Bridge in Prior Park, Bath, England

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The Palladian Bridge in Prior Park, Bath, England

England is a lovely place; Bath is even lovelier. Ancient Roman baths, Gothic abbeys, picturesque canals, charming cobblestones, Georgian architecture, amazing bridges and green parks come together to make one of England’s loveliest cities. It helps too that Bath was home to one of England’s most influential writers, Jane Austen, and it featured in many of her stories (notably Persuasion and Northanger Abbey). On the other side of Bath’s canal, meandering forest trails wind through the grounds of Prior Park and its Palladian house built in the mid-1700s as a way of displaying the use of Bath limestone as a potential building material. The house, as well as this bridge nestled deep into the park’s hillsides, was built following the style imbued by 16th-century Italian architect Andrea Palladio, whose rigid classical style briefly became popular in the UK during the mid 17th- and 18th-centuries before being cut short by the Civil War. Palladio valued lines, symmetry and perspective – the ultimate version of Neoclassical architecture. Inspired by the Greeks and Romans, Palladio derived a style that adapted the symmetry of Roman temples and palaces to a more modern manor house. Today owned by the Prior Park College and the National Trust, Prior Park is one of Bath’s hidden gems and well worth the countryside stroll!


Pro tip: No car? Save your walking for when you get to the park. The No. 2 bus runs every 30 mins (from BK on Dorchester Street), though you can indeed walk – its about 20-30 mins from the city centre. Check their website for up-to-date opening info as well as events and festivities happening in the park during your visit. Looking for more walking? The lovely canal you crossed to get to Prior Park is a beautiful place to walk or jog. 


More of Bath and its Environs


This article was originally posted in 2015. It has since been updated.  

 

Autumn Foliage in Parc Tete d’Or, France

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Autumn Foliage in Parc de la Tete d’Or, Lyon, France

Though far from its only park, le Parc de al Tete d’Or is certainly Lyon‘s premier public park. Though lovely all year round, Parc de la Tete d’Or holds a particular charm during the transitional seasons. Spring is full of blooming flowers while autumn bursts into fall  flame of foliage. During autumn, the whole park erupts into a patchwork quilt of golds, oranges, reds and yellows, making it a lovely place for a romantic stroll, a quiet picnic, a lovely jog or even a nice place to walk the dog. Translating as “the Park of the Golden Head,” it is supposedly named for a legend claiming that a golden Christ’s head is buried here. Founded in 1845 after much call for an urban park, the Parc de la Tete d’Or encompasses 117 hectares (almost 300 acres). Within these acres, find an outdoor zoo, botanical gardens and a great glasshouse, a rose garden, a lake with several island, sports facilities, children’s playgrounds, and kilometres of trails lined with trees, gardens, sculptures and cafes (bonus – everything in the park is free!). There are paddleboats on the lake (better to look at then to actually use), and even a little train (also best avoided). Running groups use this as a place to swap urban scenes with beautiful landscapes – if you’re looking for a longer run, follow the Rhone river north of Tete d’Or to connect with the Parc de la Feyssine. No matter when you visit, the Parc Tete d’Or is sure to impress!


Pro tip: Don’t miss Boulevard des Belges, a grand avenue running parallel to the park’s southern side. Lined with grand and beautiful hotels or mansions dating from the last two centuries, Boulevard des Belges has long held a reputation as the most expensive street to live on in Lyon – rent upwards of €2,500/month! Crane your head upwards to view all of the architecural detail. On the northern side is Interpol HQ. Housed in a modern complex near the Musée d’art Contemporain, it may not be much to look at, but it’s a pretty cool place behind the scenes… 


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Clifton Observatory, Bristol, England

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Clifton Observatory, Bristol, England

Starting life in 1766 as a corn and then snuff mill, the Clifton Observatory clings to the edges of the steep ribboned slopes of the Avon Gorge. Sliding into the muddy River Avon (itself quickly emptying into the massive Bristol Canal separating England and Wales, the Avon Gorge streaks through a limestone ridge about 3 miles from the mouth of the river at Avonmouth. The Observatory is not alone in its defence of the Avon Gorge; alongside it, there are the ancient remains of no less than three Iron Age forts. Clifton Observatory was nearly gutted by fire in the 1770s; later left to fall into ruin. The building was only saved in 1828 when artist William West rented the picturesque site as a studio. It was West who installed the famed camera obscura as well as a set of telescopes, together used to detail the Avon Gorge and the lush Leigh Woods that adorn the opposite bank. Even more fascinatingly, West also spent two years carving out a 200 foot long tunnel from the Observatory to St Vincent’s Cave (also known as the Giants’ Cave due to a myth claiming it was once home to giants called Goram and Ghyston), suspending visitors some 250ft above the valley floor and offering fantastic panoramas of the gorge. Although once associated with the ancient chapel of St. Vincent, before the tunnel was built, the only access was from below – the route Lake Poet Robert Southey took in his whimsical descriptions of the place in the 18th century. Whether you visit the camera obscura and the cave or just take a turn about Clifton Down and admire the views from above, it is certainly one of Bristol’s best kept secret gems.


Pro tip: £4 gets you into the Observatory. Get some air in the beautiful Leigh Woods Reserve (maintained by the National Trust) on the opposite side of the Gorge. On the way back, wander through the quaint streets of quirky Clifton, perhaps stopping for delicious Italian at Bosco’s pizzeria.


More Beautiful Places to Visit in England outside of London