Butt of Lewis Lighthouse, Scotland

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Butt of Lewis Lighthouse, the Hebrides, Scotland

Get this. The windiest place in the UK…is called The Butt (cue endless jokes about the Butt being very windy…)! The Butt of Lewis (confusingly located at the northernmost point of the Isle of Lewis in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides) is a lonely and windswept headland home to a solitary lighthouse. Constructed in the 1860s, this unusual red-brick lighthouse was inhabited by a lighthouse keeper until 1998 when it was automated. Lighthouse keeping was a lonely existence. Being stationed on the comparatively large and civilised Isle of Lewis wouldn’t have been too bad – nearby villages such as Ness, Borve and Barvas kept keepers provided with fresh supplies and news. However, lighthouse keepers on small, uninhabited islands lived a desolate and difficult existence. The most famous case was that of the Flannan Isles Lighthouse, located on a rock pinnacle off the coast of Lewis. In December of 1900, 3 lighthouse keepers were prevented from returning to land after their long shift. When a boat finally arrived, incomers found a desolate and deserted island, wreaked by a violent storm. One coat still hung on its peg, iron railings and railroad tracks were mangled and uprooted, and a crate of equipment ruined… with no one to be seen. The logbooks – not updated for a week – note that the men had been acting strange (hardworn mariners noted as struck silent dumb, crying, and praying) during a terrible storm that supposedly raged for 3 days. The strangest part? The island could be seen from Lewis and ships had sailed the Hebrides waters…but no storm had been recorded. (Goosebumps, anyone?) Even after years of searching for them and the truth of what happened Dec. 15th, 1900, nothing has been uncovered. Conspiracy theorists will say anything from madness to pirates to aliens, though a rogue wave is probably the most likely answer (two men swept off when securing the equipment, the third as he attempted to help or warn the others). But we’ll probably never know – and now that the forlorn lighthouses such as the Butt of Lewis and Flannan Isle are automated, the saga of lonely lighthouse keepers is at an end, keeping their secrets with them.


Pro tip: Take great care when visiting the Butt of Lewis – it is VERY windy. Secure anything at risk of being blown away (hats, scarves, glasses) before approaching. For those who wish, there is a 3-4km coastal walk from Eoropie Beach to the Butt of Lewis. Flannan Isle is hard to get to – if it’s a must-see for you, try with Seatrek


Other Wild & Rugged European Coastlines

 

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Faro de Caballo, Cantabria, Spain

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Faro de Caballo (Horse Lighthouse), Cantabria, Spain

Cantabria is a little-visited region on Spain’s north coast. Though on one side of the region is Basque Country and Bilbao, and the other, the famous Santiago del Compostela, few people know of the region’s existence much less add Cantabria to their Spanish itinerary. It is an out-of-the-way place categorised by mild temperatures, regular rainfall, quiet harbours and green hills. The ocean is the region’s constant companion, supporting a bustling fishing industry – notably, the anchovies of Santoña, which are world-renowned. Not far from Santoña is the rugged Monte Buciero on a spit of land that juts out into the Cantabrian Sea. At the end of the point, at the bottom of hundreds of steps carved into rugged rocky pinnacles is the squat little Faro de Caballo (Horse Lighthouse). Erected in 1863 on this forlorn outcrop of the Spanish coastline, the steps and foundations of the Faro de Caballo were placed there by prisoners of Santoña’s jail. From the 1800s to 1993, the light of Faro de Caballo shone through the waters, warning ships of the Cantabrian Coast. Today, the Faro de Caballo is part of the Las Marisma de Santoña, Victoria and Joyel Nature Park. To get there, start your hike in Santoña and walk along the coast, passing the forts of San Martin and San Carlos and following the rough path through the woods until you arrive at the steep staircase (the route is said to have some 600-700 steps, so wear good shoes!). Be sure you bring your swimming gear as well, as there are several diving ledges of varying heights as well as a swinging rope for the less-adventurous!


Pro tip: The whole hike from Santoña is about 7km, though there is another way (from the other side of the peninsula, by Berria Beach – though I feel that it is more accessible from Santoña. Don’t try to kayak there from Santoña unless there are low winds and you’re an experienced kayaker, as the winds past the headland on the way back can be rough; better to access the lighthouse on foot, bringing all necessary swimming or snorkelling gear with you!


