Grenoble Old Town, France

Grenoble

Grenoble Old Town, France

Often nicknamed the ‘Gateway to the Alps’ and the ‘Capital of the Alps’ (though these are titles shared by other Alpine hubs like Chamonix and Innsbruck), Grenoble is a lovely town on the foothills of the French Alps. A university town as well as recognised hub of art, science and culture, Grenoble has a quaint old town populated with many historical buildings such as the pedestrianised and cafe-fringed Saint-André Square, the magnificent Dauphiné Parliament building tinged with Gothic and Renaissance styles, the Place de Notre Dame and its 13th century cathedral and a market square with a still-functioning daily market. In Grenoble, intrepid visitors will also find several “hôtels” or fancy houses and mansions, a fountain that has links to the French Revolution, several beautiful squares, and dozens of beautiful roads ranging from quaint alleys to grand boulevards. Overlooking the historic old town, on a backdrop of jagged Alpine silhouettes, is the impressive and impregnable Bastille of Grenoble, dating back to the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1590, during the final Wars of Religion, the leaders of the Daupiné branch of the Huguenots took over the previously-Catholic Grenoble via a 3-week siege attack. It was they, the Lesdiguières, who ordered the construction of the hilltop fortifications that would become the Bastille. Today, Grenoble remains an important cultural centre in the Alps on the edge of France, and the Bastille makes for an impressive piece of history, great views and a good workout to climb to!


Pro tip: Ok, so there is a cable car that goes up to the Bastille. But that’s cheating! Instead for the best experience, follow one of the numerous signposted paths cut into the mountain to the Bastille. The effort will make the views even more amazing! Back in town, there are many museums for you to visit, including: the Museum of Grenoble, the Archaeological Museum, Dauphinois Museum, Old Bishop’s Palace, Stendhal Museum, Museum of Isère Resistance, and more! 


Other Places in the French Alps


 

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Snowy Megève, Savoy, France

megeve

Megève, Savoy, France

Megève is the perfect European Snow Town. In fact, this little French town was conceived to be just that. Megève was actually built in the 1920s as the first purpose-built resort in the Alps, providing an alternative to the Swiss resort at St Moritz by the wealthy Rothschild family. Tucked into the French Alps in the ancient region (and once kingdom) of Savoy, it has been a popular ski resort since its conception. And yet. Despite its popularity and proximity to Mont Blanc, even despite being purpose-built, Megève still somehow manages to retain its Alpine authenticity and small-village charm, mixed with an apparent modern luxury. Megève is a fairy-tale town – wooden chalets, snow-covered pines, dramatic mountains, cosy restaurants. Unlike many modern constructions, the quaint centre of Megève was designed to stay in touch with its Alpine and Savoyard history and roots. Even when the snow is gone and the sun is shining, Megève and its beautiful Alpine environs is just as glorious in the summer – the town’s idyllic mountain setting is enough to make anyone’s heart sing.


Pro tip: Looking for comfort and luxury on your snow town ski holiday? Try the elegant 5 star hotel, M de Megève combining old world charm and Alpine cosiness with modern luxury. They also happen to have a great restaurant!


Find more quaint French villages


Lausanne, Switzerland

Lausanne

Lausanne, Switzerland

Lausanne is one of those places that usually gets overlooked in favour of its older siblings: Geneva, Zurich, Lucerne, Zermatt. And yet, this underrated Swiss city on the shores of lovely Lac Léman deserves a visit. You won’t find the classy Cartiers and Rolexes of Geneva here, nor will you find the epic skiing of Zermatt and Interlacken, nor the quaintness of Lucerne. Instead, you’ll find a city that feels authentic and lively without feeling touristy or fake. With roots that go back to Roman times (the city’s name comes from the Roman camp  Lousanna), Lausanne does not want for history – though nor is does it feel dusty and left behind. Old world charm mixes with modern buildings that parade across Lausanne’s city centre, marking the various epoques of the city. Lausanne is the capital and largest city in the Francophone region of Vaud (population 140,000). The city rests on the Swiss side of Lac Léman, facing France across the lake. Climb to the top of the hill to visit the magnificent 12th century Lausanne Cathedral, which has several important medieval features, as well as a massive and unique organ that took some 10 years to construct, and contains about 7,000 pipes! Also nearby is the Chateau de Saint Marie, current seat of the Vaud Canton government. From the top of this hill, you’ll get a lovely view of the city rooftops. Another place for great city views is the Fondation de l’Hermitage park and manor, just north of the centre. Back in Lausanne, wander through the quaint cobblestone streets of the old town before heading to the more modern part of town for a bite to eat!


