Cottage near Stratford-upon-Avon, England

Stratford upon avon

Thatched cottage in Stratford-upon-Avon, England

It’s washing day in this quintessential English thatched cottage lost in the English woodland. The air is steeped with the smell of soap and fresh laundry, hung outside to dry outside this cottage on this sunny English day, making you feel as though you’ve fallen into a fairy tale. This magnificent thatched cottage stands in a quiet meadow in the English countryside not far from the quaint but bustling town of Stratford-upon-Avon. Best known for being the birthplace of the great writer William Shakespeare (who did wonders for the English language, by the way; we still use words and phrases coined by him), Stratford-upon-Avon is crossed with medieval streets lined with Tudor houses and never-ending shops, spires of ancient churches and tolling church bells. Avoid the crowds by instead meandering through the brilliant English countryside where you’ll stumble across quiet pastures and thatched cottages. Thatch, once a common roofing material, is rare today, owing to the amount of maintenance required (you must replace it every few years), the overabundance of other roofing materials and the fact that it’s a significant fire hazard. Here though, you’ve stepped straight into a fairy tale. There is something very magical about this cottage in this place – as if fairies or forest nymphs or singing maidens may tumble off the pages of a storybook and come to life here. In this place, wandering these quiet countryside lanes outside of Stratford-upon-Avon, you can see where Shakespeare took his inspiration. Alone on the path by the cottage, you may even expect to meet one of Shakespeare’s colourful characters along the way.


More Fairy Tale Inspiration in Europe
  1. The Little Mermaid, Copenhagen, Denmark
  2. The Rose of Turaida, Latvia
  3. Turrets and Towers in Carcassonne, France
  4. The Fairytale Town of Bruges, Belgium
  5. Legendary Queen Maeve’s Tomb in Ireland
  6. Fairytale Alpine Villages in the French Alps
  7. Gnome Statues in Wroclaw, Poland
  8. Magical Canals of Strasbourg’s Petite France
  9. King Arthur & Avalon: Glastonbury, England
  10. Sleeping Beauty’s Castle: Neuschwanstein, Germany

 

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Verona, Italy

Verona

Verona, Italy

Typically known to be a place of vibrant colors, here is another perspective of the famed Italian city. Known as the scene of Shakespeare’s immortal Romeo & Juliet, Verona is more than a city of doomed lovers. (It is also the namesake of “Two Gentlemen in Verona,” and the setting for “The Taming of the Shrew.” Ha!) Verona is a city of architecture, a city of color, of history. It is a city that has ties to the Romans, to Dante, to Shakespeare. Nestled along the Adige River, the cobbled streets of Verona twist and turn along the river’s banks. In fact, it was this convergence at the river’s bend and intersection with several main roads that led to Verona’s growth during the Roman Empire. Over the next 2,000 years, it changed hands too many times to count (some of the most important were the Romans, Ostrogoths, Lombards, Bavarians, the counts of San Bonifacio, the della Scala family – who seems to have turned on each other several times with treason, betrayal and fratricide – Venetians, Napoleon, Austrians, the Nazis, and finally, present-day Italy). It is a city steeped in history, a city that, though you would not know it from its appearance, has maintained a strong military presence due to its strategic position for most of its existence.

Verona, Italy

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Verona, Italy

“In fair Verona where we lay our scene…” says the famous Prologue of Romeo and Juliet. Even though William Shakespeare never set foot in the Italian city, it is still Verona’s main claim to fame, and thousands of tourists–mostly fans or lovers–flock to Casa Guilietta, or Juliet’s House, from Shakespeare’s ultimate love story. Whether it’s to tour the house, call down from her balcony, take a photo with her (lucky?) statue, or write a love message on one of the blank walls, Juliet and her love are still alive and well in Verona. But don’t let that be the only reason to visit–Verona is a truly charming, beautiful city that dates back long before Romeo and Juliet fell in love–all the way to the Romans. Tiny pizzerias and cafes serving Italian coffee are on every corner. The piazzas are buzzing with life, the sun shines gently on the cobblestones, vibrant markets sell anything from vegetables to furniture to cheese, and everyone–students, tourists, locals–all stop to chat in the street while sipping an elegant espresso. Even if Will never saw the city, he got one thing right… Verona is certainly ‘fair!’