Other cool places in Northern Spain:

Horn Head, Donegal, Ireland

Horn-Head

Horn Head, Donegal, Ireland

Welcome to the ends of Earth – or at least, that’s a bit what Donegal feels like. The Republic of Ireland’s northernmost county also contains the island’s northernmost tip, Malin Head – used as a Star Wars filming location (a stand in for the backdrop of Luke Skywalker’s hideout). Donegal is nicknamed the Forgotten County – and for good reason. It is one of Ireland’s most remote regions, as well as one of its most sparsely populated. It’s cut off culturally and geographically as it is blocked by ocean on one side and the UK (via Northern Ireland) on the other. It was the last region of Ireland to fall to British rule, who then tried to establish and maintain their power in this volatile region by naming the local chieftains “Earls” – a title against which they rebelled and subsequently were defeated and driven away, henceforth known as the Flight of the Earls. Perhaps because of this, Donegal has a high proportion of Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking) communities. On Donegal’s rugged northern coastline stands the devilishly named Horn’s Head Peninsula – so named for twin rock formations that resemble horns. Today, it retains its wild side. It is also the Wild Atlantic Way’s northernmost section. Alongside Mayo, Donegal is about as close to true wilderness as Ireland gets! Desolate boglands, sheer cliffs, jagged headlands and vast heathland dotted with hardy mountain sheep, Horn Head is a place that works as a time capsule, transporting the weary wanderer to another place, another era, another world.


Pro tip: Unlike Scotland and Scandinavia, Ireland does not have the same Rights to Roam. When hiking on private land (most of land in Ireland), be sure that the landowner has given permission for hikers to access their land. Usually this is the case if there aren’t any signs put up. Use stiles when available, but if you do need to open any gates, make sure you close them after you (even if you found them open). 


Other Wild Places in Europe


 

Dingle Peninsula, Ireland

Hiking Dingle Peninsula, Kerry Ireland

Dingle Peninsula, Co Kerry, Ireland

Ah, beloved County Kerry. One of everyone’s favourite places to visit in Ireland must be the Dingle Peninsula. Rugged, green and just a bit wet, this peninsula encapsulates Ireland in miniature. From cheery towns and snug pubs to emerald fields and fierce coastlines, the Dingle Peninsula is deserving classic. If you want to explore it off the beaten path, hike part or all of the Dingle Way, a 179-km trail that circumnavigates the Dingle Peninsula and brings you to Dingle’s wild side where one will be privy to some of the greatest coastal landscapes in all of Europe! Though flat enough, at the interior of the Dingle Peninsula is Mt Brandon, where St Brendan the Navigator is said to have seen the ‘promised land’ and inspired his seven year’s Voyage of St Brendan. At any rate, a trip to Slea Head, Ireland’s westernmost point, is a must for gorgeous coastal panoramas. Next stop? North America!


Pro Tip: From the local harbour, catch a boat to the desolate Blasket Islands, evacuated in the 1950s due to harsh weather conditions, to get a glimpse to what Ireland was like in the past. 


Find other Rural Places to Visit


 

Les Calanques, South of France

Les Calanques France

Les Calanques, South of France

Opposing the roughness of Marseille is the pristine beauty of the Calanques National Park. Though not far from the city, a short hike into the Calanques park feels like a foray into another world! Offering a 20km stretch of coastline in the south of France, the Calanques are a series of rocky headlands, rough landscapes, hidden coves, and secret beaches. The azure shades of the Mediterranean will dazzle you as far as the horizon stretches. Here in the national park, there are over 900 protected places as well as certain eagles, reptiles such as Europe’s largest lizard and longest snake, as well as countless others. Of the many calanques, some are easier to reach than others – popular calanques are the Calanque de Sormiou or the Calanque de Morgiou. Seen here is the Calanque de Sugiton, easily accessible  from the Luminy University City (under 30 minutes ride on public transport from Marseille’s city centre) for those willing to hike. Before arriving at the amazing coastline, you’ll first experience breathtaking minimalist landscapes reminiscent of the American southwest on your initial hike through the path! Adventurous souls may prefer to approach by sea – either by boat or even better – kayak! NB: Before visiting, check if trails are closed due to fire risk.


  1. Causeway Coast of Northern Ireland
  2. Aerial Views Adriatic Coast from Italy
  3. Dalmatian Coast of Bosnia
  4. Sunrises on the Northern Scottish Coastline
  5. Slea Head Coast of the Dingle Peninsula, Ireland
  6. Dubrovnik Harbour, Croatia

 

