Natural History Museum, London, England

London museum

Natural History Museum, London, England

The Natural History Museum is one of London‘s preeminent and established museums. Founded using the collections of 17th/18th century collector Sir Hans Sloane, the Natural History Museum was originally part of the British Museum (though formally separated in 1963). It is home to five main sections or types of scientific collections: botany, minerals, zoology, entomology (ie bugs), and finally palaeontology over an impressive 80 million artefacts! The building itself was built later in the Victorian gothic and Romanesque styles in South Kensington, and was finished in 1880. With reminisces of European cathedrals, abbeys and palaces, the amazing Natural History Museum building is as much a wonder as its collections both inside and out (in fact, the architect freely admitted that his designs were inspired by his long travels throughout the European continent). As an interesting design quirk, the building uses architectural terracotta tiles (to resist the dirt and soot of Victorian London), many of with contain imprints of fossils, flora and fauna, reflecting the building’s use. It is an amazing place to visit and learn while in central London.


Pro tip: The museum is free, and normally open daily from 10-17h30. It’s usually busy, but the lack of entrance fee means no lines. We recommend starting at the top to come face to face with the gigantic blue whale, and making your way down from there. It’s also near the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Science Museum. Alight at Gloucester Road or South Kensington. 

Miss museum-going during the pandemic? Visit museums virtually! Take a look at the extensive online collections of the British Museum (recommend to listen to exhibits) or these other museums on this list.


More of Victorian London & Nearby


 

Tower Bridge & City Hall, London

london-bridge

Tower Bridge & City Hall, London, England

Amidst Brexit shenanigans, London remains both irrevocably changed as well as the same wonderful place it has always been. One thing that London does so well – and so much better than any other city in Europe – is perfectly blend the old and the new. No where else can the Globe, the Tate Modern, the Millennium Bridge and St Paul’s Cathedral sit together in perfect harmony on two sides of the mighty Thames River and seem to complement each other so perfectly. Here London is up to its old tricks again. Stroll through the ultra modern architecture of City Hall and the London Riverside to admire the light and airy glass and steel manipulated into curvy and wavy lines – which contrasts steadily with the Victorian-era and icon of English historical landmarks, London’s Tower Bridge. Built in the 1890s, this dual-functioning bridge allows pedestrians and vehicle to cross while also working as a drawbridge for passing ships and barges on the Thames. London may be a massive city but the best way to explore its nooks and crannies is by picking a direction and starting to walk – no matter how many times you visit, you never know what gem you may happen to find!


Pro tip: The Tower Bridge (not to be confused with London Bridge) is free to walk across but there is a fee of £9.80 to enter the towers (open 9.30 – 17.30) – once engine rooms and now exhibitions. 


More amazing parts of London