Dijon, France

Dijon, mustard, wattle and daub, medieval, middle ages, architecture, France, Europe, Burgundy, Bourgogne

Dijon, France

X marks the spot – or maybe it just marks a row of charming houses in Dijon, built in the infamous wattle-and-daub style. But what really is wattle-and-daub anyway? In use as a construction method for some 6,000 years (and still popular today due to it being low-impact technique), such buildings are created by weaving a braid of wooden strips called wattle, then daubing them with a sort of caulk made of soil, clay, sand, straw, and other ingredients. Thick wooden beams are then factored in as supports to the structure, and together, they form sturdy, isolated walls. Sustainable and relatively easy to do, houses erected in this style are also just so charming. DijonStrasbourg, Stratford-upon-Avon, many Germanic villages and more exude such charm because of the high predominance of wattle-and-daub structures. Charming and beautiful, it would seem that fairy tales are alive and well in Dijon – one can just imagine one of those windows popping open and Belle or Rapunzel smiling out!

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Strasbourg, France

Strasbourgw

Maison Kammerzell, Strasbourg, France

Featuring the best Christmas markets in France, some of the prettiest wattle-and-daub architecture in the country, and long-time home to the famous Gutenberg, Strasbourg is not a city to be ignored. In the centre of town, there is the famous Strasbourg Cathedral. And next to its famous cathedral, there is a little wooden house. And this little wooden house is pretty special. See, it’s the one of the oldest–and most ornately decorated–medieval buildings featuring Gothic architecture still alive and well today. As it was built in 1427, this little wooden house is pretty old–and still functioning today! Because of Strasbourg’s proximity to Germany and Rhineland (in fact, throughout the city’s history, it frequently changed back and forth between France and Germany). Now French (though historically, German Renaissance), this little wooden draws queues of visitors every year!