House with Chimaeras, Kiev, Ukraine

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House with Chimaeras, Kiev, Ukraine

Imagine walking through a city such as Kiev. It is months before war is thought of, and there is an element of peace still wafting through the air. Despite this–despite its magnificent cathedrals and fine buildings on its main street, there is still an air of desperation, a slight tugging at one’s side. Square, concrete buildings remind one of the war, which like many other cities in Eastern Europe–destroyed large chunks of the city and had to be rebuilt quickly and cheaply. Imagine grey skies overhead, as you hurry through the rain. Imagine you turn a corner and stumble upon the President of Ukraine’s office. Imagine turning around just as the rain relents–and coming face to face with this. This dramatic house, which for the past ten years has been used for diplomatic ceremonies, looks as if it popped up from a (rather dark) storybook. It is the House with Chimaeras. The name does not relate to the mythical animal, but rather the architectural style in which a building is adorned with animal sculptures. Look closely–and you will see nothing but animals! Whales, frogs, elephants, rhinos, deer, eagles, fish, serpents–you name it, it’s probably there. Italian architect Emilio Sala redesigned the house after original architect Vladislav Gorodetsky, who was an avid hunter, was forced to sell it. I suppose this is one way to pay homage to one’s hobbies–albeit an excessive one!  Despite–or perhaps a result of–its prestigious address, important guests and strange decor, the house remains one of the strangest, creepiest, most bizarre yet most important buildings in all of Kiev and beyond.

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St Andrew’s Church, Kiev, Ukraine

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Андріївська церква, or, St Andrew’s Church, Kiev, Ukraine

In light of Kiev‘s recent, rather negative ascent to the spotlight, I thought I’d turn tables and show the beautiful side of the Ukrainian capital. Here is St Andrew’s Church (which also happens to be my favourite church I’ve so far visited), reaching for the heavens with its beautiful bejewelled turquoise dome. According to legend, St Andrew had planted a cross on this exact site, proclaiming that one day, it would be the site of a ‘great Christian city.’ Not exactly a cathedral, St Andrew’s namesake is no ordinary church either. Commissioned by the famous Catherine the Great, built by the famed Italian architect Bartolomeo Rastrelli who had a penchant for extravagance and opulence (architect of St Petersburg‘s Winter Palace and Smolny Cathedral), and named for St. Andrew, the patron saint of Kiev, St Andrew’s Church was constructed in the years 1747-54 in Baroque style. However, for some reason, Catherine wasn’t pleased, and poor Rastrelli was fired. Apparently, she had no taste for beauty because today, Андріївська церкваone is one of the most beautiful buildings not only in Kiev, but in the entire continent.


Other Orthodox Churches in Eastern Europe
  1. St Basil’s Cathedral, Moscow, Russia
  2. Savoir on Spill Blood Cathedral, St Petersburg, Russia
  3. St Panteleimon Cathedral, Kiev, Ukraine
  4. Aleksander Nevski Katedraal, Tallinn, Estonia
  5. Nativity of Christ Cathedral, Riga, Latvia

 

St. Michael’s Golden-Domed Monastery, Kiev, Ukraine

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St. Michael’s Golden-Domed Monastery, Kiev, Ukraine,

or, Михайлівський золотоверхий монастир

It’s like fairyland, no? Overlooking the Dnieper River in central Kiev and facing down its beautiful sister, St Sophia, this magnificent piece of architecture is actually a functioning monastery. Though built in 1108-1113, it was demolished in 1934-1936 (three guesses who destroyed it…), and not rebuilt until 1999. So really, it’s only the site that’s old, not the cathedral itself. If you’ve never been to an orthodox cathedral, prepare for jaw-dropping beauty, both inside and out. Hershey-kissed shaped golden domes top its exterior towers, and inside, well, prepare for walls covered floor-to-ceiling in intricately-painted pictures and paintings. Golden walls and impressive idols line the alter. The whole interior is seems massively never-ending, and its acoustics are amazing; it’s like you’ve stepped into another world! Buildings like this make you appreciate the artistic capabilities of humanity all over again.

Cathedral of St. Panteleimon, Kiev, Ukraine

kievCathedral of St. Panteleimon, Kiev, Ukraine

After having seen the orthodox cathedrals in Kiev – wildly colourful, crazily textured, beautifully gilded, onion-dome topped, with every inch carefully painted, I will never look at a cathedral the same way. Western cathedrals, while impressive and beautiful, rarely stand out from each other. But Eastern Orthodox cathedrals – each one is a separate work of art, each one is different, unique.  This is St. Panteleimon’s, built in Russian Revival design between 1905 and 1912, so it is not terribly old in comparison with other religious structures in Europe.  Some say it resembles the Nevski Cathedral in Tallinn – and there is some resemblance! St. Pan’s was intended to serve as a branch of St Michael’s Golden-Domed Monastery, but was closed and looted in WWII. Today, it is only a hollow shell which has been restored as the main church of a nunnery. It rests in the quiet, suburban park of Feofaniya (getting there is tricky because the Ukrainians don’t post bus signs or if they do, they are in Cyrillic. From M. Libidska take bus 11 or 156 to the last stop) on 1.5 km2 acres of land. It makes a lovely backdrop for an afternoon stroll!