Rainbows above Luskentyre Beach, Scotland

Luskentyre

Rainbows above Luskentyre Beach, Isle of Harris, Scotland

Exotic, desolate, wild, wonderful, timeless, unspoilt, empty – these are just a few adjectives that might buzz around your mind while travelling around Scotland’s Outer Hebrides islands. The Isle of Harris in particular is rugged and wild. Luskentyre Beach is perhaps one of Scotland’s most spectacular beaches – but getting here is no easy feat. Even once you’ve arrived in the Outer Hebrides (most likely by ferry from Ullapool, though there are flights to Stornaway too), you’ll have to traverse the sweeping bogs of the Isle of Lewis and the desolate mountains of the Isle of Harris before following a bumpy, narrow road to embark at Luskentyre Beach. Is it worth it? Hands down, the answer is yes! Voted Britain’s best beach, the white sands, azure waters and crescent shape look almost like a Mediterranean beach (just without the bathers!). It’s only the mild temperature and the rugged, craggy mountains rising up behind the beach that reminds us we aren’t on the Côte d’Azur! Add a full rainbow and a stunning sky – the calm before the storm – and you get utter perfection.


Pro tip: Talbert is a good base to explore Harris and Lewis. Visit the Harris Gin distillery while there, and do pick up some of the locally-woven Harris Tweed. The ferry from Ullapool – Stornaway takes 2.5 hours – see the summer timetable here – or explore their site for other options. 


More of Scotland


 

Cantabria Rainbows, Spain

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Rainbows along Cantabrian Coastline, Spain

A meteorological effect caused by the reflection, refraction and dispersion of sunlight and water, rainbows generally takes the form of perfectly-curved arcs of every colour arrayed across the sky. Often associated with Ireland thanks to Ireland’s watery, damp climate, this particularly splendid double rainbow was spotted over the Cantabrian Coast of Northern Spain. The double-rainbow effect is all the more intriguing since locals of the region often describe Cantabria as ‘reminding them of Ireland‘ – so I suppose it shouldn’t come as a surprise to find such a prominent and splendid rainbow here along the Northern Spanish coast. The region of Cantabria bears little resemblance to the rest of Spain. Hugging the Atlantic Coast, Cantabria’s weather is mild, its hills are rolling green, the air is damp, the rain is often. It is an easy region to love, but it feels very far from Spain we all expect to know, from the orange and olive groves and terracotta roofs and flamenco dancing and spicy tapas of the picturesque south. Cantabria is easygoing, tranquil, pretty, emerald. The coasts are quietly wooded, the cliffs steep and unforgiving. Villages like Santillana del Mar hold true to their medieval roots, while others, like Santoña, to their industrial roots. It is an wonderful, unhurried place of beauty and inspiration.


Other Interesting Weather Effects in Europe
  1. Solar Eclipse in Lyon, France
  2. Snowstorms in Northern Italy
  3. Glacier in Myrdal Norway
  4. Thunderstorms darken the sky in Southern Poland
  5. Hailstones in Salzberg, Austria
  6. Fires at Las Fallas, Valencia, Spain