Castle of Zahara de la Sierra, Spain

Ronda Castle

Castillo de Zahara de la Sierra in Andalucia, Spain

Andalucia is a dry, sunburnt land in the south of Spain. The region is among Spain’s largest and most populous regions, with small communities spread out over a blanket of brown hills, jagged mountains and rolling fields. Many such communities are part of the Pueblos blancos or ‘white villages’ of Andalucia, picture-perfect villages beloved by tourists. This particular pueblo blanco, Zahara de la Sierra, is tucked away in the Sierra Nevada mountains and overlooked by the Castillo de Zahara de la Sierra. The castle dates back to the Moorish era of Spain. During the early Middle Ages, Spain was inhabited by the Moors, broadly defined as muslims originally from the Maghreb living in southern Europe, who greatly influenced Spanish art and architecture and even language (Andalucia, for example, comes from Al-Andalus) until finally being driven out completely by the 1490s. Very little remains of this once-impressive fortification in the village of Zahara. Today, all that’s left are the vestiges of a few walls and a signal tower, which, once climbed, will provide stunning views of the cheery white-washed walls and orange roofs of Zahara, the azure waters of the local reservoir, the sun-kissed chocolate-coloured fields hugging the village, all the way out to other nearby villages. Though beautiful, it is evident to see why this may not always have been an easy place to live. The castle, and the village below it, is carved into a rugged, rocky outcrop, with heights ranging from 300m to 1100m, and the village’s name “zahara” comes from “sahra” meaning desert. The seemingly-romantic sun-kissed fields, rocky outcrops and windswept panoramas may be seem idyllic today, but life in such a dry and remote place (it’s 100 km from the sea after all) wouldn’t always have been so perfect!


Pro tip: There’s a lovely wee restaurant with a comfortable terrace perfect for people-watching called El Rincon De La Ermita


 More Places to Visit in Spain’s Countryside


 

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Santillana del Mar Archway, Spain

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Santillana del Mar Archway, Spain

Though not actually located on the sea despite its name, Santillana del Mar is one of northern Spain’s loveliest hidden spots. In fact, it is nicknamed the ‘Town of Three Lies’ as it is not on the sea (mar), nor is it flat (llana) or a saint (santo). More accurately, the name is a slightly-mangled derivation or Santa Juliana, whose final resting place is tucked away here in an ancient monastery. The cultural hub of Cantabria, don’t expect to have this medieval masterpiece to yourself – not that that diminishes from the sheer beauty or culinary pleasures! A medieval marvel, Santillana del Mar is a charming stone village in the north of Spain that exudes beauty on every street. Known for its cider, Santillana del Mar, like most of Spain, is a place to slow down, relax, and enjoy the finer things in life such as food, drink, fresh air, sunshine and conversation. Whether you’re people watching, spending time with friends or loved ones, or simply admiring the architecture, Santillana is a place to lose yourself, leaving the busy real world behind.


Pro tip:  Just outside of the town is the famed Altamira Cave Painting site, rich with prehistoric art. And as stated above, be sure to try some of Santillana del Mar’s local cider while in town!


Other Great Places to Visit in Northern Spain


 

Andalucia Farmlands, Spain

 

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Farmlands in rural Andalucia, Spain

Andalucia is one of Europe’s most enchanting places. Vast tracts of farmland stretch to the horizon, dotted with snug farmhouses tucked among the golden and chocolate-coloured foothills. Rugged landscapes colour the foreground while the jagged spires of the Sierra Nevada Mountains set the backdrop. Beautiful Andalucia is home to the famous pueblos blancos, the magnificent white villages peppering the golden brown hills of southern Spain. In this region, time seems to slow to a standstill. People take time to live their lives slowly, to appreciate the simple joys of everyday. Groves of oranges and olives climb the sunburnt slopes until they finally disappear over the hill crest. The over-abundance of oranges and olives, not to mention tomatoes, grapes, almonds, cereals, and sunflowers is evident – pop-up open air markets are everywhere, in each village. Old wooden tables  groan under the weight of the fresh produce – aficionados of the farm-to-fork movement at its purest! Vineyards, too, abound in Andalucia and further afield in Spain. It’s easy to find good yet cheap wine (no need to ever spend more than €10 per bottle…). Better yet, enjoy a cold glass of delicious sangria while basking under the Andalucian sun in villages like Grazelama, Zahara de la Sierra, or the town of Ronda. There are a lot of incredible places to watch a sunset, but the green and golden checkered fields, bone-white villages and rugged landscapes – not to mention the cloudless skies – make for some pretty spectacular performances. Best enjoyed with a sangria in hand…of course.


Other Lovely Rural Destinations in Europe
  1. Lodzkie Voivodeship in Southern Poland
  2. Auvergne’s Rural Cantal Region, Central France
  3. Coastal Cantabria in Northern Spain
  4. Gauja River Valley, Central Latvia
  5. English Countryside outside Stratford-upon-Avon, England
  6. The Scottish Highlands, Northern Scotland
  7. Winding Roads in Western Norway

 

Andalusia, Spain

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Andalusia, Spain

Under blue skies and over brown earth, crooked trees rise up from a sandy hilltop somewhere deep within the Andalusian region. This southern part of Spain is wild and hilly, rough and desolate. Yet, it has its own type of rugged beauty. Small Pueblos Blancos (White Villages) dot the hills, ancient farms climb the steep hillsides, windy roads wrap themselves around the mountains, narrow streams wiggle through the sands, scraggly trees push up through the dry earth–and over all, the bright Spanish sun shines down over her beautiful realm. Once you arrive in a place like Andalusia, you never want to leave!

Isla, Spain

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Isla, Spain

Spain is old. You won’t get far in Spain without stumbling upon a castle, a manor house, an old church, a crumbling ruin, a stonewall. Villages like Isla are not uncommon, but this makes them no less beautiful. Leaving behind any major Spanish city and setting out into the countryside is always an adventure, and it nearly always yields beautiful results. This manor house, private and closed to the public, is a good representation of the type of houses that once housed the ruling classes in the countryside. The neighbouring village, Isla, is a quaint place comprised of little shops and restaurants, pretty houses, an attractive stone church and a picturesque castle tower overlooking all at the top of the hill. The orange roofs and crumbling stone buildings swim in a sea of golden countryside and blue skies. Just down the hill, one leaves the Middle Ages behind for the modern era and the beach. While not as famous as its neighbour, Playa Noja, a beach known for its surfing (as well as its proximity to a maximum security prison, a fact that is oddly fascinating), Playa del Sable is still a great place to kick back and relax with sun, sand and a glass of Spanish sangria!

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Andalusia, Spain

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Andalusia, Spain

Tumbling hazel hills rise and fall along this Spanish road in Spain’s southern-most, most populous, and second-largest region, Andalusia. Blazing hot during the day, chillingly cold during the evening, Andalusia is as bizarre as it is beautiful. While tints of green fleck the landscape (as seen here), there is an overwhelming difference between these rolling hills, and similar such hills just on the other side of the Pyrenees. Andalusia has a rugged sort of beauty that is sometimes difficult to understand at first….but the more time spent in this warm, dry part of southern Spain, the more delicious dishes you try, the more fun, happy Spaniards you meet, the more adorable villages you discover, the more realise there’s no place like Andalusia!