Chiesa di San Giorgio, Verona, Italy

Verona cathedral

Church (Chiesa) di San Giorgio in Braida, Verona, Italy

As is typical of Italy, the Italian city of Verona is simply full of churches – the Chiesa di San Giorgio is just one such church. More than the others though, the Chiesa di San Giorgio’s location along the River X makes it all the more stunning, helped along by its beautiful Baroque dome. The San Giorgio in Braida Church was built in the 16th century in a medieval part of the city just along the riverbank, a stunning addition to the orange-tiled roofs and narrow alleys that make up the rest of Verona. On the opposite riverbank are the Roman ruins – there is the remains of an old amphitheatre here. Though large, it is far from the best preserved example, though still interesting to see. The city of Verona is probably best known for its Shakespearean connection – though ironically the play with the city name in the title – The Two Gentlemen of Verona – isn’t the one that will come to most minds. No, what Verona is most remembered for as home to Romeo and Juliet – and there is even a balcony that is supposedly the Juliet balcony in the Casa di Guillietta or Juliet’s house. All in all, Verona is a quiet and lovely place, a true Italian city. Not too far from Venice but with far fewer crowds, it is a welcome respite from the popularity and business of other Italian cities – without sacrificing the charm!


Pro tip: Apparently it’s good luck to touch the statue of Juliet at Casa di Guillietta, but it’s a bit of an odd tradition and no point waiting for a break in the crowds to do so. Though different, Verona can be a nice alternative to Venice (or at the very least, a nice breather after the crowds of the archipelago!). 


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Verona, Italy

Verona

Verona, Italy

Typically known to be a place of vibrant colors, here is another perspective of the famed Italian city. Known as the scene of Shakespeare’s immortal Romeo & Juliet, Verona is more than a city of doomed lovers. (It is also the namesake of “Two Gentlemen in Verona,” and the setting for “The Taming of the Shrew.” Ha!) Verona is a city of architecture, a city of color, of history. It is a city that has ties to the Romans, to Dante, to Shakespeare. Nestled along the Adige River, the cobbled streets of Verona twist and turn along the river’s banks. In fact, it was this convergence at the river’s bend and intersection with several main roads that led to Verona’s growth during the Roman Empire. Over the next 2,000 years, it changed hands too many times to count (some of the most important were the Romans, Ostrogoths, Lombards, Bavarians, the counts of San Bonifacio, the della Scala family – who seems to have turned on each other several times with treason, betrayal and fratricide – Venetians, Napoleon, Austrians, the Nazis, and finally, present-day Italy). It is a city steeped in history, a city that, though you would not know it from its appearance, has maintained a strong military presence due to its strategic position for most of its existence.

Verona, Italy

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Verona, Italy

“In fair Verona where we lay our scene…” says the famous Prologue of Romeo and Juliet. Even though William Shakespeare never set foot in the Italian city, it is still Verona’s main claim to fame, and thousands of tourists–mostly fans or lovers–flock to Casa Guilietta, or Juliet’s House, from Shakespeare’s ultimate love story. Whether it’s to tour the house, call down from her balcony, take a photo with her (lucky?) statue, or write a love message on one of the blank walls, Juliet and her love are still alive and well in Verona. But don’t let that be the only reason to visit–Verona is a truly charming, beautiful city that dates back long before Romeo and Juliet fell in love–all the way to the Romans. Tiny pizzerias and cafes serving Italian coffee are on every corner. The piazzas are buzzing with life, the sun shines gently on the cobblestones, vibrant markets sell anything from vegetables to furniture to cheese, and everyone–students, tourists, locals–all stop to chat in the street while sipping an elegant espresso. Even if Will never saw the city, he got one thing right… Verona is certainly ‘fair!’