Franciscan Monastery on Lopud Island, Croatia

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Holy Mary of Spilice Church on Lopud Island, Croatia

Built in 1483, the beautiful Church of Marija od Špilice or Mary of Spilice was constructed as part of Lopud Island’s Franciscan Monastery. Lopud Island is one of the three Elafiti Islands in the Adriatic Sea off the coast of southern Croatia. Lopud was first inhabited by the Greeks and then the Romans, though no architectural ruins remain. Once part of the powerful and ancient kingdom of Ragusa, the island hosts some spectacular medieval ruins – such as this Franciscan monastery, as well as a second monastery, several hermitages, aristocratic villas, a couple of forts and far too many churches to count. Though Lopud’s main Franciscan monastery is literally crumbling around itself, the complex still contains a working church. It’s a miracle that Lopud’s monastery is still here – it has survived earthquake, fires, annexation, dereliction, war, and other disasters, and yet here it is today, overlooking Lopud’s lovely harbour, marvelling visitors to this tiny, bucolic island every day in the 21st century.


Pro tip: Most people only visit the island (along with the other Elafiti Islands) as day trip from Dubrovnik – unsustainable tourism. However, the best way to visit the island – or any of Croatia’s islands – is to spend more time than an hour or two – or even the night. 


Visit Other Destinations Along the Adriatic Sea


 

Harbour of Dubrovnik, Croatia

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Dubrovnik Harbour, Croatia

During summer, Croatian beaches become a hot-spot for beach tourists – meaning that it’s best to avoid the country from June-August. However in spring or fall, Croatia is absolutely wonderful. Soft waves lap against Dubrovnik’s rocky shores, ancient forts and lighthouses peer over rocky outcrops, restaurants and cafes line the city walls, smooth stone avenues skirt through the town centre while tiny alleys whip and wind their way around the main plaza. Here, orange clay roofs contrast with the turquoise blue of the famous Mediterranean. Founded in the 7th century on a rocky island named Laus to have provided shelter for refugees from the nearby Roman city of Epidaurum, Dubrovnik still has one of the rockiest shorelines on the Med. Most of what you see in this magnificent city today is due to its maritime power gained under the Republic of Ragusa in the 15th-16th centuries. Not only has Dubrovnik been recognised by UNESCO, but CNN attributed it to being among the top 10 best preserved walled medieval cities in the world!

Zagreb, Croatia

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Zagreb, Croatia

This little Croatian capital has a challenge competing with Croatia’s beautiful Dalmatian Coast cities, its lovely beaches and its magnificent national parks. And yet, this offbeat inland capital has its own charm. It sports a downtown full of cafes and restaurants, decorative spires rising above the rooftops, statues that pop up in unexpected places. Meandering quirky streets carries you among adorable shops that surround the traditional old town. Regal palaces now converted into museums and institutions line the avenues shooting out of the centre. Colours slide off the facades of houses and palaces alike. When the sun is shinning, people stroll down the streets, lounge in the parks and drink a cold, local beer on sidewalk tables. Brides in wedding gowns pose for photo-shoots and students picnic in the grass. Though the beach is far away, and Zagreb is neither as beautiful as Dubrovnik or as historic as Split, it is still well worth the time to stop by this little Balkan capital!

Dubrovnik, Croatia

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Dubrovnik, Croatia

10 years ago–hell, 5 years ago–Croatia didn’t make the map. Today, a lot has changed; Croatia is now one of the most popular destinations for tourists from both Europe and abroad. Why? Well, with a view like this, what’s not to love? Cheery orange roofs, rugged rocky outcrops, sandy beaches, palm trees, pizzas, dramatic fortresses perched on cliffs, prices cheaper than Italy but with a view of the same Adriatic Sea. Out of all former states of Yugoslavia, the EU’s newest member has come the farthest. Dubrovnik, who shares the title “Croatia’s Crown Jewel” with Split, is one of Europe’s busiest “cities.” While this influx of travelers has been great for the Croatian economy, it also means that you should expect to see large numbers of tourists while visiting these two cities. However, in between, you will find smaller–but no less beautiful!–places such as Hvar, Brac, Bisevo, Sipan, Trogir. No matter what, Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast is to die for!

