Wells Cathedral, England

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Wells Cathedral in Wells, England

Southern England’s county Somerset  is a great place for exploring the quintessential English countryside dotted with farms, small towns and cathedrals and abbeys such as Wells Cathedral. In 1175, the magnificent building of Wells Cathedral was constructed (though not terminated until 1490!). Dedicated to St Andrew, it is the seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells, and is among the most important cathedrals in England. Some historians say that Wells Cathedral is actually the first truly Gothic building in all of Europe – quite an impressive achievement, and enough to draw amateur historians and architecture nerds in from near and afar. On the grounds of Wells Cathedral, besides the beautiful cathedral, find also the Bishop’s Palace, a series of stunning gardens and the 15th century Vicars’ Close. Wells is a relatively small town in the rural county of Somerset, and so Wells Cathedral is not far from the lush green English countryside.


Pro tip: Wells is a great day trip from either Bath or Bristol (1 hour). From Salisbury, home to another famous cathedral, Wells is about 1h30. Wells can easily be combined with Glastonbury, a place recognised for its music festival and Arthurian legends, just 15 minutes away. 


Other European Cathedrals Worth Visiting

This post originally appeared in 2013 but has since been revised and rewritten.

 

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Glastonbury, England

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Fields near Glastonbury, England

If there’s one thing that is certain, it’s that England is green. In fact, it is very green. Clearly, it must rain A LOT to make it this green! Right? And yet, if you look at annual rainfall in Glastonbury (southern England), it varies between 45-90 mm. If you look at a rainfall in a place, like, say, Washington DC (which isn’t a desert, but also not known for its torrential downpour), it varies between 50-100mm/month! How can this be? How can this English city and Washington have roughly the same average annual rainfall? England is the rainiest place on Earth! But no, not according to the numbers. Basically, English weather is grey, overcast, with a daily spritz of rain. And in DC, when it rains, it pours – and then it’s finished. So while English weather means lots and lots of beautiful green fields – it also means consistent greyness (note: see sky in above photo). That said, England is still one of the loveliest places on Earth!

Glastonbury Abbey, England

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Glastonbury Abbey, England

Welcome to the ruins of Glastonbury’s abbey, established 712 AD (and disestablished 1539), of Benedictine origin. As a visual monument, not much remains. However, it’s not what’s above-ground so much as what is – or isn’t – buried below its grassy flooring that makes it interesting. To start with, legend has it that Joesph of Arimathea founded it in the 1st century. Secondly – and more fantastically – legend claims that this is the legendary Avalon of your childhood stories, that this is the final resting place of everybody’s favourite storybook hero, King Arthur. Supposedly, Arthur and Guinevere were buried here long ago and later discovered by the abbey’s residents (conveniently, right about the time they were low on funds), attracting visitors from afar to view these famous graves – all the while supplying the monastery a steady income. Then, sometime in the 1500s, a fire ravaged the complex and the graves were lost or destroyed – rather conveniently, I might add. Real or not, the cunning monks had the last laugh – because people still come from afar to see Arthur and Guinevere’s graves – and ironically, even though the coffins are long gone and only a small sign remains, these visits are still providing the monastery with its steady income.

Glastonbury, England

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Glastonbury Tor, England

This “tor” (“hill” in Celtic) rises in the middle of a plain which was once an island bog. Now, it houses St Micheal’s Tower, the site of which dates back to the Dark Ages. Home of the neighbouring Glastonbury Music Festival, Glastonbury also makes the history books as the possible burial site of the legendary King Arthur. Is this Avalon? The people of Glastonbury seem to think so! The story is that Arthur, mortally wounded, was brought to the Isle of Avalon to a monastery for medical care. Glastonbury was still an island at the time, and it has an Abbey, so the story fits. In 1191, the monks unearthed an oak coffin with Arthur’s name on it. The put it in a black marble coffin, which was put on display until the Abbey was vandalised in the 1500s and it vanished. Ooh conspiracies…