London, England

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London, England

How many more icons can you get into the same little photo? Here, we’ve got a red telephone booth, the London Eye, the Thames, and the Golden Jubilee pedestrian suspension bridge (in the reflection). Just around the corner, you find the centre of London: Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, 10 Downing Street. Follow the river in the other direction and you’ll find Millennium Bridge, the Globe, the Tate, Borough Market, and eventually, the Tower and Tower Bridge as well as so many other places. The River Thames really is the main artery of this great city! London is one of those places that has so many icons attached to it – leading some to say that London is “overrated” or even “boring” – but they would be terribly, horribly wrong. There is a Right Way and a Wrong Way to visit London: ie, if you stick to the “uber-tourist” itinerary, maybe you do find it “boring” and overly crowded; branch out and you’ll be surprised what gems you’ll find! You can visit London time and time again – and every time, find something new. Don’t deny it; this city really is one of the greatest cities on Earth!

Millennium Bridge, London, England

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Millennium Bridge, London, England

Seemingly like all bridges in this city (ahem London Bridge ahem), Millennium Bridge is made famous by falling down—though to be fair to the bridge, it only fell down in the fantastical world of Harry Potter. (In case you need a refresher, the Death Eaters led by the werewolf Fenir Greyback, wanting to wreak havoc as they are wont to do, collapsed the bridge in the beginning of the 6th film). In the real world, the bridge was constructed in 1998-9 to mark (you guessed it!) the millennium. Snuggled between the Globe Theatre, the Tate Modern and St Paul’s Cathedral, Millennium Bridge is a funky steel suspension pedestrian bridge twisting and turning its way over the Thames. Its prime location means it is highly trafficked—just watch out for those Death Eaters!