Pont du Gard, France

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Pont du Gard, Gardon (or Gard) River, France

Not many architects can say that their construction will lest centuries, let alone millennia, though many Romans can. Not many tourists can say that they have beheld constructions that are more than a millennia old, though those who have visited the magnificent Pont du Gard can. This ‘pont’ (‘bridge’ in French) over the Gard (also called the Gardon) River in the south of the Hexagon is one of the the most country’s most spectacular ancient sites, left over from the days when the Roman-dominated territory was called Gaul, and Lyon (or ‘Lugdnumum‘) was still the capital. Built around 40-60 AD spanning 275m at its longest point, the aqueduct in entirety descends only 17 m over the course of it’s length, while the Pont du Gard has a mere 2.5 centimetres slant, which makes you marvel at the ingenuity and intelligence of the Romans without computers, machinery, calculators or any other aspects of modern technology. The Pont is impressive enough when viewed from land, but the best way to truly experience such a structure is the way it was meant to be seen – by water. So, jump in a canoe or kayak, grab your paddle, splash through the Gard River and don’t be afraid to get wet!

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Rhône riverside in Lyon, France

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View of the Rhône River in Lyon, France

It’s only fitting to choose a photo of Lyon today, as the next six weeks will be spent taking a short break from France to work in rural Spain. Lyon is a beautiful city – but it is one that rarely gets put on the map. It’s also been called one of France’s “most liveable cities”–which is mostly because of the Lyonnais themselves. With roots that go all the way back to the Romans (then called “Lugdunum”), Lyon has been an important city since its founding in 43 BC largely because of its location at the confluence of the Rhône and Saône Rivers. Today, it’s regarded as France’s “gastronomic capital” – and since many consider France to rank #1 when it comes to cuisine…perhaps this means that Lyon is the #1 place to eat in the world? While that may not be true for everyone, it is true that the city has a lot to offer: local bouchons (restaurants with Lyonnais cuisine) coupled with the extravagant restaurants created by the famous chef Paul Bocuse (on the other end of the spectrum), a beautiful old town (the Vieux Lyon), the hill of Fourvière with the Roman ruins (once a great amphitheater) plus the beautiful Basilica, as well as not one but two rivers lined with quays–perfect for strolling, picnicking, biking, enjoying a beer, reading in the sun, people-watching, photographing, or simply taking in the views of Lyon by day and night. Take a step back and enjoy the views–because Lyon is one of the most underrated yet most beautiful cities in Europe!