Annecy, France

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Annecy, France

Quiet canals meander the cobbled streets of Annecy. Colors slip down the facades, floating into the canals’ ripples, drifting out into the lake. One of the cleanest in Europe, it must certainly also be one of the prettiest. The stout, stone fortress glares over the orange rooftops of its town, a citadel lost in time. Artists sell their wares – paintings, photographs, jewellery, pottery. Vendors sell ice creams and chocolates to tourists while diners chat on sunny terraces, sipping beers and lemonades. The swans swim by, searching for the forgotten crumbs that tumble in the canals. The streets ring with people taking advantage of summer in the mountains. Like a scene from a painting, Annecy’s streets merrily portray summer bliss.

 

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Lago di Braies, Italy

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Lago di Braies, or the Pragser Wildsee, Italy

Soft waves lapping on this Italian lake’s shore. In the heat of summer, lakes such as this one become an oasis for locals and tourists alike. The turquoise blue of this lake with the dramatic mountains raising up behind make Lago di Braies particularly popular. Located deep in the Dolomite Mountain range in South Tyrol, this region was originally part of Austria, hence the Germanic version of its name. Local legend has it that the south end of the lake holds a ‘gate to the underworld,’ though this hasn’t stopped the steady flow of tourists looking for an escape into nature! The lake makes a good starting point for hiking in the Dolomites. For those only there for the day, there is a pleasant walk around the lake, or you visit the lake by water, renting a rowboat to explore the lake’s edges. It;s not hard why it is sometimes nicknamed, ‘The Pearl of the Dolomites!’

 

 

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Cantal, France

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Cantal, France

One of the most rural regions in France is Cantal, located in the heart of Auvergne, central France. In fact, there are roughly as many people spread out over the Cantal region (147,000) than there are who love in the capital city of Auvergne, Clermont Ferrand (141,500)!  Located in a region known for its ‘dead volcanoes’ as the French love to say (so, dormant or extinct), much of what infrastructure that does exist is largely made from a coloured volcanic stone. Roads twist and turn, winding through cheery farms and past pleasant fields. It is a quiet place. This is the place one should come in order to seek solace, to escape from the hustle and bustle of the 21st century. Life is simply slower out here. It is the perfect escape – especially in the summer months, when temperatures are mild, and the water from local lakes and streams is perfect for swimming. Don’t miss out tasting the delicious local Cantal cheese, named after the Cantal Mountains (which give the region its name!). Made with cow milk and aged for 1-6 months, it is one of the oldest cheeses in France – dating all the back to the times of the Gauls. You won’t regret it!

Terracotta Roofs of Peñiscola, Spain

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Peñiscola, Spain

What comes to mind when you’re caught getting this birds-eye view of Spanish roofs? Lots of things: olives, fiestas, sangria, the tango, beaches, paella, terracotta, tapas, ancient architecture, the Spanish language, glasses of wine. Spain is a place that should be part of every person’s life. Take a leaf out of their cheerful, orange-y playbook and enjoy life. The Spanish comprehend the meaning of life better than most of us – perhaps not the reason we’re here, or anything that profound – but they do understand something very important that most of us routinely forget: we’ve only got one life on this earth, so why squander it doing things we don’t like? The Spanish may not understand the meaning of national debt or a strong economy, but they sure know how to eat, drink, sing, dance, travel, talk, cook and shop—at any given moment of our 24-hour day. Work comes second; life comes first. Maybe it’s not the richest country, but they sure are one of the happiest. Even though we’re not all cut out for life as a émigré Spanish person—we sure as hell are cut out for enjoying life like the Spanish.


Other Colourful Places in Europe
  1. Central Annecy, France
  2. The Berlin Wall, Germany
  3. Zagreb’s Park Josipa Jurja, Croatia
  4. Warsaw’s Plac Zamkowy, Poland
  5. The Hundretwasser House in Vienna, Austria
  6. Gdansk’s Long Street, Poland
  7. Verona, Italy
  8. Casa Batllo in Barcelona, Spain
  9. Bryggen in Bergen, Norway
  10. Nyhavn in Copenhagen, Denmark

 

Załęcze Wielkie, Poland

sunset in Zalecze Wielkie, rural Poland

Sunset over Załęcze Wielkie, Poland

Załęcze Wielkie lies in the Łódź Voivodeship (Polish province) in central Poland. It is a small village of about 20-25 buildings, and is 18km from the county’s capital of Wielun surrounded by beautiful rural countryside, rolling fields of flower and hills, ancient and sacred sites, and tiny villages. It also happens to boast Nadwarciański Gród, a small woodland campus for hosting summer camps. Every July, the village sees an influx of Americans for the The Kosciuszko Foundation, in which Polish teens can learn English at a summer Arts camp. Running through the village and park is the Warka, a river (also a beer) that is both the 3rd largest in Poland (though still small and calm enough to lazily float down), and mentioned in the national anthem. Sunsets like this are made to be enjoyed – take a step back, relax, and chill out in small chalets, roasting marshmallows and kielbasa on an open fire, and strumming guitars by as the sun dips below the horizon, leaving a stream of colour in the sky’s canvas. Sometimes, you have to go back to the basics, and watch a beautiful sun set over  a river to put everything into perspective.


More Impressive and Beautiful Sunsets in Europe
  1. Cathedral of Christ the Saviour & Moskva River, Moscow, Russia
  2. Balazuc Village, Southern France
  3. Archipelago of Stockholm, Sweden
  4. Downtown Madrid, Spain
  5. Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias, Valencia, Spain

 

L’Albufera, Spain

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The Albufera, Spain

Not far from Valencia is this freshwater lagoon and estuary.  The Albufera is 52,000 acres of  preserved wetlands. It is a bird sanctuary, marked as a Ramsar Site since 1990 and also includes larges sections that are Special Protection Areas.  Because of its proximity to Valencia, the Albufera is a place to go to escape the city. Fishing is traditionally the most important human use of the lagoon though numbers are dropping today. Therefore, pescadors will give you a relaxing ride through the lagoon in these tiny, wooden boats.  Sit back, relax, and have a good boat-ride through the duck and bird filled estuary!