Luskentyre, Isle of Harris, Scotland

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Luskentyre, Isle of Harris, Scotland

The Isle of Harris feels like the end of the world. And that’s saying something, because Scotland is already a remote place. To get from Edinburgh to this forgotten corner of Harris, it’ll take you at least 3 hours to Inverness, another hour and a half to the ferry at Ullapool, at least 2 hours on the boat, and another hour or more to reach Luskentyre. Lonely, windswept and overlooked, Luskentyre feels very much like land’s end, despite its beautiful beach. It’s hard to imagine humans living here, and yet they did, and they do. You’ll still see evidence of olden day crofts – narrow strips of land provided to poor farmers for subsistence farming. Evidence too of middens (ancient piles of discarded seashells) and lazy beds (beds of kelp used to make vaguely fertile earth which, despite their name, was backbreaking work). Further north on the Isle of Lewis, find an ancient stone circle made of giant monoliths impressive enough to rival Stonehenge, Iron Age brochs (defensive structures), long-forgotten lighthouses, and the remains of blackhouses, named so from the staining they sustained from peat smoke. From the gentle rolling bogs of Lewis to the rugged mountains of Harris, this place feels inhospitable yet hauntingly beautiful. Today, there are small villages scattered about Lewis and Harris, and about 21,000 people still call these remote, connected islands home.


Pro tip: Talbert is a great base to explore the Isle of Harris. Get yourself some Harris Tweed, head over to Harris Distillery, and then hop off to hike the Hebrides. Up for a challenge? Try summiting An Clishan, the highest in the Outer Hebrides. Or something easier? Hike from Dalmore Beach to Garenin Village. Or walk along stunning Luskentyre Beach! 


Other Stunning Places in Scotland


 

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Cantabria Rainbows, Spain

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Rainbows along Cantabrian Coastline, Spain

A meteorological effect caused by the reflection, refraction and dispersion of sunlight and water, rainbows generally takes the form of perfectly-curved arcs of every colour arrayed across the sky. Often associated with Ireland thanks to Ireland’s watery, damp climate, this particularly splendid double rainbow was spotted over the Cantabrian Coast of Northern Spain. The double-rainbow effect is all the more intriguing since locals of the region often describe Cantabria as ‘reminding them of Ireland‘ – so I suppose it shouldn’t come as a surprise to find such a prominent and splendid rainbow here along the Northern Spanish coast. The region of Cantabria bears little resemblance to the rest of Spain. Hugging the Atlantic Coast, Cantabria’s weather is mild, its hills are rolling green, the air is damp, the rain is often. It is an easy region to love, but it feels very far from Spain we all expect to know, from the orange and olive groves and terracotta roofs and flamenco dancing and spicy tapas of the picturesque south. Cantabria is easygoing, tranquil, pretty, emerald. The coasts are quietly wooded, the cliffs steep and unforgiving. Villages like Santillana del Mar hold true to their medieval roots, while others, like Santoña, to their industrial roots. It is an wonderful, unhurried place of beauty and inspiration.


Other Interesting Weather Effects in Europe
  1. Solar Eclipse in Lyon, France
  2. Snowstorms in Northern Italy
  3. Glacier in Myrdal Norway
  4. Thunderstorms darken the sky in Southern Poland
  5. Hailstones in Salzberg, Austria
  6. Fires at Las Fallas, Valencia, Spain

 

Gdansk’s Green Gate, Poland

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The “Green Gate” of Gdansk, Poland

Until very recently, controlling a port meant power. In fact, this is still the case in many ways considering that about 90% of world’s trade is still carried by the international shipping industry. Long before the invention of the airplane – and before that, the train and the truck – shipping was the method of transport. European powers have been obsessed with finding trade routes to Asia for hundreds of years (inspiring the famed Columbus voyage in 1492… as well as others), going so far as to construct the Panama and Suez canals. During the 15th and 16th centuries, the Russians (who occupied central Russia at the time) had control only of a few northern (and frozen!) ports. Baltic ports were controlled largely by the Lithuanian Empire, or by powers centralized in Riga and Tallinn. The Hanseatic League as well controlled much of the trade in North, Eastern and Central Europe. Russians had staggering amounts of natural resources – but few ports, thereby instigating the struggle for control of the Baltic Sea. Though Gdansk, located in northern Poland on the Baltic Sea, was not controlled by the Russians, other powers (German, Lithuanian, Teutonic Knights…) have their histories mingled with that of Gdansk. Indeed, the Baltic city has been an influential port for nearly a 1,000 years! Today, the Polish city is still an important port, not to mention a hub for Poles on holiday in search of the sea. It is also one of the best places in the world to purchase amber!


Pro tip: Some of Gdansk’s most photogenic and picturesque spots is in the Long Market, bookend-ed with the Green Gate (that’s actually pink…) leading to the waterfront on the other side. 


Travel to Other Beautiful Places near the Baltic Sea
  1. Malbork Castle, Poland
  2. Riga, Latvia
  3. Tallinn, Estonia
  4. St Petersburg, Russia
  5. Stockholm, Sweden
  6. The Baltic Sea