Vineyard of Robert Sauzay, Beaujolais, France

Vineyard in Beaujolais, France

Vineyard of Robert Sauzay, Salles-Arbuissonas-en-Beaujolais, France

Wine has always been an important part of French culture, and French wine has always been an important part of the wine industry. Dating back to 6th century with the colonisation of southern Gaul (notably, Marseille), viticulture took hold in France, who made the act of wine production an art, integrating it deeply into their culture. Many grapes you’ve heard of (such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Pinot noir, Sauvignon blanc, Syrah, etc.) have their roots (literally!) in France – because the ancient Gauls practised a new technique allowing them to increase production: they pruned their vines. Since then, various groups preserved the art of wine-making: the Romans, medieval monks, the French nobility. Today, France is still a top wine producer.Here, wines are identified by the vineyard, chateau, manor, village, monastery, etc. where the alcohol is produced (not by the grape itself). This is known as the ‘terroir’ (linking wines to production location – exe. see Tain l’Hermitage). The AOC (Appellation d’origine contrôlée) system controls which grapes and wine-making practices can be attached to which geographical locations. Wine still plays an important role in today’s France – it’s consumed during special occasions but is also a household object. It is a gift to be offered to a new colleague or to one retiring, it is a housewarming present, a Christmas gift, a drink to be consumed with friends. Wine bars are popular, and wine in France is considerably cheaper than elsewhere (a decent bottle costs from €3-10; mid-range wine ranges from €10-25; anything over €25 is considered an expensive bottle). The Beaujolais is a popular wine region near Lyon, with hundreds of vineyards covering the area – whether you decide to hike through the vines, cycle by on two wheels, organise a wine-tasting tour (most vineyards offer this via rendez-vous, like the Sauzay Vineyard above), or even become a grape picker during the famous September harvest, experiencing both the wine and the vineyard is a great way to connect to French culture.

 

Tain l’Hermitage, France

20130103-Chapoutier vonyard__AuroraHDR_HDR_0.jpg

M. Chapoutier Vinyards, Tain l’Hermitage, France

M. Chapoutier, one of the most famous vineyards along France’s Rhone River is located in Tain l’Hermitage, about a half an hour south of Lyon, in what it called the Cotes de Rhone region. Cote Rotie, Crozes Hermitage, St Joseph, Ermitage, Cornas, Chateauneuf-de-Pape, Condrieu, Cotes de Rhones Villages are just a few of their wine types, and within these, many more brands and types. In France – one of the most important wine-producing regions in the world – wine is everywhere. And it it is cheap. A bottle of Crozes-Hermitage here costs anywhere between 7 – 15€ (depending on the type), but the same type/brand of wine in the US can cost upwards of $12 a glass! Therefore, it is easy to drink decent wine without going broke, and Chapoutier wines are, in fact, pretty decent. And because good wine is cheap and accessible, nearly everyone knows their way around wine. To be a wine connoisseur (a French word, you may notice…) in France, you have to be REALLY knowledgeable; an ordinary French person would seem like an expert in the US!  And another interesting fact is that in the US, the wine is named after the grape (chardonnay, syrah, pinot noir or gris, etc) but in France, wine is named after the town, region, village or castle where it is produced, meaning you have to be even MORE knowledgeable (and even have some notion of geography!) to pick your wines. Chapoutier-produced wines are the kinds of local wines, along with the wines of the Beaujolais, that you find in and around Lyon. And if you visit the vineyard, be sure to do a tour, and a tasting to increase your French wine knowledge!

Anse, France

anse

Anse, France

Finally back in France after a summer abroad, it’s time to start re-posting in order to fall in love with Europe again, one photo at a time. This here is Anse, a lovely French town plopped in the middle of the famous region, the Beaujolais, well-known both in and outside of France for its superb red wines. Small enough to be quaint but large enough to feel alive, Anse and the surrounding countryside is a welcome break from the hustle and bustle of Lyon, France’s 2nd-biggest city. No need to worry about traffic on the highways or paying 5-6 euros for a drink at a pub–life is far simpler in Anse. Whether you prefer to tramp through the breath-taking countryside (all the while taking in views of French vineyards!), wander the ancient streets imagining bygone times, eat at local family-owned eateries, or do a little wine-tasting yourself, Anse is the place to be! And at a mere 30-kilometer trek from Lyon, there’s really no excuse not to go!