Autumn in Loughrea, Galway, Ireland

Loughrea cabin copy

Autumn in Loughrea, Galway, Ireland

Though perhaps less world-famous than America’s New England, Ireland in autumn is a spectacular place. The region of Galway is usually known for two places: the lively Galway City and the desolate mountains of Connemara in northwest Co Galway. Inland however, Galway holds other wonders, such as rural hills, crumbling ruins, tiny villages, and beautiful forests such as here at Loughrea. Loughrea in Co Galway is not an area well-known to tourists as it is inland and away from the ocean. Instead, it sits on the shores of a lake, with vestiges of its medieval history nearby (town walls, priories, and a gate). Founded by Richard de Burgo, an Anglo-Norman knight in 1236, the town grew based on its important location along the Shannon River. Despite its Norman origins, the family later adopted Gaelic names and traditions, and Loughrea, along with much of Connemara, was part of the Gaelic Revival in the late 1800s (which included the Irish language as well as Gaelic sports, architecture, music and other traditions), though its garrison status meant that it did not take part in the 1916 rebellion. This cabin near the small town of Loughrea is particularly idyllic, nestled into the brilliant golden leaves. In autumn these forests glow in a shimmering quilt of yellow, orange and red, making for some beautiful panoramas and lovely photos. Autumn in Ireland is a great time of year to get outdoors as there are few tourists and oftentimes a fair amount of clear days as long as you don’t mind a bit of chilly weather! At the end of the day, curl up by a turf fire in a traditional pub with a pint of Guinness while listening to trad music  and you have the perfect day.


Pro tip: Check out Irishtrails.ie for more info on hiking trails in Ireland and where to find the trailheads.


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Nun’s Island Theatre, Galway, Ireland

GalwayRED.jpg

Nun’s Island Theatre, Galway, Ireland

The cherry-red doorway stands out amongst the backdrop of grey stone. Doorways, being a threshold between one place and another, always feel like opportunities that provide endless possibilities regarding what lays on the other side. While a universal object, doors and their thresholds often still somehow manage to stay culturally unique, varying dramatically across Europe (and by extension, across the world as well). Doors in Ireland are often bright, colourful and arresting – see this door in Dublin for example – which reflects the playfulness of the Irish culture. This door opens onto the old Nun’s Island Theatre in west coast city of Galway, just a stone’s throw away from the youthful Galway Cathedral. Built in Neo-classical style, this proud little theatre was once a Presbyterian church in the 19th century. Nun’s Island, the theatre’s location and namesake, gets its name from a group of 30 nuns from the order of Poor Clare who sought shelter on the island during  the  Ulster Rebellion of 1641. The striking red door and gate is an eye-catching sight on this otherwise low-key street in Galway, one of the most beautiful cities along the western coast of Ireland.