Palace of the Parliament, Bucharest, Romania

Bucharest Parliament Building Romania

Palace of the Parliament, Bucharest, Romania

Have you ever wondered where the world’s heaviest building might be? If so, you probably didn’t imagine you’d find it in Romania… and yet, there it is. The Palace of the Parliament in downtown Bucharest, capital of Romania, claims the crown, weighing in at an incredible 4,098,500,000 kilograms (9.0356×109 lb)! Immense, colossal, intimidating and jaded, this massive relic of Romania’s not-so-distant Soviet past and their affinity for everything concrete, it took a team of 700 architects 13 years (from 1884 – 1997) to bring the Palace of the Parliament into existence. The building is everything you’d expect from the Soviet Era. A gem of Totalitarian architecture, it is a massive undertaking, involving an impressive amount of human labour, complicated architectural skill and huge amounts of building materials, showing off to the rest of the world the Soviet might, skill and technology on the edge of the USSR’s communist reaches. Despite its austere exterior, inside it is ornate and decadent, meant to dazzle the visitor with a different sort of might, in line with many other Communist-era constructions (the Moscow Metro springs to mind! And yes it’s true – if you ever visit Moscow, you have to visit its underground, it is indeed a tourist attraction). Today the Palace of Parliament houses the Parliament of Romania as well as some museums, and is worth visiting inside or out to appreciate its sheer size and the power it still exudes even decades after the clouds of Communism have settled and blown away.


Pro tip: Want to visit inside? Make sure you book over the phone 24h in advance; be sure to have your passport ready for inspection. Looking for some refreshments afterwards? Just a 10 minute walk away, head to Abel’s Wine Bar, a chic, hipster sort of place with delicious local Romanian wines and beers. There are plenty of reds and whites – be sure to try a local wine! Prefer beer? We recommend you taste the local microbrewery Ground Zero. You might not find these beers outside of Bucharest – which is a shame because it’s delicious! 


Other Communist Architecture


 

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Berlin Wall’s Car Crash, Germany

Trabant Car Crash on East Side Gallery, Berlin Wall, Germany

Berlin Wall’s Trabant Car Crash, Germany

Crash! One of the largest canvases in the world, West Berliners began painting on the 14-foot wall in the 1980’s while the corresponding East Berlin Wall remained immaculate – guards would not let East Berliners approach the Wall on pain of death (fearing escape attempts). First constructed in 1961 to separate the two countries, the Berlin Wall (especially the western side) later became what Facebook is today: a relatively uncontrolled blank slate on which people can express opinions, feelings, and dreams. In one mural, a car – a white Trabant – is depicted crashing through the Berlin Wall. Trabants were a popular East German car brand, and despite being cute and bug-eyed, the reinforced plastic cars were poorly made and notoriously hard to drive – though East Germans were desperate to get one, so desperate that they had to sign up on a list just to be considered for ownership. Trabants then became a symbol of the communist East Germany, and ceased to be manufactured after the fall of wall. It’s not hard to understand what the artist was trying to depict here: an East German in his or her iconic East German car crashing through the oppressive and separatist Berlin Wall after it fell in 1989.


See Other Berlin Wall Murals
  1. Brandenburg Tor – Berlin
  2. Swirls – Berlin Wall
  3. “I painted over the wall of shame…” – Berlin Wall
  4. Colourful dancers – Berlin Wall
  5. Escaping over the Berlin Wall

 

House of Friendship, Moscow, Russia

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House of Friendship in Moscow, Russia

Moscow is filled with wonders: golden domes, brick-red towers, huge parks, Stalinistic skyscrapers, broad avenues, elegant theatres, brightly-coloured Orthodox churches. It is a city of considerable fortune (reflected in its extremely high rent prices) that draws people in from all walks of life, either to live there or simply visit this place. Perhaps this vast array of cultures accounts for the vast array of noteworthy architecture. One such example is the so-called House of Friendship, as known as the Arseny Morozov House, located on the far side of the Kremlin. Built at the turn of the century, this fin de siecle folly (fake castle) was modelled after the exotic and eclectic Monserrate Palace in Sintra, Portugal. The design of the House of Friendship includes twisted columns, encrusted shells, and lace-like stonework. Built for party-loving Arseny Morozov, it later became the Proletcult Theatre in the 1920s. This was the branch of Soviet theatre branch tasked with ideology and propaganda, evoking industrial, factory, farming, and other such motifs without much regard towards plot. Sadly, the only way to visit the luxurious and bizarre interior is to attend a concert or lecture held at the house. Instead, gouge yourself on the eclectic exterior while roaming the streets of Moscow in search of the city’s most extraordinary architectural designs – of which it has no shortage!


Other Eccentric Houses in Europe
  1. Hundretwasser House, Vienna, Austria
  2. House of Chimeras, Kiev, Ukraine
  3. Casa Mila, Barcelona, Spain
  4. Casa Batllo, Barcelona, Spain
  5. Mirrored Building of the Department of Health, Bilbao

 

