green Park
  4. Muckross Abbey in Killarney National Park
  5. Nun Island in Galway

 

Tower Bridge, London, England

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Tower Bridge, London, England

A cold, dark evening in December in 1952, an old-fashioned double-decker bus #78 was following its route across the Tower Bridge towards Dulwich when the gateman in charge of raising and lowering the bridge failed to perceive the iconic red vehicle. He gave the all clear started to raise the bridge. The bus’ driver, one Albert Gunter, was forced to make one of those split-second, life-or-death decisions we all hope never to make – and hit the gas pedal. His bus shot forward, and the propulsion carried his double-decker bus Knightbus-style over the dark, empty expanse of the Thames far below his wheels, jumping a gap of 3 feet, onto the safety of the other side 6 feet below him, which had not yet began to rise. No one was seriously hurt, and the bus landed upright. His reward for his bravery? 10 quid from London Transport (and £35 from the City of London). Even converted to 2016 standards, that seems a little low, don’t you think!? An added bonus to the story was that one of the passengers was so scared to get back into a bus that she would only ride in Gunter’s bus, who she later asked to be her best man at her wedding! In any case, despite this incident and a few others (including an RAF man who flew a plane through below the upper walkway, and a man dressed as Spiderman who scaled a tower to dangle 100 feet in the air), the bridge remains one of London’s most beloved places, a erstwhile icon of London. Millions visit every year to photograph and traverse the famed overpass, and while there’s not much chance you’ll fly through the air like the 20 passengers on the night of Dec. 30th, the memory of your visit to the Tower Bridge will stay with you long afterwards.

Gdansk, Poland

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Gdansk, Poland

Until very recently, controlling a port meant power. In fact, this is still the case in many ways considering that about 90% of world’s trade is still carried by the international shipping industry. Long before the invention of the airplane – and before that, the train and the truck – shipping was the method of transport. European powers have been obsessed with finding trade routes to Asia for hundreds of years (inspiring the famed Columbus voyage in 1492… as well as others), going so far as to construct the Panama and Suez canals. During the 15th and 16th centuries, the Russians (who occupied central Russia at the time) had control only of a few northern (and frozen!) ports. Baltic ports were controlled largely by the Lithuanian Empire, or by powers centralized in Riga and Tallinn. The Hanseatic League as well controlled much of the trade in North, Eastern and Central Europe. Russians had staggering amounts of natural resources – but few ports, thereby instigating the struggle for control of the Baltic Sea. Though Gdansk, located in northern Poland on the Baltic Sea, was not controlled by the Russians, other powers (German, Lithuanian, Teutonic Knights…) have their histories mingled with that of Gdansk. Indeed, the Baltic city has been an influential port for nearly a 1,000 years! Today, the Polish city is still an important port, not to mention a hub for Poles on holiday in search of the sea. It is also one of the best places in the world to purchase amber!


Travel to Other Beautiful Places near the Baltic Sea
  1. Malbork Castle, Poland
  2. Riga, Latvia
  3. Tallinn, Estonia
  4. St Petersburg, Russia
  5. Stockholm, Sweden
  6. The Baltic Sea

 

Stockholm, Sweden

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Sunset over Stockholm, Sweden

The setting sun over the Swedish capital shines off the facades of the buildings on this neighboring island in Stockholm’s massive archipelago. As the largest city in Sweden, it is also the most populous city in the Nordic region with nearly 1.5 million inhabitants in the metropolitan area. As Stockholm also happens to be one of the most expensive European cities, the best way to spend a quiet evening is to sit out on the quay with a beer in hand and watch the sun set over the Swedish skyline before ambling back into the center of the old town (Gamla Stan) in search of a cozy cafe. If, like so many others, you’ve been watching the recent outburst of Nordic noir series and films (such as The Bridge, The Killing, Borgen, or any one of the many films), explore the city after dark to get a new perspective on Stockholm. But don’t worry; despite the dark nature of these series and films, Scandinavia is a relatively safe place. Just don’t forget to bring a jacket and scarf; the combination of its northern location as well as its proximity to the water makes for chilly air !