Dalmatian Coast in Bosnia & Herzegovina

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Neum and the Dalmatian Coast in Bosnia & Herzegovina

What do you know about Bosnia? Probably the war, probably a vague knowledge of its geographic position as “somewhere in Eastern Europe,” probably that it once was part of Yugoslavia, probably not much else. But did you know that this little-landlocked country isn’t landlocked? The town of Neum actually splits Croatia in two (anyone driving from Dubrovnik to Split must pass through it). It’s certainly true that, even just passing through, one can see the socioeconomic difference between these two Balkan countries; Croatia has a certain shine to it that Bosnia does not–but that doesn’t stop the view from being gorgeous! While Mostar is probably Bosnia’s crown jewel, it’s still exciting to pass through this small town and take a moment to remember all this little country has been through in recent years. While one day, I’d love to visit the beautiful Mostar and its famous bridge, for now, I can make due with Bosnia’s little slice of the Dalmatian Coast!

Lopud Island, Croatia

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Harbour on Lopud Island, Croatia

Located not far from Dubrovnik, Lopud Island–1 of 3 main isles of the Elafiti Island archipelago–is known for sun, sand, and orange clay roofs. Croatia itself has become immensely popular of late as a prime summer vacation spot. Dubrovnik and Split are bustling and active cities–though of course beautiful and unforgettable! But why not escape the city centre? For a country with so much coastline, a country known for its beaches and waters, why not get out on that famous water? Why not see the beautiful Dalmatian Coast from a boat? You will surely be rewarded. These isles are but a taste of what is out there. Lopud itself is small, less than 5km2 with a population of 22o. On it, you’ll find a Franciscan monastery–you can just see the church spire in the distance (could you imagine monks being here? Did they chill on the beach then like we do now? Probably not…). Along the sandy shores of Lopud, there are also a few other small ruins, many adorable houses, a lot of palm trees, and some amazing views!

Trg Republike, Split, Croatia

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Trg Republike, Split, Croatia

Republic Square, or Prokurative as it is known locally, is Split’s magnificent (and largest) of public squares. Because of its Neo-Renaissance style and usage of Venice as a model, walking through Trg Republike is like stepping into Venice. And it’s not only this square that one has the feeling of being in Italy—Croatia and Italy share a long history dating back thousands of years. Located just across the Adriatic Sea from Italy, Croatia was geographically located at the centre of the Roman Empire. This proximity bound the Dalmatians to the Venetians—who were regarded as the Mistresses of the Adriatic—as they shared both culture and language. Today, though Croatia and Italy are two separate countries speaking languages from two separate language families, the pair have much in common: architecture, food, weather, lifestyle, landscape. Yet still, even with all of these superficial similarities, the people still hold onto their own traditions, their own uniqueness, their own culture—and Croatia is a country worth getting to know.

Church in Neum, Bosnia & Herzegovina

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Church in Neum, Bosnia & Herzegovina

This is the “new” church of Neum, Bosnia’s only coastal town. Nuem splits Croatia right in two along the famously beautiful Dalmatian Coast. Bosnia, which was formally part of Yugoslavia alongside other nearby countries such as Croatia and Serbia, managed to hold on to roughly 25 km of coastline.  While it has the same orange roofs as Croatia, it is sadly obvious that Croatia has more money and more tourists–and the bloody war from 1 March 1992 to 14 December 1995 in Bosnia didn’t exactly help. Because Croatians (and Croatian tourists) must go through Bosnia to get from Dubrovnik to Split, a bridge was proposed to bypass security checks (and cut down on the possibility of stowaways); however, the Pelješac Bridge could potentially violate Bosnia-Herzegovinian rights under the International Law of the Sea, so all plans have been suspended. Neum is a small town of 4,600 people, cheap prices attracting lots of Croatian shoppers – and one great view (even in this rainstorm!).


Find Other Intriguing Churches in Eastern Europe
  1. Church of Sts Clement & Panteleimon in Ohrid, Macedonia
  2. Nativity of Christ Cathedral, Riga, Latvia
  3. The Church of St Clement of Ohrid, Skopje, Macedonia
  4. St Andrew’s Church in Kiev, Ukraine
  5. St Casimir’s Church, Vilnius, Lithuania