Trafalgar Square, London, England

London fountain

Trafalgar Square in London, England

London is one of Europe’s most beautiful and fascinating cities. At the centre of its buzzing arteries is the scenic Trafalgar Square. Named for the Battle of Trafalgar, an significant English naval victory in 1805, Trafalgar Square has been an important landmark of London since the 1300s when it was home to the Royal Mews (the alleyway where first hawks then royal steeds and their stablehands were lodged until the 19th century).  Around the time that the Royal Mews were relocated, Nelson’s Column and its accompanying lion sculptures was installed. Once again commemorating the British Navy (Nelson was an important Navy admiral), Nelson’s Column was added as a centrepiece to the newly redesigned Trafalgar Square, evoking a sense of magnitude. The fountains were added both for effect beauty as well as in an attempt to counteract the heat and glare that was reflected off the asphalt of the square. Site of countless demonstrations, it’s also one London’s busiest squares, not just for tourists but also for commuters, bikes and buses. Today, Trafalgar houses the entrance of London’s National Gallery, one of the best art museums in the word. As such, Trafalgar plays host to many art installations, Christmas trees – even a clock that counted down to the London Olympics.


Pro tip: Whether you’re an art lover or not, it’s worth a visit to the National Gallery of Art in Trafalgar Square. With an entry free of charge and a massive collection that spans hundreds (if not over a thousand) of years, it’s definitely one of London’s must see museums. Visit during the Golden Hour for the best lighting – the sunlight really plays off the stonework of Trafalgar Square. Though there are many buses that pass through Trafalgar, the easiest way is via the tube – alight at Charing Cross from either the Northern or Bakerloo lines. 


What Else to Visit in London

 

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Tower Bridge & City Hall, London

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Tower Bridge & City Hall, London, England

Amidst Brexit shenanigans, London remains both irrevocably changed as well as the same wonderful place it has always been. One thing that London does so well – and so much better than any other city in Europe – is perfectly blend the old and the new. No where else can the Globe, the Tate Modern, the Millennium Bridge and St Paul’s Cathedral sit together in perfect harmony on two sides of the mighty Thames River and seem to complement each other so perfectly. Here London is up to its old tricks again. Stroll through the ultra modern architecture of City Hall and the London Riverside to admire the light and airy glass and steel manipulated into curvy and wavy lines – which contrasts steadily with the Victorian-era and icon of English historical landmarks, London’s Tower Bridge. Built in the 1890s, this dual-functioning bridge allows pedestrians and vehicle to cross while also working as a drawbridge for passing ships and barges on the Thames. London may be a massive city but the best way to explore its nooks and crannies is by picking a direction and starting to walk – no matter how many times you visit, you never know what gem you may happen to find!


Pro tip: The Tower Bridge (not to be confused with London Bridge) is free to walk across but there is a fee of £9.80 to enter the towers (open 9.30 – 17.30) – once engine rooms and now exhibitions. 


More amazing parts of London

 

King’s Cross, London, England

London - Kings Cross railway station

King’s Cross Station, London, England

The Tube. At once iconic, eye-catching and mind-boggling, stations of the London Tube have both featured in and inspired numerous films, series and books, from JK Rowling’s Harry Potter to BBC’s Sherlock to Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere. English railways and trains, too, have long held an allure of bygone times of the golden age of railways. Though there are many stations at the heart of London’s public transit, King’s Cross is high on the list. It’s funny how something so ordinary and boring – public transportation – has now become such a powerful symbol of one of the greatest cities in Europe, but there you have it. Opened in Victorian London (1852 to be precise), Kings Cross grew quickly as London’s newfound suburbs expanded at an unprecedented rate, becoming a symbol of the neighbourhood’s prosperity at the time. By the the end of the 20th century, however, King’s Cross station had fallen into decline, and the surrounding streets known for their seedy and unsavoury character. Then in 1997 an unknown author published her debut fantasy novel about a boy wizard called Harry Potter living in a parallel magical England – accessible through Platform 9¾ from… you guessed it…King’s Cross Station. By the early 2000s, the station and area surrounding it saw a serious refurbishment – as well as a bit of marketing: a fake Platform 9¾ was constructed, complete with a half-disappeared trolley! Too bad it doesn’t actually lead to Hogwarts…


Pro tip: Platform 9¾ is popular with tourists so try to avoid peak times if you want a photo! Also, the British National Library is just around the corner if you’re feeling bookish. It’s no Hogwarts, but still beautiful! 


