Vilnius, Lithuania

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Vilnius, Lithuania

The crisp, cool air flows through the ancient alleyways of Vilnius on this winter’s day in this little Baltic nation. Little streets criss-cross Lithuania’s capital city, creating a maze of quiet streets largely ignored by the jet-setting tourists partying in the centre. This elderly gentleman walks his dog along the outside of the ancient stone wall that once surrounded and protected Vilnius from the outside world, the narrow track between the wall and the row of houses serving as a quiet pedestrian route. Despite being Lithuania’s largest city – and the Baltic State’s second-largest city – once you leave the bustling centre to weave the winding network of streets, alleys, and rivers (the broad Neris and the easy-going Vilnia both flow through the capital), Vilnius adopts a surprisingly small-town feel. Charming facades, orthodox churches painted in pastels, quiet riverside promenades and echoing cobblestone alleys are frequented largely by locals, creating a calm but cheerful atmosphere that mixes small-town ease with the vivacity of a European capital – a mix that is hard to find in most of Europe’s capitals and major cities.


More About Travelling in the Baltic Countries

  1. Trakai Castle, Lithuania
  2. Riga, Latvia
  3. Gauja River Valley & Turaida Castle, Latvia
  4. Tallinn, Estonia
  5. Northern Baltic Coast

 

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Vilnius, Lithuania

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St Casimir’s Church, Vilnius, Lithuania

This pink church is the first and oldest Baroque church in the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius. Built 1604 to 1635, it was dedicated to the patron saint of Vilnius, Prince Casimir Jagiellon from the lat 15th century. For its relatively small size, Vilnius seems to have an awful lot of churches. Baroque towers with intricate facades and gilded tips, orthodox churches with fancy Cyrillic writing, Gothic churches covered in spires. Red brick facades or painted in pastel colors, Vilnius’s churches are beautiful, tranquil, non-imposing. They seem nature, as if they are exactly where they are supposed to be. For an often-overlooked city, Vilnius has plenty of charms up its sleeves. It will never beat Tallinn (one of Europe’s most beautiful cities),  or Riga, an Art Nouveau masterpiece. Yet, there is still something very special about this beautiful Baltic gem!

Vilnius, Lithuania

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Gediminas Hill in Vilnius, Lithuania

Once part of Vilnius’ defensive system, this green lump rising from the centre of the Lithuanian capital is Gediminas Hill, one of Vilnius’ major landmarks. A short walk up the winding path takes you to what is left of the tower, which in part dates back to the 10th century. From there, one can see the Hill of Three Crosses–meaning that if you descend Gediminas Hill, meander through the Old Town to the base of the second one and climb the wooded path up that hill, you are rewarded with a panoramic view of the Gediminas Hill. Surrounding this ancient hill is the Old Town, a mix of styles and colours. You are currently in the heart of Lithuania. But just beyond that, you see the rest of Vilnius, the impacted of the Soviet-esque sky-rises and concrete towers. It is an interesting contrast of old and new, of Lithuanian independence and Soviet influence, and it’s a beautiful spot for quiet reflection. After enjoying the sunset over the hills, descend into town to enjoy another important aspect of Lithuanian culture…a beer in a local pub!

Vilnius Cathedral, Lithuania

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Vilnius Cathedral, Lithuania

Neoclassicism.  What an invention. Back in the mid-18th century, a resurgence of Greek and Roman architecture became a la mode. The opposite of the naturalistic Rococo style, Neoclassicism strove to return to the “purity” of Greek and Roman styles, mirroring their symmetry, geometric design and perspective. The famous Italian architect Andrea Palladio played an instrumental role with the construction of his famous albeit peculiar Villa Capra “La Rotonda,” which he based on Roman temples and other similar designs. One of the most striking creations to come out of this architectural period is the Vilnius Cathedral, circa 1783, located in central Vilnius. One doesn’t normally imagine a Catholic cathedral in the capital city of an Eastern European country to resemble an ancient Roman temple—but there you have it, and there it is – see for yourself. Lithuania is full of surprises!

Hill of Three Crosses, Vilnius, Lithuania

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“Trys kryžiai” or, The Hill of Three Crosses, Vilnius, Lithuania

Designed by Polish-Lithuanian artist, Antoni Wiwulski (the borders changed so frequently that a mixed nationality is common) in 1916, these concrete crosses in Kalnai Park overlook the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius. They were torn down in 1950 by the Soviets (who else…), and only reinstated in that monumental year of 1989 by Henrikas Silgalis. The site has a history of crosses dating back to 1636, and legend has it that they were erected in memory of 7 Franciscan monks were tortured to death in 1333 by local pagans. Another version stars two murdered friars, killed in 1340 by the charming Duke of Lithuania Gediminias (who gave name to the tower which the Three Crosses overlook). No one really knows why the Three Crosses were built—but two things are certain: one, the Crosses are a monument that stirs memories of a nation’s resilience, and two, the view from the hill is unbeatable!