Ballina, Ireland

Ballina.jpg

Ballina, Ireland

The wee town of Ballina, first established in the Middle Ages, is not the sort of place that makes it on most Ireland tourists maps, largely due to its little-visited location in northwestern Ireland. Lively and colourful, Ballina portrays everything you’d expect out of a traditional Irish town: bustling downtown, cheery pubs, colourful facades and plenty of churches. Located in Co Mayo,  a rural region north of Galway, few people have heard of this region and even fewer visit. And it’s true that eastern Mayo isn’t terribly exciting – but the western and coastal parts of Mayo are some of Ireland’s most beautiful landscapes! From the ancient abbeys of Rosserk Friary and Rathfran Abbey to the wild cliffs and sea stack at Downpatrick Head, the ancient archeology of the Ciede Fields or the utter wilderness of Ballycroy, the Nephin Beg mountains and Banger Erris, this forgotten corner of Mayo packs a bundle. And the market town of Ballina makes for a perfect jumping-off point!


Pro tip: Though its location isn’t as dramatic as some other sites, check out the Neolithic monument (4,000 years old!), the Dolman of the Four Maols, just down from the train station. You can get to Ballina either by rail or bus, but to visit the wilds of Mayo, you’ll really need a car. 


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Lough Conn, Co. Mayo, Ireland

Lough Conn, lakes County Mayo Ireland

Lough Conn, Co. Mayo, Ireland

Northern County Mayo is perhaps the closest you’ll get to true wilderness in Ireland. At the very least, Mayo is remote (and travel to and around), rural, quiet, and under-rated. There is little tourism infrastructure in the northern nether regions of Mayo (the southern part of the county fares better: parts of Connemara, the town of Westport and the holy mountain of Croagh Patrick all draw visitors). The problem does not lie in the lack of beauty – more in the lack of roads leading to said beautiful places. Lough Conn, a large lake outside of the not-overwhelming town of Ballina, is a diamond in the rough. Not far off the famous Wild Atlantic Way driving route, the glittering shores, fantastic sunsets, and little-visited beaches make Lough Conn an ideal place for off-the-beaten-track nature enthusiasts. It is a lovely place for wild camping (otherwise known as ‘real camping’ – no showers or wifi here!) or even just a beachside barbecue on a sunlit evening at the end of summer. Lough Conn itself is quite large – it measures 14,000 acres (57 km²). There are two accounts for the name (and very existence) of the lake. In Irish mythology, Lough Conn was created by famous giant Finn McCool (also credited with creating the Giant’s Causeway – a story for another day!). Hunting with his hounds Conn and Cullin, they chased a wild boar for days until water began to pour from the boar’s feet. It swam across the newly-created lakes one after the other but Conn the Hound drowned in the first lake (Lough Conn) and Cullin drowned in the second lake (becoming Lough Cullin). A version of the story was later attributed to an Irish chieftain, Chief Modh, though in this account, the pigs, not the hounds, was drowned. Drowning aside, both lakes are lovely, quiet places – a true glimpse into unspoilt Ireland. For a bit of local culture, stop by Foxford Woollen Mills on the way back to civilisation – a respected local weaving and crafting designer!


More Places to Experience Wilderness in Europe
  1. Auvergne, France
  2. Tatra Mountains in Poland & Slovakia
  3. Sognefjord, Norway
  4. Highlands in Scotland
  5. Alps, Switzerland