Other Intriguing Railway and Underground Stations

 

West Highgate Cemetery, London

London - eerie Highgate Cemetery, England Dracula inspiration

Twisted Tombs in Highgate Cemetery, London, England

One of the creepiest places in London, Highgate Cemetery is old and dark, overflowing with cracked, crooked tombstones grinning like jagged teeth and fanned with thick overgrown grass. Scattered amongst the stones are statues and stone caskets marking out the wealthier dead – even in death, social classes are made apparent. West Highgate is older, full of cracked tombstones hidden under heavy trees and dark bushes, while East Highgate (across the road) is newer, orderly, and home to the famous Karl Marx tomb (an enormous stone bust). In the overgrown Victorian West Cemetery, vicious vines grasp forgotten tombs, determined to pull their sepulchres underground, their owners’ names sanded away by centuries’ worth of wind. Highgate Cemetery was born in 1839 alongside seven other cemeteries, built to release the pressure of overcrowded intercity (and sometimes illegal) cemeteries. The dark Victorian path twists through overgrown rows of grey stones and wailing angels, leading to the obelisks of Egyptian Avenue (Victorian interest in Egypt had been piqued by Napoleon). Following that is the Circle of Lebanon, crowned with a massive ancient cedar tree older than the cemetery itself, circled by tombs seemingly revering it. Finally, the brave visitor will pass through dark, vaulted catacombs where warmth and light seem devoid. It is said that this creepy endroit inspired Bram Stoker while writing Dracula (particularly the scene at the graveyard with the undead new vampire Lucy Westenra). While this is not proven (experts suggest the mythical graveyard might’ve been St Mary’s Churchyard), there is certainly no denying the eeriness of this fiercely Victorian Gothic graveyard in north London. Get ready for goosebumps while wandering this dark and wild place where the din of London and the 21st century seem leagues away.


Pro tip: The more modern east section can be visited by all, but the most overgrown and Victorian west side is by guided tour only. It’s well worth it! 


Other Eerie Sights in Europe
  1. Fog-covered Neuschwanstein Castle, Germany
  2. Creepy ruins of Krimulda Manor House, Latvia
  3. Fire-gutted Curraghchase Manor, Ireland
  4. Angel Tomb, Highgate Cemetery, London
  5. Chateau de la Batie overlooking a cemetery in Vienne, France
  6. Eerie statues of Kiev’s grey House with Chimeras, Ukraine

 

Tower of London, England

Tower of London, England

The Tower of London as seen across the Thames River, England

The infamous Tower of London. It has a reputation for horror – death – torture. While not 100% wrong, this was the view propagated in the 16th century (did you know that only seven people were executed at the Tower of London up until the 20th century?) In fact, most executions instead took place on Tower Hill, and even then, just 112 people were executed over 400 years, a number far lower than we’d expect considering the harsh laws during the time. The dark threat of being ‘sent to the tower’ doesn’t come from Medieval times at all, but rather the 16th/17th centuries where darkness had to be hidden under the surface of polite society – so the Tower became a popular place to send unwanted royals or nobles. At one time a royal residence, a palace, a prison, a menagerie, a royal mint, a treasury and a fortified vault for the Crown Jewels, today’s Tower of London is one of London‘s top tourism destinations, and the most visited castle  (not including palaces, which are quite different) in Europe – nearly 3 million visitors cross its threshold every year. The Tower’s oldest section, the White Tower, dates back 1078; other expansions date largely to the early Middle Ages, including exertions by Richard the Lionheart, Henry III, and Edward I. All of this combined makes the Tower of London one of the UK‘s most impressive cultural heritage sites, and for this, it has been recognised by UNESCO. Due to the vast amount of visitors, it is hard to properly visit the Tower of London – best advice is to avoid school holidays and visit in the low season (late September just after school starts but before holidays begin or in the dark days of winter in January or February). Though it can never entirely escape its dark past, it may not be as dark as you thought.


Other Cool Places to Visit in London
  1. Dragon Statues
  2. Tower Bridge
  3. Highgate Cemetery
  4. Big Ben
  5. The London Eye
  6. Millennium Bridge

 

Tower Bridge, London, England

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Tower Bridge, London, England

