Faro de Caballo, Cantabria, Spain

santona

Faro de Caballo (Horse Lighthouse), Cantabria, Spain

Cantabria is a little-visited region on Spain’s north coast. Though on one side of the region is Basque Country and Bilbao, and the other, the famous Santiago del Compostela, few people know of the region’s existence much less add Cantabria to their Spanish itinerary. It is an out-of-the-way place categorised by mild temperatures, regular rainfall, quiet harbours and green hills. The ocean is the region’s constant companion, supporting a bustling fishing industry – notably, the anchovies of Santoña, which are world-renowned. Not far from Santoña is the rugged Monte Buciero on a spit of land that juts out into the Cantabrian Sea. At the end of the point, at the bottom of hundreds of steps carved into rugged rocky pinnacles is the squat little Faro de Caballo (Horse Lighthouse). Erected in 1863 on this forlorn outcrop of the Spanish coastline, the steps and foundations of the Faro de Caballo were placed there by prisoners of Santoña’s jail. From the 1800s to 1993, the light of Faro de Caballo shone through the waters, warning ships of the Cantabrian Coast. Today, the Faro de Caballo is part of the Las Marisma de Santoña, Victoria and Joyel Nature Park. To get there, start your hike in Santoña and walk along the coast, passing the forts of San Martin and San Carlos and following the rough path through the woods until you arrive at the steep staircase (the route is said to have some 600-700 steps, so wear good shoes!). Be sure you bring your swimming gear as well, as there are several diving ledges of varying heights as well as a swinging rope for the less-adventurous!


Pro tip: The whole hike from Santoña is about 7km, though there is another way (from the other side of the peninsula, by Berria Beach – though I feel that it is more accessible from Santoña. Don’t try to kayak there from Santoña unless there are low winds and you’re an experienced kayaker, as the winds past the headland on the way back can be rough; better to access the lighthouse on foot, bringing all necessary swimming or snorkelling gear with you!


Other cool places in Northern Spain:

Advertisements

Santoña, Spain

20110823-SantonaWharehouse-Edit.jpg

Abandoned warehouse (Former Albo Cannery) in Santoña, Spain

Arrested decay, elegant crumbling, slow fall into ruin. This little port-side town is generally off the tourist maps – and the economic charts as well. Little Santoña is known for one main export: anchovies. Its port is lined with little warehouses and canneries dedicated to anchovies such as this one – yet somehow, the warehouse district of Santoña doesn’t seem like a place to avoid. In fact, the warehouse district is actually snuggled into the ‘hip’ part of town, across from the marina and a sort of ship monument with a restaurant and look-out point on top. Though Santoña may be off the beaten path, hidden in a corner of northern Spain (which is ALSO off the beaten path!), a quick stopover on a northern Spain trek is a must. Not only does it have some of the best anchovies and affordable tapas, but it also has some of the best beaches (such as Playa Berria), ancient forts (San Carlos and San Martin), and wondrous nature (El Fraile Peak, the point with the El Caballo Lighthouse).

Santoña, Spain

santona2

Santoña, Spain

As today is my final day working in this small city in northern Spain, it seemed only appropriate to share an image of this charming seaside Spanish town. Santoña, located in the Spanish province of Cantabria, is a quiet town where one comes to hike to the top of the nearby mountain, enjoy relaxing days on the beach, drink a proper coffee on a Spanish terrace and discover the ruins of forts hanging off local cliffs. The weather more closely resembles the UK or northern France than the south of Spain, as it tends to rain a lot more than one would expect. As a result, there is life ; everything is green. Palm trees line the beach, blue skies rise over terracotta roofs. Fortresses crumble into the sea and next door, steep rugged cliffs rise out of the sea. Magic lingers on these rocky shores, and even though I’ll be gone tomorrow, the memories that follow me are magic enough.