Notre Dame Gargoyles, Paris

Paris Notre Dame Cathedral gargoyles

Gargoyles of the Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, France

After the April 14th 2019 fire, it’s not even certain if these iconic gargoyles still even adorn the amazing Notre Dame Cathedral. Even if they do, it won’t be possible to visit them until the cathedral is rebuilt… which will take years, possibly as long as two decades despite the overwhelming donations pledged (if only these sort of donations were pledged for all important monuments damaged and destroyed! Like the ancient temples of Iraq and Syria destroyed thanks to ISIS…). Notre Dame Cathedral is a special place, and the devastating fire is one of Europe’s terrible tragedies of recent times (though luckily avoiding loss of life). Built in the Middle Ages in the 12th and 13th centuries, Notre Dame is a stone building topped with a wooden roof made of strong oak from the 1200s (much of which was burned to ciders on April 14/15th). It is in this cathedral where Victor Hugo’s le bossu (or the hunchback) lived out his life in the famous book, and up until the fire, it was Paris‘s most visited monument (12-14 million each year!). Notre Dame is a symbol of Paris and France, but also one of architectural beauty, history and cultural heritage. Following the fire, this beautiful building is also a symbol of hope and resilience sitting in the centre of one of the world’s most beautiful cities. Let’s hope they rebuild it quickly, keeping in the same style as its original architects designed it… (no Pompidous, please!)


Pro tip: You can’t visit Notre Dame following the fire, but there are many other beautiful medieval structures in Paris well worth your visit, and many other great cathedrals in throughout France. Looking for gargoyles? Try Dijon Cathedral. Medieval grandeur? Lyon’s St Jean Cathedral. Simple elegance? Blois’s Church of Saint-Nicolas in the Loire Valley. 


Other extraordinary places to visit in France:

 

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Eiffel Tower, Paris, France

Eiffel Tower in Paris France - designed for 1889 World Fair

Eiffel Tower, Paris, France

This structure needs no introduction. Perhaps the most famous landmark in the world, did you know that in the beginning of its existence, the Eiffel Tower was nearly unanimously hated by artists and citizens alike? French writer Guy de Maupassant disliked it so much that he’s said to have routinely dined in the tower’s restaurant as it was the one place in Paris where the tower was not visible. Indeed. The Eiffel Tower was built over a two-year period to welcome people to 1889’s World’s Fair, the 100-year anniversary of the storming of the Bastille (fairgrounds included a reconstruction of the Bastille!). At the time, the World’s Fair was a big deal, and much like today’s Olympics, huge constructions were built to impress Fair visitors; each year’s host trying to out-do the previous host (the now-nonexistent London Crystal Palace was another famed World Fair creation as was Seattle’s Space Needle). The Eiffel Tower was France’s response. Originally meant to be demolished at the end of the Fair, it quickly became not only the symbol of the 1889 World Fair, but also the symbol of Paris, the most visited (paid) monument worldwide, and for 41 years, the world’s tallest building. Designed by Gustav Eiffel (the man who designed the interior support system of New York’s Statue of Liberty), the Eiffel Tower is still a unique, iconic and wildly-beloved monument of France and the City of Lights. France is a country resistant to fast change, but if they eventually came to love the Eiffel Tower as a symbol of fin de siècle France, hopefully the Louvre Pyramids, Centre Pompidou, and other modernist or postmodernist designs will eventually be welcomed as symbols of a modern Paris. (Or not?)


More Iconic Symbols Across Europe
  1. Tower Bridge – London, England
  2. Big Ben – London, England
  3. St Basil’s Cathedral – Moscow, Russia
  4. Brandenburg Tor – Berlin, Germany
  5. Berlin Wall – Berlin, Germany
  6. Casa Mila – Barcelona, Spain

 

Paris, France

paris tower2

Paris, France

Given the recent tragedies in the French capital this week as well as the solidarity marches happening at this very moment, it is only fitting to put the spotlight on Paris. The City of Love, the City of Lights–what can be said about Paris that hasn’t already been said? One of the most visited, photographed and expensive cities in the world, Paris makes the top of every list. From broad avenues to narrow alleys, from magnificent restaurants to cozy cafes, from style to revolution, from love to passion, from life to death, how can one describe a city that has felt and seen so much? Paris has seen the rise and fall of the Roman Empire, it has seen the expulsion of the Jews in the 14th century and later the massacre of the Protestants in 1572. It has seen the glory days of the Renaissance and the height of Impressionism. It has seen the rise and fall of Napoleon, the horrors of WWI, the blood of the French Revolution. Yet, in all that, long has it been the capital of art, culture and society. As such, the city has provided inspiration for creative souls such as Gertrude Stein, Claude Monet, F Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Oscar Wilde, Gustave Eiffel, Pablo Picasso, Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, and so many others. Paris is at the very heart of French life and culture. In wake of the recent murders at Chalie Hebdo and beyond, let us remember that through good times and bad, we’ll always love Paris.

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