The Riva – Split Harbour, Croatia

Split Harbour, Croatia

The Riva Waterfront of Split Harbour, Croatia

In most cities, the harbour, or “the docks” district is one of the least favourable parts of town – rough, rundown, dirty, overgrown, a bit forgotten. In Split however, this is not the case. One of Croatia’s loveliest cities (home to the amazing Diocletian’s Palace, the dramatic Marjan Hill, the stunning Trg Republike square, and a labyrinth of beautiful, winding streets), Split’s harbour and waterfront, called the Riva, is a charming promenade and one of Split’s loveliest places. The Riva was born some 200 years ago the French of Napoleon’s time lived there, though it has changed face and form several times over. Today home to an inundation of cafes, restaurants and bars, it is the throbbing heart of modern Split. And yet the Riva does not forget its maritime past, with piers, boat slips, customs houses and Port Authority buildings new and old framing the waterfront. The Riva is snuggled up behind the famous Diocletian Palace, ancient churches and an important monastery overseeing modern and traditional waterfront activities.


Pro tip: The Riva can be quite a busy place at all hours of the day, though it is at its liveliest in the evenings. Climb the nearby Marjan Hill for spectacular views over the harbour and watch the boats as the come and go. 


Other lovely waterfront views in Europe

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Old Town of Split, Croatia

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Split, Croatia

Vivid colours are one thing that Split does not lack. Turquoises and azures, cerulean and sapphire – blues of every shade – are the principle colours associated with this ancient Croatian city, as the Mediterranean laps gently against the city’s feet – but there are other colours too. Pinks sprout from Trg Republike (Republic Square), both from its beautiful stone walls as well as the  bright flowers that encircle the cafes. Oranges – in the way of clay tiles – dress the roofs of the ancient city (much like in Dubrovnik). And greens decorate the walls, here in the way of brightly-painted shutters, elsewhere via luxurious palm trees and other exotic vegetation that fans Split’s streets, contrasting against the somber stone. In any case, Split is a city of vibrant life and colours!


Other Lovely Mediterranean Places To Visit

 

View from Marjan Hill, Split, Croatia

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Split, Croatia

Look at that colour! These deep, cobalt blue waters belong to Croatia’s coast along the Adriatic Sea, the body of water dividing Italy from Croatia. This little Balkan country has been drawing attention over recent years as the place to be during summer! Perhaps a bit over-crowded, the country does not want for beauty. From ancient ruins (such as the Diocletian Palace in Split), to delicious food and wine to rival Italy’s cuisine, to an incredible coastline easy to experience by boat, to friendly locals who can’t wait to show tourists their culture, all the way to the unbelievably blue waters such as those above, Croatia seems to be blessed. And what better way to visit than by boat? Whether you take a small tourist “island-hopping” boat, a cruiser that travels up and down the coastline, an immense Mediterranean cruise ship or even a ferry from Italy or Albania, Croatia must be experienced via the water. And if you do visit Split, be sure to climb the little hill called Marjan just outside the city centre, as the view from the top is to die for!

Zagreb, Croatia

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Zagreb, Croatia

This little Croatian capital has a challenge competing with Croatia’s beautiful Dalmatian Coast cities, its lovely beaches and its magnificent national parks. And yet, this offbeat inland capital has its own charm. It sports a downtown full of cafes and restaurants, decorative spires rising above the rooftops, statues that pop up in unexpected places. Meandering quirky streets carries you among adorable shops that surround the traditional old town. Regal palaces now converted into museums and institutions line the avenues shooting out of the centre. Colours slide off the facades of houses and palaces alike. When the sun is shinning, people stroll down the streets, lounge in the parks and drink a cold, local beer on sidewalk tables. Brides in wedding gowns pose for photo-shoots and students picnic in the grass. Though the beach is far away, and Zagreb is neither as beautiful as Dubrovnik or as historic as Split, it is still well worth the time to stop by this little Balkan capital!

Dubrovnik, Croatia

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Dubrovnik, Croatia

10 years ago–hell, 5 years ago–Croatia didn’t make the map. Today, a lot has changed; Croatia is now one of the most popular destinations for tourists from both Europe and abroad. Why? Well, with a view like this, what’s not to love? Cheery orange roofs, rugged rocky outcrops, sandy beaches, palm trees, pizzas, dramatic fortresses perched on cliffs, prices cheaper than Italy but with a view of the same Adriatic Sea. Out of all former states of Yugoslavia, the EU’s newest member has come the farthest. Dubrovnik, who shares the title “Croatia’s Crown Jewel” with Split, is one of Europe’s busiest “cities.” While this influx of travelers has been great for the Croatian economy, it also means that you should expect to see large numbers of tourists while visiting these two cities. However, in between, you will find smaller–but no less beautiful!–places such as Hvar, Brac, Bisevo, Sipan, Trogir. No matter what, Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast is to die for!

Trg Republike, Split, Croatia

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Trg Republike, Split, Croatia

Republic Square, or Prokurative as it is known locally, is Split’s magnificent (and largest) of public squares. Because of its Neo-Renaissance style and usage of Venice as a model, walking through Trg Republike is like stepping into Venice. And it’s not only this square that one has the feeling of being in Italy—Croatia and Italy share a long history dating back thousands of years. Located just across the Adriatic Sea from Italy, Croatia was geographically located at the centre of the Roman Empire. This proximity bound the Dalmatians to the Venetians—who were regarded as the Mistresses of the Adriatic—as they shared both culture and language. Today, though Croatia and Italy are two separate countries speaking languages from two separate language families, the pair have much in common: architecture, food, weather, lifestyle, landscape. Yet still, even with all of these superficial similarities, the people still hold onto their own traditions, their own uniqueness, their own culture—and Croatia is a country worth getting to know.