Sagunto, Spain

saguntoorangeW

Sagunto, Spain

It’s hard to imagine that in 12 days (twelve!), I will be back in Spain – and for the whole summer! Spain is certainly one of those countries that is so…flavourful, so memorable. Memories of Spain do not get jumbled into a pile of “vaguely-European memories;” instead, they stand out, just like this bright orange house in the adorable village of Sagunto, not far from Valencia. Spanish cities are great for the nightlife, but Spanish villages are where you go if you like to eat, drink, take beautiful photos, see ancient buildings, and watch the magnificent sunsets. Sagunto, an ancient Roman city, may not be huge and sprawling, but it creates its own miniature “bustling” world. The people are nice, the weather is great, the beach is close (6km), the beer is cheap, and the views are fantastic – what more could you want?

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Sagunto, Spain

Saguntocastle

Sagunto Castle, Spain.

This cactus-embraced castle presides over the small and very ancient town of Sagunto, Spain. Founded by the Romans in 219 BC, over time this town has been home to the Romans, the Arian Visigoths, the Muslims from Northern Africa, the Castilians, James I of Aragon, the French (oh Napoleon) and is now a Spanish town in the province of Valencia. The castle itself, while somewhat ruinous, is an interesting mix of Roman and Moorish design and is in a decent state for its age. And of course it’s always a great photo-op! As this was very close to my former home in Spain, I was a repeat visitor to this place.  I used it as a place to relax, siesta, read books, paint, draw, picnic, or simply enjoy the view.

Comunidad Valenciana, Spain

valencianoranges

Valencian oranges, València region, Spain.

Valencian oranges are world-famous – and they should be! Nicknamed summer-oranges because they are the only variety peaking in mid-summer, these fruits are sweet and delicious, perfect for making homemade, freshly-squeezed, pure orange juice. So delicious are these fruits, and so readily available are they in Spain, that it is difficult to consume other orange products (especially orange juice!) after leaving the country. Groves of trees such as this line the roadsides in between villages all over Spain, but especially in la Comunidad Valenciana. Nothing could be lovelier or more Spanish than breakfasting on your balcony watching the sun come up, eating a croissant and sipping freshly-squeezed Valencian orange juice.