A cold, dark evening in December in 1952, an old-fashioned double-decker bus #78 was following its route across the Tower Bridge towards Dulwich when the gateman in charge of raising and lowering the bridge failed to perceive the iconic red vehicle. He gave the all clear started to raise the bridge. The bus’ driver, one Albert Gunter, was forced to make one of those split-second, life-or-death decisions we all hope never to make – and hit the gas pedal. His bus shot forward, and the propulsion carried his double-decker bus Knightbus-style over the dark, empty expanse of the Thames far below his wheels, jumping a gap of 3 feet, onto the safety of the other side 6 feet below him, which had not yet began to rise. No one was seriously hurt, and the bus landed upright. His reward for his bravery? 10 quid from London Transport (and £35 from the City of London). Even converted to 2016 standards, that seems a little low, don’t you think!? An added bonus to the story was that one of the passengers was so scared to get back into a bus that she would only ride in Gunter’s bus, who she later asked to be her best man at her wedding! In any case, despite this incident and a few others (including an RAF man who flew a plane through below the upper walkway, and a man dressed as Spiderman who scaled a tower to dangle 100 feet in the air), the bridge remains one of London’s most beloved places, a erstwhile icon of London. Millions visit every year to photograph and traverse the famed overpass, and while there’s not much chance you’ll fly through the air like the 20 passengers on the night of Dec. 30th, the memory of your visit to the Tower Bridge will stay with you long afterwards.

London, England

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Dragon Boundrey Mark, London, England

How would you like to have a pair of dragons guarding the limits of your town? Well, that’s exactly what’s going on in the City of London (the very central part of the capital). London decided to mark the boundary of the City of London with several 6-7 foot tall dragon statues. Originally modeled on dragons perched atop the London Coal Exchange, this mighty beast is one of the two original statues from the Coal Exchange, relocated to Victoria Embankment in the mid 20th century. Dragons, like  lions, have a long history of guarding things (places, families, riches, businesses, etc) from would-be invaders. As mystical beings (not to mention big and scary), dragons have the added bonus of absolute mysteriousness, to be designed according to the vision of the creator in whatever likeness suits him best. Covered in scales, of enormous stature, and able to walk, fly, and breathe fire, it’s not hard to imagine why someone would chose this beast as their guardian and alley. Whether real or not, keep your eyes open and you might see more dragons around you than you ever realised or suspected!


More on Travel in the UK
  1. Scottish Highlands
  2. Tower Bridge
  3. Winchester Cathedral
  4. Stonehaven, Scotland
  5. Bath, England

 

Highgate Cemetery in London, England

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Unknown grave in Highgate Cemetery, London, England

Angels and demons haunt the hidden, overgrown paths of London’s infamous Highgate Cemetery. Originally one of the “Magnificent Seven,” Highgate was among seven ‘modern’ cemeteries built during the early eighteen hundreds in the London outskirts in order to alleviate overcrowding in Central London. Unlike many cemeteries kept perfectly manicured, Highgate is a wild, savage place. There is no doubt that it is also elegant–one has only to look at the grand Egyptian Avenue or the beautiful Circle of Lebanon to comprehend its splendor–but here, nature is given free reign and seems determined to take back its dead. Trees and bushes crowd the grounds, grasses and flowers cover every inch of the graves, roots grip the tombs, paths are narrow and hidden. In fact, graves are so close to each other that they are practically tripping over each other. It is both a beautiful and creepy place. One does not have to try hard to conjure images of ghosts and demons–in fact, the place is known as a possible inspiration for Bram Stoker in writing Dracula, and in the mid 1900s, it inspired the legend of the ‘Highgate Vampire.’ Though long debunked, one certainly gets goosebumps and perhaps starts to reconsider the possibility of the supernatural while wandering the forlorn paths of Highgate.

Big Ben, London, England

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Big Ben Clock Tower, London, England

Crossing the Thames and walking past the Houses of Parliament for the first time, you feel a shiver run down your spine as you finally come face-to-face with the most famous clock in the world. As Big Ben in all its glory rises above you, its clock faces grin down over the magnificent city of London. Just a hair over 150 years old, Big Ben has become one of London‘s – and England‘s – most important icons. As you stare at this tower you’ve seen in countless films, photos and paintings, you may wonder why it’s called “Big Ben” when the official name is the “Elizabeth Tower” (named like so as it was erected to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II). Apparently, the nickname’s origin is somewhat up in the air and a bit of a debate between historians. Perhaps it is because of Sir Benjamin Bell (the principle installer of the great bell)…others argue that it may be in regard to the boxing champ, Benjamin Caunt (though I’m not sure I see the likeness!?), still others argue that it should refer only to the bell and not to the tower at all. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter because as your eyes lock onto the golden sides of Big Ben’s strong tower, you still feel the shivers tingling up your spine as you stand in the shadow of so great a building. Just be mindful of that camera off to the side – London is the most surveilled city in the world, with one camera per every 11-14 people! Smile!