Dunnattor Castle, Scotland

Dunnattor Castle - Stonehaven - Aberdeen Scotland

Dunnattor Castle, Scotland

Rough and rugged, clinging to a pointed cliff, perchaed atop a low peninsula jutting out into the ocean, Dunnattor Castle is certainly one of the most eye-catching castles of northern Europe. Located on the Scottish Coast near Stonehaven village and south of the sprawling silver metropolis that is Aberdeen, Dunnattor Castle is best approached on foot. Hiking from Stonehaven, take the back alleyways and countryside path that rises behind the village, eventually depositing you in the emerald grass of Scotland’s countryside. Walk between the rolling country hills and sheer coastal drops with fluffy sheep for company, past the Somme War Memorial before turning a bend after about 3 km to see the distant peninsula crowned with its castellated turrets. Dunnattor Castle dates back to the 15th century, and once even hid the Scottish crown jewels from the invading Cromwell army during the 17th century. Take your time exploring the castle as well as its hidden coves and beaches as you listen to the crash of the waves on the foot of the cliff. Whether gazing at this medieval fortress from above or below, it’s clear that it is an extraordinary feat of architectural imagination and engineering!


Other Amazing Castles in Europe To Explore
  1. Kreuzenstein Castle, Austria
  2. Bratislava Castle, Slovakia
  3. Castillo Xativa, Spain 
  4. Malbork Castle, Poland
  5. Vajahunyad Castle in Budapest, Hungary
  6. Turaida Castle, Latvia
  7. Hohenschwangau Castle, Germany
  8. Chateau de la Batisse, France

 

Cantabria Coast, Spain

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Punto del Caballo, Cantabria, Spain

Magical blue seas, waves lapping against rocky cliffs with hardy trees clutching to the sides and disused lighthouses perched on their edges. Northern Spain is often overlooked, and even when it is visited, places like Bilbao get all the attention. But hey, head out of the city to the countryside, to the forest, to the sea! And what better way is there to see a rugged coast such as that of Cantabria than by water? Rent a kayak and follow the coastline while searching for hidden coves or silent lighthouses. Maybe if you get lucky, you’ll find trails leading into the forest, old forts from bygone eras of sea invasion, or even a diving platform from which you can jump into the sea!

Stonehaven, Scotland

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Stonehaven, Scotland

A stone’s throw away from Aberdeen, the quaint seaside village of Stonehaven clings to the North Sea coastline. Aside from the usual charming nature of being in an adorable village along the rugged, Scottish coastline with waves lapping at your feet, Stonehaven is also home to some of the best fish and chips in the UK. Indeed, The Bay won awards in 2012 & 2013 for best takeaway fish and chips, and it is worth the short wait and the slightly high prices for the delicious battered fresh fish. Stonehaven is also the home of the “deep fried Mars Bar,” developed in 1995 by the Haven Chip Bar (now called The Carron). And despite immediately feeling the need to run a marathon afterwards in order to counterbalance the unhealthiness of the snack, the taste is pretty darn delicious! Not only is Stonehaven a good place to come to eat, it is also relaxing and beautiful, especially so after hiking up to the ridge just above the town, watching the light play off the golden-tinted stones and rooftops. While most come here in order to access the equally-beautiful Dunnottar Castle down the road, don’t miss out on the hidden gem that is Stonehaven itself.


More Beautiful Places in Scotland
  1. Aberdeen
  2. Dunnottar Castle
  3. Scottish Highlands
  4. St Andrews
  5. Loch Rannoch
  6. Edinburgh

 

Adriatic Sea, Italian Coast

Adriatic

Ariel view of the Adriatic Sea, Italian Coast

Welcome to the Adriatic Sea, the little body of water to the right side of Italy.  Being connected to the Mediterranean, it is, of course, gorgeously blue. The Adriatic contains over 1300 islands, with a max depth of 1233 meters (which is over 4000 feet)! It’s 800 km long, 200 km wide with an average depth of 252.5 m. Facts aside, the Adriatic is a beautiful part of this continent – and there’s no better way to get a feel for its beauty then from the window of a descending plane (even if it IS Ryanair). This is the sea that accommodates the terracotta roofs of Dubrovnik and the stunning Dalmatian islands, this is the sea that traders sailed up and down making Venice one of the richest cities for a good chunk of history, this the the sea that divides Italy from Greece. The Adriatic is wonderful in so many ways. Whether you want to swim at lovely beaches, relax in gorgeous coastal towns, eat fresh seafood prepared by some of the best cooks the world has to offer, take beautiful photographs of villages on the water, or sip wine with a view, the Adriatic has it all.


More Beautiful Coastlines in Europe
  1. The Baltic Sea from Northern Estonia
  2. The Adriatic Sea from Marjan Hill, Split, Croatia
  3. The Atlantic Ocean from Slea Head, Ireland 
  4. Cantabian Coast, Northern Spain
  5. The Mediterranean in Peniscola, Spain
  6. The North Sea, Northern Scotland