Gran Madre di Dio Church, Torino, Italy

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Gran Madre di Dio Church, Torino, Italy from the Po River, Torino, Italy

Even if you haven’t yet been to Torino (if this is the case, you really should go…), you may have already beheld the Gran Madre di Dio Church if you’ve seen the 1969 classic film, The Italian Job, which tells the story of a high-stakes theft in Torino. Commissioned and built to celebrate King Vittorio Emanuele I’s return to power in 1814 following the defeat of Napoleon, the Gran Madre is a breathtaking purveyor of the briefly-popular Neoclassic style. Though perhaps exaggerated in the film, Torino is sometimes noted as the ‘cradle of Italian liberty’: it was capital of the wealthy House of Savoy (eastern France and Northwestern Italy) since 1563 as well as becoming the finally-unified Italy’s first capital in 1861. Though much of its wealth and importance (both political and economic) dissipated after WWII, Torino rests Italy’s third city – with a GDP of $58 billion, it is ranked the world’s 78th richest city (based on purchasing power)… not too shabby, eh? Not to be forgotten, the impressive neoclassic Gran Madre perched on the banks of the River Po is hardly the only piece of beautiful architecture or style in town –  Torino is also home to splendid examples of Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassical, and Art nouveau exemplars. It sports elegant and extraordinary parks, castles, palaces/palazzi, public squares, boulevards, and apartments, many of which were erected in the Golden Age of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries.Torino is a city drunk on elegance and beauty, a city that is both down-to-earth yet financially capable (that is to say, the city is indeed a wealthy one, in both looks and in vaults), and it is a city that holds true to her long heritage as a place of prestige.


Find More Beautiful Churches in Europe
  1. Fantoft Stave Church, Norway
  2. St Andrew’s Church in Kiev, Ukraine
  3. Riga Cathedral in Latvia
  4. Chesme Church in St Petersburg, Russia
  5. Teruel Cathedral, Spain
  6. Holy Trinity Chapel in Lublin, Poland
  7. Hallsgrimkirja Church in Reykjavik, Iceland 

 

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Chateau d’Annecy, France

annecy chateau

Chateau d’Annecy, France

Construction began in the 12th century on this marvelous French chateau resting on the beautiful shores of Lake Annecy. Though little is known about its beginnings, it served mainly as a residence for the nobles of Geneva for centuries. Located in the Haute-Savoie (Savoy) region of France, this chateau has long graced border of the ever-changing frontier. In fact, until relatively recently, Savoy was an independent region. It was annexed to France in 1792 under the First French Republic, was given back to the Kingdom of Sardinia 23 years later, and then alongside Nice, it became a political bargaining chip used by Napoleon and the King of Sardinia to settle the Treaty of Torin (a city with strong connections to the region)–all of which aided in the process of unifying Italy, which is pretty interesting to remark. Speaking of remarkable, did I mention that Italy was only unified in the middle of the 19th century? Rome only became the capital in 1871–making Rome as the capital of our unified, modern-day, boot-shaped Italy roughly the same age as Mark Twain’s infamous Tom Sawyer. Just something to interesting to keep in mind!