Snagov Monastery, Romania

Snagov church Romania

Snagov Monastery, Romania

These seemingly-quiet church spires rise up through the lush gardens of the tiny Snagov Island, in the centre of a small lake of the same name. It is purported that this silent little place is actually the final resting place of Vlad Ţepeş, more commonly known by his legendary nickname, Vlad the Impaler, or even more infamous, Dracula. A personage made famous by Irish writer Bram Stoker, a scholar and writer who never stepped foot on Transylvanian soil, the vampire Dracula is based on the story of the brutal and bloodthirsty Wallachian prince, Vlad Ţepeş, who spent most of his life doing two things – one, fighting against the encroachment of the Ottoman Empire, and two, impaling people. A lot of people – hence the nickname. There has been a church on Snagov Island since the 11th century, with the monastery founded in the 14th century during the reign of King Dan I ( which was from 1383–86), and finally the construction of a stone edifice in 1453, which was later improved into the present-day structure. Supposedly the monks at Snagov were particularly partial to Vlad Dracul – in keeping with “Christian” values, Vlad helped fund the monastery in return for absolving his sins, or so the old story goes. When Dracula finally died, beheaded in 1476 while fighting his long-time enemy the Ottoman Turks, Vlad Ţepeş was interred here (well, most of him was, excepting his head which was carried on a spike back to Istanbul). Though no one knows if this is actually true or that the body here is indeed Vlad, it is true that there’s a monument to Vlad Ţepeş here at Snagov, and people come from miles around to visit the final resting place of the most famous almost-vampire in Europe.


Pro tip: Snagov is on the way from Transylvania to Bucharest. Follow the signs to the monastery through a neighbourhood where there is a car park (expect a small fee), then cross to the island via the footbridge. There are also boats across the lake if you prefer the traditional method, costing you perhaps 100 lei. At certain times of year, there are roadside vendors selling fresh produce such as strawberries – much more delicious than anything you’ll find in the supermarket!


More of Romania


 

Peles Castle, Romania

Peles-Castle

Peles Castle, Romania

One of Europe’s most fascinating Renaissance castles can be found tucked away under the Carpathian Mountains that march across the mysterious and beautiful country of Romania. Amongst Romania’s most famed sites, Peles Castle is actually a neo-Renaissance fortress. Built on what was once an important trade route linking Wallachia and Transylvania – Romania’s two principal trade regions – Peles Castle was inaugurated in 1883, making it one of Europe’s younger castles. Inside and out, expect grandeur, over-the-top luxury, and a clear exertion of King Carol I’s power. Peles Castle and the Alpine-esque resort town of Sinaia came about in the late 1800s when King Carol of Romania fell in love with the dramatic mountain scenery. It was under King Carol that Romania gained its independence (1877). The king wanted a regal yet original mountain resort, rejecting anything that wasn’t grand and unique. In the end, he went for German architect Johannes Schultz’s proposal, a grand palatial Alpine castle that combines the most distinctive and appealing features of classic European castles, including styles born of the Italian and later German Renaissance.  In a way, this approach to locating the very best of European castles makes Peles Castle all the more fairytale!


Pro tip: Peles Castle and nearby resort town of Sinaia can be quite touristy – best to visit in the off season if possible. Take a stroll around the grounds of Peles Castle at sunset – the views will be stunning, and as the castle is closed at that hour, you’ll have the estate to yourself. 


Other Neo Renaissance Fairytale Castles of Europe Built to Impress
  • Neuschwanstein Castle – similar to Peles, this castle was built in the 1800s by a king looking for a regal and quintessential fairytale castle
  • Kreuzenstein Castle – This castle is actually a hodgepodge of different castles, imported and re-constituted together after the original building was destroyed
  • Chateau de Chenonceau – One of the many chateaux of the Loire Valley, Chenonceau stretching over the river is the picture of elegance.
  • Chateau de Chambord – Another Loire Valley chateau, this massive castle takes the concept of royal hunting lodge to the extreme.