Pro tip: Lausanne cuisine is similar to many other places in the ancient Savoy region. While here, be sure to try the many cheeses like Gruyere (or even visit the town of Gruyere not far away!), emmental, Swiss tomes, reblochon, Vacherin Mont-d’Or or raclette cheese (used for traditional raclette dishes), as a few examples. Also, take the train (keep in mind prices are not cheap) to the village of Montreux to visit the breath-taking Chateau de Chillon. 


Other Notable Stops in the Alps

 

Cogne, Aosta Valley, Italy

Cogne

Cogne, Aosta Valley, Italy

Possibly containing Europe’s highest density of picturesque villages, Italy is practically a fairytale land. Deep within Northern Italy’s charming and beautiful Aosta Valley is the little-known fairytale village of Cogne, perched within a now-forgotten mountain pass crossroads through the Alps. Often home to Italy’s professional cross country skiing team who come here to practice on its renowned 70 km (43 miles) of trails, Cogne village is snuggled into the Italian Alps making it an outdoor lover’s paradise. During winter, enjoy cross country skiing or perhaps downhill skiing and snowboarding. Explore the nearby valleys on snowshoes or even try your hand at ice climbing! On your way there, be sure to visit the Savoyard town of Aosta, founded by the Romans. During the summer, hike the impressive mountain trails of Gran Paradiso National Park. Inhabiting these mountains are herds of ibex, wild goats, marmots and eagles – all easy to spot while out hiking or snowshoeing. Back in town, wander the adorable streets of Cogne to admire the quaint old-world Alpine architecture. Be sure to taste the region’s delicious red wines and cheeses such as the Fontina and the Fromadzo where you’re here!


Pro tip: If you’re looking for a relaxing Alpine escape, plan a stay at the rustic wellness hotel & spa, La Madonnina del Gran Paradiso. Please keep in mind that though the road to Aosta is quite good, you’ll need to take narrow, winding mountain roads the rest of the way to reach Cogne. Not for the faint hearted! 


Visit other quaint Alpine towns:

 

Chateau de Chillon, Switzerland

Chateau de Chillon, Switzerland

Chateau de Chillon & Lac Leman, Switzerland

The water laps at the edges of this seemingly remote medieval castle as the Swiss mountains fan out behind its towers in a picture of pure fairytale. One of Switzerland’s more famous places, Chateau de Chillon is not overrun with tourists, at least not during winter. Instead, the imposing chateau sits quietly – the ideal, romantic castle. Located in the French-speaking Vaud region of Switzerland, Chillon enters written record in 1005. It was part of the ancient Kingdom of Savoy, today a melange of the French, Italian and Swiss Alps (such places like Chamonix, Chambery, Torino and Lausanne were once part of this kingdom). What started as a gatehouse to the ancient mountain pass morphed into a summer home for the dukes, then into a prison, then artillery fortress. Home first to the dukes of Savoy, then . to the Germanic Bernese and finally the Francophone Vaudois, Chillon changed hands following the rise and fall of eras. Chateau de Chillon is certainly one of the most romantic of the ancient fortresses, but it is far from the only one. The Alps are thickly peppered with such castles, each guarding strategic sites like roads, mountain passes, lakes. Today, Chateau de Chillon is like visiting a place lost in time, one that has fallen from the pages of a fairy tale.


Pro Tip: Take the train to the lovely village of Montreux and from there, walk along the lovely lakeside path for beautiful views! About 3.5 km (40 mins) from the train station. There are also cable cars and hiking trails in the mountains behind the castle, but keep in mind that accessibility is seasonal and weather permitting.


