Cliffs in Ronda, Spain

rondaW

Cliffs in Ronda, Spain

Literally split in two by a massive cliff, Ronda is considered the capital of the Pueblos Blancos region of Andalucia (southern Spain). And Ronda is drop-dead beautiful! The white cliff dwellings are picture-perfect, the atmosphere is chill, the sun is shinning, the sangria is pouring. Ronda has the heart of a village – and the size of a town! Obviously, the canyon, El Tajo, is what truly makes this town stand out. A famous scene in Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls relates how Fascist sympathisers were tossed off a cliff in a fictional Spanish town during the Civil War (1936-9) – and many claim that Hemingway used Ronda as a model for his fictional story. Nearby, there are also fascinating and well-preserved ruins of the Arab baths. As the whole town is built precariously into this cliff and mountainous region, you’ll have to navigate winding roads, hairpin turns and narrow bridges crossing deep gorges to approach the baths. But despite any falling Fascists or narrow gorges, Ronda is one of the prettiest Spanish town – and that’s saying a lot!


More Beautiful Small Towns and Villages in Sunny Spain
  1. GrazelamaAndalucia
  2. Zahara de la Sierra, Andalucia
  3. Segovia (near Madrid)
  4. Toledo (near Madrid)
  5. Santillana del Mar, Cantabria

 

Ronda, Spain

Ronda

Ronda, Spain

Somewhere in the south of Spain, in the heart of Andalusia, in the midst of the White Village region lies the lovely town of Ronda. As one can tell from the photo, Ronda is famously split into two sections by a dramatic gorge with dangerously steep cliff-sides.  Pretty white houses cling to the edges, the Guadelevin River cuts through it, and cacti slowly crawl their way up the steep faces of the cliffs. The site itself dates back to the Neolithic age, was once home to the Celts, the Phoneticians and later conquered and rebuilt by the Romans.  As with most Spanish cities, its history is impressive! As for its most distinctive feature…these famous cliffs were actually the model for the cliffs from which the fascists were thrown off in Hemingway’s novel, ‘For Whom the Bell Tolls.’