Les Monts des Beaujolais, France

beaujolais-valley

Autumn Sunset over Les Monts des Beaulojais, France

France’s Beaujolais in autumn is a lovely, vibrant place – rich oranges, reds, yellows and golds contrast with the brilliant azure skies and the remaining emerald greens. It is magical place, reminiscent of a fairytale storybook. Contained within the Beaujolais, a breath-taking region just north of beautiful Lyon, are the enchanted Monts des Beaujolais, a colloquial name given to this corner of the Massif Centrale mountain range parading across the historical region. Though long integrated into the larger Rhône-Alps (really Auvergne-Rhône-Alps; French départements keep growing), the Beaujolais maintains its own identity. The hills, soil and climate make it ideal for wine-growing – in fact, some of France’s most respected wines come from this region, alongside sister vineyards of the nearby Côtes de Rhône. Want to try some Beaujolais wine? Next time you’re in France, try a Mâcon, Brouilly, Morgon, Fleurie, Chénas or even a simple Beaujolais Villages! Every fall, once grapes have been harvested, pressed and fermented, the Beaujolais villages celebrate the 3rd Thursday of November with a festival to taste the Beaujolais Nouveau – the season’s new wine. With 12 AOCs (Protected Destination of Origins), the Beaujolais produces on average 1 million hecto-litres each season, of which 97% from Gamay grapes (almost exclusively red wine). And it’s not just wine that makes the Beaujolais special. What makes the Beaujolais ideal for growing grapes has made a prime region to control over the centuries – hence the remnants of ramparts and fortifications. It is a beautiful region full of colourful hills each topped with ancient medieval villages, crumbling and imposing castle ruins.


Pro tip: For the most adventurous, sign up for les vendanges, the grape harvest in August/September. Hard work but worth it! For those with less time, simply visit an authentic vineyard for a tasting fresh from the barrel. Visit the tourism office in Lyon or Villefranche-sur-Saône for an updated list in vineyards. 


Other Lovely Spots to Visit Near Lyon


 

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Vineyard of Robert Sauzay, Beaujolais, France

Vineyard in Beaujolais, France

Vineyard of Robert Sauzay, Salles-Arbuissonas-en-Beaujolais, France

Wine has always been an important part of French culture, and French wine has always been an important part of the wine industry. Dating back to 6th century with the colonisation of southern Gaul (notably, Marseille), viticulture took hold in France, who made the act of wine production an art, integrating it deeply into their culture. Many grapes you’ve heard of (such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Pinot noir, Sauvignon blanc, Syrah, etc.) have their roots (literally!) in France – because the ancient Gauls practised a new technique allowing them to increase production: they pruned their vines. Since then, various groups preserved the art of wine-making: the Romans, medieval monks, the French nobility. Today, France is still a top wine producer.Here, wines are identified by the vineyard, chateau, manor, village, monastery, etc. where the alcohol is produced (not by the grape itself). This is known as the ‘terroir’ (linking wines to production location – exe. see Tain l’Hermitage). The AOC (Appellation d’origine contrôlée) system controls which grapes and wine-making practices can be attached to which geographical locations. Wine still plays an important role in today’s France – it’s consumed during special occasions but is also a household object. It is a gift to be offered to a new colleague or to one retiring, it is a housewarming present, a Christmas gift, a drink to be consumed with friends. Wine bars are popular, and wine in France is considerably cheaper than elsewhere (a decent bottle costs from €3-10; mid-range wine ranges from €10-25; anything over €25 is considered an expensive bottle). The Beaujolais is a popular wine region near Lyon, with hundreds of vineyards covering the area – whether you decide to hike through the vines, cycle by on two wheels, organise a wine-tasting tour (most vineyards offer this via rendez-vous, like the Sauzay Vineyard above), or even become a grape picker during the famous September harvest, experiencing both the wine and the vineyard is a great way to connect to French culture.

 

Salles-Arbuissonnas-en-Beaujolais, France (Gathering)

SallesArb

Salles-Arbuissonnas-en-Beaujolais, France

Weekly Photo Challenge: Gathering

A literal interpretation of ‘gathering,’ this photo is from the gathering of the grapes in the French wine region of Beaujolais, just north of Lyon. It happens every year, around August or September, and lasts between 1 and 2 weeks–and the harvest is no picnic. Grape-pickers must bend over and pick grapes for 8 hours a day starting around 7.30 am, with only midday, evenings, and Sundays for rest. Yet–the ambiance of the grape-picking harvest makes for an unforgettable experience. Home-cooked fantastic French meals, never-ending glasses of house wine, hanging out around the fire, playing games and telling stories, enjoying quiet, village life–all the while simply enjoying the silence. Gathering the grapes is no easy task–but it is an experience we all should have one day. You will never appreciate wine more–and never waste it again!

Salles-Arbuisonnas-en-Beaujolais, France

lesvendanges1 lesvendanges4

Salles-Arbuisonnas-en-Beaujolais, France

For many of us, the beginning of fall means chillier weather, falling leaves and pumpkins. However, for those who happen to live in or near the Beaujolais, this season means the Beaujolais Nouveau (the new wine created by the September grape harvest!). Beaujolais is known for its famous vineyards and the bottles of red wine that they produce. Rolling green hills and medieval villages greet visitors amongst labyrinths of vineyards that continue as far the eye can see. Although less well known than other French regions, the production of Beaujolais wine actually beats that of Burgundy’s wine production! Those who want to discover the beating heart of French culture, spending time on a French vineyard is arguably the best way – especially spending 1-2 weeks working as a grape-picker during the great grape harvest. The three-course meals you will eat will be rich, hearty, delicious and never-ending, levelling out with a staggering cheese-plate and pints of coffee. The fantastic, to-die-for wine comes in unmarked bottles filled up from the vineyard’s personal barrels created by last year’s grape harvesters. Evenings end in a chorus of classically French songs sung by the whole family and accompanied by accordions and saxophones, giving one the impression that you have stepped back in time to another era. So what are you waiting for? Grape-picking might not be the easiest work…but the experience will stay with you for a lifetime.