Enniskillen Castle, Northern Ireland

Enniskillen Castle Northern Ireland

Enniskillen Castle, Northern Ireland

Everyone knows of Belfast, and most have heard of Derry, but the border town of Enniskillen slips under most people’s radar. Smaller than the other two, and further south on the border with the Republic of Ireland, Enniskillen is a fascinating little place. As with most cities in Northern Ireland, it was bombed during the Troubles – in Enniskillen’s case, it happened on Remembrance Day (November 8th, 1987), and several civilians died. But that’s all in the past now. Today, Enniskillen is a thriving town, a bustling cosmopolitan centre in an otherwise rural region of Ireland, and a perfect stop for road trips from Belfast to the west coast of Sligo or Connemara and Galway. In Irish, Enniskillen means island of Cethlenn, a mythological Irish goddess, and in fact it is still known as “The Island Town.” At the centre of Enniskillen, its oldest structure is Enniskillen Castle, built in the 16th century on the foundations of a much older fortification (dating back to 1428), which came under siege several times during the Irish rebellions against British rule (including  falling to Irish rule from 1595-1602). Later, Enniskillen Castle was built up with barracks for soldiers, giving the castle the look more of a military fort. Today, the castle site hold a collection of museums on the history of Enniskillen and County Fermanagh in general, as well as the military history of the castle. Though not the most medieval castle, the border town of Enniskillen and its castle is a fascinating look at the history of the Irish border from the 1500s through the Irish Rebellion, the Revolution, the Troubles, all the way through to today and whatever Brexit holds for the future.


Pro tip: There’s a great pizzeria in Enniskillen called Little Wing Pizza – close to the castle with reasonable prices and a varied menu. Learn more about the castle visit (hours & tarifs) here. If you arrive 1 hour before closing, you’ll get a reduced price ticket. Nearby, visit a number of other castles. Explore the islands of Lough Erne – take a boat to Devenish Island, just north of Enniskillen, or White Island, further north. Both contain the ancient ruins well worth visiting. 


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Belfast, Northern Ireland

belfast

Belfast, Northern Ireland

Yes, this glittering building in Northern Ireland is different than the Republic of Ireland (Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Galway, etc). Same island, different government.  Here, they use the pound, measure things in miles, and are supposedly ruled by the Queen. Northern Ireland was created in 1921 because unlike the Republic of Ireland to the south, the majority of the population of Northern Ireland (then) wanted to stay part of the UK, as many of them were Protestants. However, the Catholics wanted a united Ireland.  Because of this religious and political divide, acts of violence rang out, including the infamous Bloody Sunday (Derry, Northern Ireland), where 26 unarmed protesters were gunned down by the British Army (14 died). It seems that most of the Catholic/Protestant violence has died down today. The Republic of Ireland doesn’t much like the queen, and still organises events to protest that the 6 northern counties haven’t yet became part of the Republic. Today’s Belfast is a small, quiet town by day, known for its nightlife, for providing the world with Van Morrison, Seamus Heaney, and Liam Neeson, and for the building of the Titanic (though this last feat is not something that I’D necessarily be very proud of!).