Lublin, Poland

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Lublin, Poland

Hopefully, everyone out there is pleasantly enjoying the holiday season (snow or no snow…), and looking forward to New Year’s Eve tomorrow. For the (finally!) chilly day, let’s voyage deep into Eastern Europe, to the small city of Lublin, located in eastern Poland about 100 kilometers from  Ukraine. Very different from its western counterparts, Lublin has a long history of changing nationalities, wartime destruction and harsh climate impacts. Far less money has gone into this eastern city as western cities (such as Warsaw, Wroclaw, Poznan, and Gdansk), and it has slowly begun to fall into silent disrepair. However, much like a crumbling ruin long beloved by the 18th- and 19th-centrury artists and poets, Lublin has done so in a gracefully, romantic way. This cold, dreary little town is somehow charming because it IS a cold, dreary little town. In some ways, it feels almost more traditionally Polish than modern Warsaw or charming Poznan, than student-filled Wroclaw, or the cultural stronghold, Krakow. In some ways, it feels like taking a trip backwards through time, to another era, to another land. The winding streets and the bizarre white castle seem to be peeled off pages of an Eastern European guidebook. Everything about Lublin feels more authentic–from the thick beer to the steaming pierogies, to the soft snow to the uneven cobblestones. As the wind rustles your hair, head inside tiny restaurants for some of the best pierogies you’ve ever tasted, and reflect on the long past of this once-majestic place.

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Lublin, Poland

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Lublin, Poland

Snow falls softly on this silent, barren town. The chilly air has driven most of the locals inside and kept most the tourists away. What’s special about this place is that this little town straddles both Eastern and Western Europe. Warsaw is the political and economic centre, Krakow, the cultural capital, and Gdansk, the gateway to the Baltics. While many imagine these places as the dark and somber Eastern Europe, little by little they are becoming more and more modern, upscale, and integrated with the western half of the continent. Lublin, however, feels exactly what you’d imagine from an Eastern European town, right down to the little houses, market squares, and light snowfall. Walk its small streets, feel the snow land on your head, and duck into a local establishment for pierogies and beer!

Lublin, Poland

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Holy Trinity Chapel in Lublin, Poland.

This is Lublin Castle’s chapel, one of the few buildings to survive the destruction of Lublin’s castle. The church was built in the 14th century; however, in the 15th century, King Władysław II (pronounced “vwah-dhee-swav”) ordered the entire chapel to be covered in wall paintings. This style is very much influenced by the Byzantines, therefore, exudes an Eastern influence.  It is an extremely unique melange of Eastern and Western styles, and highly reminiscent of Orthodox churches, which cover every interior surface of their immense buildings with paintings, gilded decorations, and icons. Every painting here pertains to a biblical story and is carefully documented for visitors. It is breathtaking; one can very easily spend the allotted 30 minutes  (and more if they would allow!) staring at the paintings in this wondrous place. It’s a good thing that of all the buildings to be spared from destruction, it was this one that fate chose.