Gdansk, Poland

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Gdansk, Poland

Light blue skies hang over the waterfront buildings of this Polish city. Located in northern Poland, Gdansk is one of the “trojmiescie” cities. Together with Gdynia and Sopot, these three cities make up the “Tricity” region thanks to their close proximity to each other. In fact, they are so close that the same tram/bus network services all three, and it is quite normal to live/stay in Gdansk and party in Gdynia then shop in Sopot the next day. Once part of Germany (‘Gdansk’ was called ‘Danzig’ and still is called so by German tourists), this region on the Baltic Sea is today known for its beaches (in Poland, that is), and its amber production (worldwide!). It also happens to be beautiful. While the city isn’t exactly on the Baltic, (the water here is the Motlawa River), it’s only a hop, skip and a jump away from the infamous sea. A visit to Gdansk during the summer months will be pleasantly spent, no matter whether you’re sitting along the river, digging your toes in the sand of one of the surrounding beaches, eating at one of the many pleasant cafes and restaurants on the main street or dancing your heart out in one of the Tricity’s many nightclubs!

 

Budapest, Hungary

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Budapest, Hungary

As is so often the case, the castle offers a fantastic vantage point of the city below. From the castle terrace, one can see all of Budapest: the famous Hungarian Parliament Building, the Chain Bridge, the tower of St. Stephen’s Basilica, and of course, the Blue Danube. And on this clear, sunny Easter day, the Danube is actually blue! Budapest is one of Europe’s best-kept gems. A city with so much to offer, it is often overlooked by mass tourism travellers, though those more adventurous who wander eastward into Budapest are greatly reward for their trouble! Not only is everything a bargain in Budapest, but the city is downright gorgeous and ripe with culture, spice and tradition – especially during spring festivities!

Aberdeen, Scotland

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Aberdeen, Scotland

They don’t call Scotland’s northern metropolis “The Granite City” for nothing—Aberdeen is remarkably grey. But somehow, its greyness is what makes it special. In fact, another of it’s nicknames is “The Silver City;” so-called because the locally-quarried granite tends to sparkle due to a mineral called mica which is infused within the blocks. Aberdeen has been the site of human habitation for something like 8,000 years, and Aberdeen University is the 3rd oldest university in Britain! Unfortunately, it’s also known as Europe’s oil capital—which has undoubtedly brought wealth to the city, but hasn’t exactly helped its reputation. Regardless, its ‘Ancient University’ (yes—that’s an official term in Britain!) has many of foreign students studying within its ancient walls, giving the city an international, worldly feel despite its high altitude.

Long Street, Gdansk, Poland

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Down Ulica Długa to Długi Targ (Long Street to Long Market), Gdansk, Poland

This beautiful Polish city on the Baltic Sea hasn’t always been Polish…in fact, it hasn’t always been called by its’ Polish name, “Gdansk.” Because the city has historically laid upon the border between Slavic and Germanic controlled territories, it has switched hands at least 15 times since being founded in 997. Its position on the Baltic Sea made it a disputed city in WWII, with the Germans taking control of “Danzig.” And like so many other Polish cities, it was demolished in the war, and, once again like all the other cities, had to be painstakingly rebuilt and restored by dedicated citizens–though some German vestiges still exist and German tourists are still plenty. Along with Gdynia and Sopot, the three cities form the Tri-city (Trójmiasto) region, with 1.4 million inhabitants. The Long Street/Long Market is one of the most beautiful market squares in Poland and even in Europe (though it’s not really a square…more of a rectangle!), and even more lovely in warm weather as the Baltic Sea is a just a hop, skip and a jump away!


Travel to Other Beautiful Places near the Baltic Sea
  1. Malbork Castle, Poland
  2. Riga, Latvia
  3. Tallinn, Estonia
  4. St Petersburg, Russia
  5. Stockholm, Sweden
  6. The Baltic Sea