Oxford, England

oxfordpuntedit

Punting in Oxford, England

What trip to Oxford is complete without donning a straw hat, getting into a flat-bottomed boat and attempting to push yourself along by digging a long pole into the River Thames? It looks wonderfully picturesque and serene–but it is surprisingly harder than it looks. Oxford, as you probably know, is home to a collection of 30+ colleges forming Oxford University, one of the world’s most foremost institutions of higher learning. Amongst all that studying, those long nights in the library, hours spent in classes or listening to speeches by esteemed professors while wearing dress robes in a banquet hall (yes, this sounds a bit like Hogwarts but it’s all true!)–all of that takes extraordinary amounts of time and energy, so for a couple of centuries, students found that they could take the edge off by grabbing a few of their best friends, ditching their dress robes, and jumping into a punt. Sometimes when they were feeling especially daring, they held races and pushed each other into the water. While the ‘sport’ may pale in comparison to bungee jumping or windsurfing, you cannot deny that it is quintessentially English. And now, on your next trip to Oxford (or Cambridge for that matter) you can see what all the fuss is about too…just try not to fall in!

Advertisements

Big Ben, London, England

big ben edit

Big Ben Clock Tower, London, England

Crossing the Thames and walking past the Houses of Parliament for the first time, you feel a shiver run down your spine as you finally come face-to-face with the most famous clock in the world. As Big Ben in all its glory rises above you, its clock faces grin down over the magnificent city of London. Just a hair over 150 years old, Big Ben has become one of London‘s – and England‘s – most important icons. As you stare at this tower you’ve seen in countless films, photos and paintings, you may wonder why it’s called “Big Ben” when the official name is the “Elizabeth Tower” (named like so as it was erected to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II). Apparently, the nickname’s origin is somewhat up in the air and a bit of a debate between historians. Perhaps it is because of Sir Benjamin Bell (the principle installer of the great bell)…others argue that it may be in regard to the boxing champ, Benjamin Caunt (though I’m not sure I see the likeness!?), still others argue that it should refer only to the bell and not to the tower at all. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter because as your eyes lock onto the golden sides of Big Ben’s strong tower, you still feel the shivers tingling up your spine as you stand in the shadow of so great a building. Just be mindful of that camera off to the side – London is the most surveilled city in the world, with one camera per every 11-14 people! Smile!