Brandenburg Tor on Pariser Platz in Berlin, Germany

Brandenberg Tor

Brandenburg Gate (or Brandenburg Tor) in Berlin, Germany

Berlin is a place with a challenging history. Located in Germany‘s eastern side, the city of Berlin was part of the state of East Germany for decades before the Berlin Wall fell. Berlin itself was a divided city: half in the East and half in the West. Families divided right down the middle. Lives, jobs, families, loyalties – it didn’t matter. East stayed in the East, and the West in the West. (In the end of course, it was better luck to be living in West Berlin.) But that all changed November 9th, 1989 (still scarily recent…) – the day the Berlin Wall fell. Citizens on both sides reportedly climbed atop the Wall in celebration. The Brandenburg Tor is possibly the most iconic monument in Berlin. Built in the 18th century by Prussian King Frederick William II, the Neoclassical style, topped with bronze statue of noble horses, was chosen for this ‘victory’ gate. The Brandenburg Tor stands on Pariser Platz – the same place as the old city gate that once marked the entrance to Brandenburg an der Havel town, ancient capital of the pre-Germany state of Brandenburg. Used by the Prussians, the Nazis and the East Germans as a symbol of the city’s power, the Brandenburg Gate was partially destroyed in WWII. On August 13th, 1961, the structure became part of the Berlin Wall, and its original use as a gate was re-instated (one of eight points for crossing the Wall). Nearly impossible to traverse by East Germans, the gate remained a symbol of power – but in a negative sense, sparking protests, demonstrations and eventually celebrations the day the wall fell. Today, it reminds Berliners and visitors alike of the power of standing together.


Other Sites to See in Germany
  1. Neuschwanstein Castle
  2. Munich historic city centre 
  3. Hohenzollern Castle
  4. Stuttgart palaces
  5. Dresden
  6. Berlin’s Holocaust Memorial
  7. Hohenschwangau Castle
  8. Heidelberg & Castle

 

Berlin Wall, Germany

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East Side Gallery, Berlin Wall, Germany

Sometimes, a landmark or monument becomes so iconic, so heavily associated with a city that any reminder of one automatically reminds you of the other: ParisEiffel Tower; Rome – Colosseum; LondonBig Ben; Moscow – the Kremlin. Berlin and its Wall belong on such a list. The Berlin Wall, erected by East Germany’s German Democratic Republic in 1961, divided the city in half, cutting off one from the other…until 1989 when it famously fell (though entire demolition did not occur until 1990). Imagine, for a moment, that your city–wherever it may be–was suddenly cut in half by a gigantic wall. Families are separated. Friendships are partitioned. Jobs are lost. Travel is stunted. Freedom is killed. 3.5 million manage to escape to the West before the Wall goes up, but the rest are left behind. Yet, despite all the horrors of WWII, the crash of the Iron Curtain, and the hardships that continued to befall the residents of the Eastern Bloc during the following decades, the East Berliners persisted. And when the Wall finally fell, instead of showing anger and pain, they celebrated life and freedom. They used the largest stretch (1.3 km) as a giant canvas, with 105 different paintings and graffiti depicted on the east side (i.e. the East Side Gallery). Despite the fact that the art changes the original appearance of the Wall, it is a magical display of freedom, democracy, movement and choice celebrated by millions every year from all corners of the globe.

Statues in Wrocław, Poland

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Przejście” (Passage) Statue in Wrocław, Poland

Fourteen haunting figures both slowly sink and emerge out of a sidewalk corner in the Polish city of Wrocław. Constructed by artist Jerzy Kalina in 2005, the figures are a memorial to the two-year period of harsh martial law inflicted by the People’s Republic of Poland. Martial law is normally established when civilian government fails to function properly, or during times of widespread disregard for the law. Military rule is then imposed temporarily upon citizens after traditional government fails until the problem is resolved. This happened in Poland between December 13, 1981 to July 22, 1983 under Communist rule in an attempt to crush opposition. Activists and dissenters were interned without charges or trials by the thousands; people were literally disappearing off the streets – some 100 people were even killed. Kalina demonstrates this period of terror with his statues of people who are literally being swallowed by the earth while going about their daily lives, reminding us of how much freedom we truly possess today. The fear during a time like this must have been rampant – which is only extenuated by how recent it was. Meandering the streets of today’s Poland, it is hard to imagine that this freedom-less period took place barely 30 years ago – and makes you appreciate just how far Poland has come.


More Famous Statues in Europe
  1. Gnome Statues in Wrocław, Poland
  2. The Little Mermaid in Copenhagen, Denmark
  3. Oscar Wilde Statue in Dublin, Ireland
  4. Dragon Statues in London, England
  5. Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, Germany
  6. Warsaw’s Mermaid Statue, Poland

 

Poznan, Poland

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Poznan, Poland

This is the Stare Miasto (old town) of Poznan, a small Polish city in north-west Poland established in the 8th century. It was captured by the Germans (of course), ruined a bit (like most of Poland), and then recaptured by the Russians who ruined it a bit more (by putting up ugly buildings), and finally gained its freedom when Communism fell in 1990, when it was renovated by the proud Poles. In 2012, it was one of the host cities for UEFA Euro 2012 Cup, when Poland jointly hosted the Euro Cup with Ukraine. Success stories from cities like Poznan show just how far Poland has come since the early 90s! And like most main squares in Poland, Poznan’s gorgeous rynek (market square) pairs cobblestones with vibrantly coloured buildings, creating a beautiful town centre (even during a snowstorm such as this one).


More Beautiful Towns to Visit in Poland
  1. Turon
  2. Wroclaw
  3. Kazimierez Dolny
  4. Zakopane
  5. Lublin

 

Berlin Wall, Germany

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Berlin Wall, Germany.

Yes, this is the infamous Berlin Wall that was torn down on November 9th, 1989 after communism fell. Over a kilometre long, the East Side Gallery is an international memorial to freedom and has over 100 paintings. Some people even argue that this is the largest open-air gallery on display. The above painting is just one of them, a piece without a title by the Russian-born artist Gamil Gimajew, that is an explosion of colours, words, swirls and hidden faces. The paintings on this wall, created in 1990, represent freedom, hope, and a better future. Twenty years later,  this so far seems to be true for Germany! If nothing else, walking along the East Side Gallery is an amazing way to experience both art and German culture without paying an entrance fee.