London, England

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London, England

How many more icons can you get into the same little photo? Here, we’ve got a red telephone booth, the London Eye, the Thames, and the Golden Jubilee pedestrian suspension bridge (in the reflection). Just around the corner, you find the centre of London: Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, 10 Downing Street. Follow the river in the other direction and you’ll find Millennium Bridge, the Globe, the Tate, Borough Market, and eventually, the Tower and Tower Bridge as well as so many other places. The River Thames really is the main artery of this great city! London is one of those places that has so many icons attached to it – leading some to say that London is “overrated” or even “boring” – but they would be terribly, horribly wrong. There is a Right Way and a Wrong Way to visit London: ie, if you stick to the “uber-tourist” itinerary, maybe you do find it “boring” and overly crowded; branch out and you’ll be surprised what gems you’ll find! You can visit London time and time again – and every time, find something new. Don’t deny it; this city really is one of the greatest cities on Earth!

London, England

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London, England

Ah, London, the capital of the world—the UK. It’s hard to think of a more – well, wonderful – place on this continent (even if its not actually on the continent, something the Brits constantly remind everyone else of!). Yes, often grey, often a bit rainy—but doesn’t that just make it all the more—London? London wouldn’t be London without its fog and rain! (That said, a sunny day in London is like a dream come true). In central London, we find the iconic London Eye (in the top right corner), not far from the infamous Houses of Parliament, usually the first stop on any London itinerary. This city, while expensive enough to make you cry, has so much to offer—life, culture, a little bit of everything. Looking for quaint, crumbling buildings on cobblestone streets? We’ve got it. You want crazy fun nightlife? Find it here. Looking for artsy, funky, hole-in-the-wall bars and cafes? Got that too. High culture? It’s everywhere. Fancy tea-houses? But of course. Grungy, dodgy bars? Uh huh. Some of the best museums you’ll ever see? Take your pick! The chance to see a real-life royal family? Come to London! Great shopping (if you’re into high-end shopping…)? Always. Literature, theatre, opera, ballet…? It’s here. Picnics in the lovely Hyde Park? Unbeatable! A chance to taste cuisine from literally any corner of the world? Come to London! …Plus, who doesn’t love the Union Jack?!

Millennium Bridge, London, England

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Millennium Bridge, London, England

Seemingly like all bridges in this city (ahem London Bridge ahem), Millennium Bridge is made famous by falling down—though to be fair to the bridge, it only fell down in the fantastical world of Harry Potter. (In case you need a refresher, the Death Eaters led by the werewolf Fenir Greyback, wanting to wreak havoc as they are wont to do, collapsed the bridge in the beginning of the 6th film). In the real world, the bridge was constructed in 1998-9 to mark (you guessed it!) the millennium. Snuggled between the Globe Theatre, the Tate Modern and St Paul’s Cathedral, Millennium Bridge is a funky steel suspension pedestrian bridge twisting and turning its way over the Thames. Its prime location means it is highly trafficked—just watch out for those Death Eaters!

London Eye, England

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Weekly Photo Challenge: On Top (London Eye)

Getting a birds-eye view of any city, mountain or anything in-between is always a rewarding experience. There is something inherently special about climbing as high as a bird, getting an entirely new perspective on the world. London is no exception. While incredibly overpriced, the view from the London Eye is no less impressive—though half the fun is watching the next little bubble rise behind you and fall in front of you. Being on top of the Eye allows you see London fold out below you—Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament are of course easy to spot, but it’s just as rewarding to squint into the distance, searching out into the far reaches of London. London is one of the most beautiful, vibrant, cultured, interesting, busy and fun cities this planet has to offer—and it’s fairly amusing to watch how the city functions from above.

 See you all in Russia 🙂

London, England

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Telephone booths in London, England

I am leaving for my move to France tonight, but as I will wake up in London tomorrow and spend the entirety of the day in this magnificent city visiting old friends and locating old haunts, I thought it only appropriate that my photo of the day be from London. And what’s more iconic than a row of red telephone booths? Designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, at one point there were more than 73,000, but their numbers were greatly reduced in past years. Yet despite this, the bright red boxes have become a shiny, crimson symbol of the United Kingdom. A trip to the UK isn’t complete without a visit and silly photo of these magical little boxes!

The London Eye, England

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The London Eye, London, UK.

At 135 meters tall, this is the tallest Ferris wheel in Europe. And it is also the most visited attraction in the UK – three and a half million people ride this wheel every year! Why? Probably because they want to see one of the most beautiful views of one of the most beautiful cities! Even in the rain – in fact, the rain makes it all the more authentic – London is one of the most majestic, lively, and interesting places on Earth, and it is one of those places that you can visit over and over again and still find something new and exciting to see each and every time.