Tower Bridge & City Hall, London

london-bridge

Tower Bridge & City Hall, London, England

Amidst Brexit shenanigans, London remains both irrevocably changed as well as the same wonderful place it has always been. One thing that London does so well – and so much better than any other city in Europe – is perfectly blend the old and the new. No where else can the Globe, the Tate Modern, the Millennium Bridge and St Paul’s Cathedral sit together in perfect harmony on two sides of the mighty Thames River and seem to complement each other so perfectly. Here London is up to its old tricks again. Stroll through the ultra modern architecture of City Hall and the London Riverside to admire the light and airy glass and steel manipulated into curvy and wavy lines – which contrasts steadily with the Victorian-era and icon of English historical landmarks, London’s Tower Bridge. Built in the 1890s, this dual-functioning bridge allows pedestrians and vehicle to cross while also working as a drawbridge for passing ships and barges on the Thames. London may be a massive city but the best way to explore its nooks and crannies is by picking a direction and starting to walk – no matter how many times you visit, you never know what gem you may happen to find!


Pro tip: The Tower Bridge (not to be confused with London Bridge) is free to walk across but there is a fee of £9.80 to enter the towers (open 9.30 – 17.30) – once engine rooms and now exhibitions. 


More amazing parts of London

 

Advertisements

Tower Bridge, London, England

LondonTower-Edit.jpg

Tower Bridge, London, England

A cold, dark evening in December in 1952, an old-fashioned double-decker bus #78 was following its route across the Tower Bridge towards Dulwich when the gateman in charge of raising and lowering the bridge failed to perceive the iconic red vehicle. He gave the all clear started to raise the bridge. The bus’ driver, one Albert Gunter, was forced to make one of those split-second, life-or-death decisions we all hope never to make – and hit the gas pedal. His bus shot forward, and the propulsion carried his double-decker bus Knightbus-style over the dark, empty expanse of the Thames far below his wheels, jumping a gap of 3 feet, onto the safety of the other side 6 feet below him, which had not yet began to rise. No one was seriously hurt, and the bus landed upright. His reward for his bravery? 10 quid from London Transport (and £35 from the City of London). Even converted to 2016 standards, that seems a little low, don’t you think!? An added bonus to the story was that one of the passengers was so scared to get back into a bus that she would only ride in Gunter’s bus, who she later asked to be her best man at her wedding! In any case, despite this incident and a few others (including an RAF man who flew a plane through below the upper walkway, and a man dressed as Spiderman who scaled a tower to dangle 100 feet in the air), the bridge remains one of London’s most beloved places, a erstwhile icon of London. Millions visit every year to photograph and traverse the famed overpass, and while there’s not much chance you’ll fly through the air like the 20 passengers on the night of Dec. 30th, the memory of your visit to the Tower Bridge will stay with you long afterwards.

Big Ben, London, England

big ben edit

Big Ben Clock Tower, London, England

Crossing the Thames and walking past the Houses of Parliament for the first time, you feel a shiver run down your spine as you finally come face-to-face with the most famous clock in the world. As Big Ben in all its glory rises above you, its clock faces grin down over the magnificent city of London. Just a hair over 150 years old, Big Ben has become one of London‘s – and England‘s – most important icons. As you stare at this tower you’ve seen in countless films, photos and paintings, you may wonder why it’s called “Big Ben” when the official name is the “Elizabeth Tower” (named like so as it was erected to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II). Apparently, the nickname’s origin is somewhat up in the air and a bit of a debate between historians. Perhaps it is because of Sir Benjamin Bell (the principle installer of the great bell)…others argue that it may be in regard to the boxing champ, Benjamin Caunt (though I’m not sure I see the likeness!?), still others argue that it should refer only to the bell and not to the tower at all. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter because as your eyes lock onto the golden sides of Big Ben’s strong tower, you still feel the shivers tingling up your spine as you stand in the shadow of so great a building. Just be mindful of that camera off to the side – London is the most surveilled city in the world, with one camera per every 11-14 people! Smile!

London Eye, England

on top1on top2

Weekly Photo Challenge: On Top (London Eye)

Getting a birds-eye view of any city, mountain or anything in-between is always a rewarding experience. There is something inherently special about climbing as high as a bird, getting an entirely new perspective on the world. London is no exception. While incredibly overpriced, the view from the London Eye is no less impressive—though half the fun is watching the next little bubble rise behind you and fall in front of you. Being on top of the Eye allows you see London fold out below you—Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament are of course easy to spot, but it’s just as rewarding to squint into the distance, searching out into the far reaches of London. London is one of the most beautiful, vibrant, cultured, interesting, busy and fun cities this planet has to offer—and it’s fairly amusing to watch how the city functions from above.

 See you all in Russia 🙂