More Amazing Castles

 

Gran Madre di Dio Church, Torino, Italy

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Gran Madre di Dio Church, Torino, Italy from the Po River, Torino, Italy

Even if you haven’t yet been to Torino (if this is the case, you really should go…), you may have already beheld the Gran Madre di Dio Church if you’ve seen the 1969 classic film, The Italian Job, which tells the story of a high-stakes theft in Torino. Commissioned and built to celebrate King Vittorio Emanuele I’s return to power in 1814 following the defeat of Napoleon, the Gran Madre is a breathtaking purveyor of the briefly-popular Neoclassic style. Though perhaps exaggerated in the film, Torino is sometimes noted as the ‘cradle of Italian liberty’: it was capital of the wealthy House of Savoy (eastern France and Northwestern Italy) since 1563 as well as becoming the finally-unified Italy’s first capital in 1861. Though much of its wealth and importance (both political and economic) dissipated after WWII, Torino rests Italy’s third city – with a GDP of $58 billion, it is ranked the world’s 78th richest city (based on purchasing power)… not too shabby, eh? Not to be forgotten, the impressive neoclassic Gran Madre perched on the banks of the River Po is hardly the only piece of beautiful architecture or style in town –  Torino is also home to splendid examples of Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassical, and Art nouveau exemplars. It sports elegant and extraordinary parks, castles, palaces/palazzi, public squares, boulevards, and apartments, many of which were erected in the Golden Age of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries.Torino is a city drunk on elegance and beauty, a city that is both down-to-earth yet financially capable (that is to say, the city is indeed a wealthy one, in both looks and in vaults), and it is a city that holds true to her long heritage as a place of prestige.


Find More Beautiful Churches in Europe
  1. Fantoft Stave Church, Norway
  2. St Andrew’s Church in Kiev, Ukraine
  3. Riga Cathedral in Latvia
  4. Chesme Church in St Petersburg, Russia
  5. Teruel Cathedral, Spain
  6. Holy Trinity Chapel in Lublin, Poland
  7. Hallsgrimkirja Church in Reykjavik, Iceland 

 

Megève, France

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Megève, France

There are still some secret places in Europe where fairy tales seem to come alive and the words “Once upon a time…” seem to be the town slogan. Megève, in the heart of the French Alps, is one of those places. Megève, along with many alpine villages, seems to have fallen off the pages of a fairy tale storybook. Wooden chalets with steeply pointed roofs cluster around an ancient church. Cobblestones ring with the sound of horse hoofs and the creak of wagon wheels. A towering pine tree stands in the centre of the town square – proudly occupying the place of honor. Snug little shops, cozy cafes and sturdy lodges weave along Megève’s narrow streets. Everywhere, skiers in puffy vestments and giant boots mingle with the locals, skis in one hand, a hot chocolate in the other. Gentle snowflakes are falling, adding  to the thick, soft blanket of snow that covers everything. It is truly a magical place.

Chateau d’Annecy, France

annecy chateau

Chateau d’Annecy, France

Construction began in the 12th century on this marvelous French chateau resting on the beautiful shores of Lake Annecy. Though little is known about its beginnings, it served mainly as a residence for the nobles of Geneva for centuries. Located in the Haute-Savoie (Savoy) region of France, this chateau has long graced border of the ever-changing frontier. In fact, until relatively recently, Savoy was an independent region. It was annexed to France in 1792 under the First French Republic, was given back to the Kingdom of Sardinia 23 years later, and then alongside Nice, it became a political bargaining chip used by Napoleon and the King of Sardinia to settle the Treaty of Torin (a city with strong connections to the region)–all of which aided in the process of unifying Italy, which is pretty interesting to remark. Speaking of remarkable, did I mention that Italy was only unified in the middle of the 19th century? Rome only became the capital in 1871–making Rome as the capital of our unified, modern-day, boot-shaped Italy roughly the same age as Mark Twain’s infamous Tom Sawyer. Just something to interesting to keep in mind!