Lough Gur, Ireland

Lough Gur

Castle of Lough Gur, Limerick, Ireland

“6,000 years of human life.” Stop and think about that for a second, and try to imagine that. 6,000 years. That’s older than the Pyramids of Giza. That’s long before the Romans – the Romans are practically modern compared to that! Same goes for the Greeks. The Middle Ages were practically last week compared to that! The Renaissance? The Reformation? Victorian times? The world wars. Yesterday. 6,000 years ago, Lough Gur was a-bustle with human life. Evidence of everything from the Neolithic era through the Bronze Age, Iron Age, Early Christian, Medieval, Early Modern and Modern eras has been found around Lough Gur. It is an area awash in mythology, and dotted with archeology – from ancient Neolithic times through to much more recent eras. For instance, the fortified towerhouse Bourchier’s Castle (closed to visits), is decidedly medieval, built by the now-extinct Earls of Bath. There are ringforts in the area, Neolithic tombs and even Ireland’s largest stone circle. Amazingly, Lough Gur is also home to one of the most amazing finds – a complete Bronze Age Yetholm-type shield. The county and  city of Limerick, neither of which are likely on most people’s ‘must-visit’ list, has been making great strides to reinvigorate its streets and slightly-unsavoury reputation, and the county has plenty to offer – including the wonders of Lough Gur.


Pro tip: Visit the website for opening times. There is a copy of the sheild at the Lough Gur Heritage Centre (which is small, and includes a small fee); the original is on display at the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin (free entry). This museum is well worth visiting even beyond the shield!


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Dingle Peninsula, Ireland

Hiking Dingle Peninsula, Kerry Ireland

Dingle Peninsula, Co Kerry, Ireland

Ah, beloved County Kerry. One of everyone’s favourite places to visit in Ireland must be the Dingle Peninsula. Rugged, green and just a bit wet, this peninsula encapsulates Ireland in miniature. From cheery towns and snug pubs to emerald fields and fierce coastlines, the Dingle Peninsula is deserving classic. If you want to explore it off the beaten path, hike part or all of the Dingle Way, a 179-km trail that circumnavigates the Dingle Peninsula and brings you to Dingle’s wild side where one will be privy to some of the greatest coastal landscapes in all of Europe! Though flat enough, at the interior of the Dingle Peninsula is Mt Brandon, where St Brendan the Navigator is said to have seen the ‘promised land’ and inspired his seven year’s Voyage of St Brendan. At any rate, a trip to Slea Head, Ireland’s westernmost point, is a must for gorgeous coastal panoramas. Next stop? North America!


Pro Tip: From the local harbour, catch a boat to the desolate Blasket Islands, evacuated in the 1950s due to harsh weather conditions, to get a glimpse to what Ireland was like in the past. 


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