Balazuc Rooftops in Ardeche, France

Medieval village of Balazuc, Gorges d'Ardeche, France

Bird’s Eye View of Balazuc, Ardeche, France

The tiny French village of Balazuc snuggled deep within the timeless county of Ardèche is a place you go to lose yourself in another era, another way of life. Sun kissed hills are woven with ancient villages, a patchwork of medieval architecture fused seamlessly with the brown earth and golden fields of southern France. Balazuc is one of such places. A veritable labyrinth built of golden stone, the village’s narrow alleys wind up and down, dipping half-underground, through other buildings, around and through the hills in a completely random and at times mysterious manner. Hole-in-the-wall cafes dot the facades, and a hilltop castle and church duo seem to be trying to outdo one another. To access the steep hilltop village, one must first cross a surprisingly high bridge over the Ardèche River – not a bad place for a quick dip! And just a stone’s throw away is the equally-beautiful and heart-throbbingly medieval village of Largentière as well as the ever-impressive Gorges d’Ardeche. Get ready for a coup de foudre – French for love at first sight!


Other Amazing Medieval Villages in Europe
  1. Kazimierez Dolny, Poland
  2. Santiallana del Mar, Cantabria, Spain
  3. Pérouges, Rhone, France
  4. Tallinn, Estonia
  5. Olliergues, Auvergne, France
  6. Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert, Occitanie, France

 

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Chateau des Adhémar, France

Chateau des Adhémar, Montélimar, France

Chateau des Adhémar, Montélimar, France

The 12th century Chateau des Adhémar remains one of the last true examples of Romanesque architecture, a style defined by rounded arches, thick walls, squat towers and sturdy pillars. This study, box-like castle was built atop a sunburnt hill which overlooks the orange-tiled, sunny town of Montélimar (located in the Drôme department in the south of France). Appropriated by the papacy in the 14th century until 1447 when it re-entered the Kingdom of France, the castle has been used as papal residence, an armament for several conflicts and wars, a citadel, a prison, a country residence, and now a contemporary art museum. In fact, Chateau des Adhémar was largely saved in the last few centuries as it was put to use as a prison. The famed loggia, or loge, with the striped design and rounded windows attached to the main keep was added during the Renaissance to ‘beautify’ what was considered a ‘plain’ Romanesque design. The beautiful Renaissance loggia was also built to add light to formerly gloomy rooms as well as show off the expansive countryside on Chateau des Adhémar’s toes. Located in the inner courtyard is the ancient 11th century St Pierre Chapel. Once a part of the wide-reaching monastic network centred at the Monastery of Ile Barbe in Lyon, the simple Romanesque chapel was later incorporated into the castle complex by the powerful Adhémar family. Today, the castle is a fine example of Romanesque and Renaissance architecture, as well as the modern art movement. It offers splendid aerial views of Montélimar and is a perfect stop on a road trip heading from Lyon to Nimes, Avignon, Montpellier or any other destinations in Southern France!


See Other Fascinating Places in the South of France
  1. The medieval village St Guilhem le Desert
  2. The famous Roman Aqueduct, the Pont du Gard
  3. The Nimes Arena
  4. Balazuc village in Ardeche
  5. Largentiere village in Ardeche
  6. The ancient citadel of Carcassonne

 

Papel Palace & Pont d’Avignon, France

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Sur le Pont d’Avignon, France (On the Avignon Bridge, France)

Another day, another bridge. In contrast to the super-sleek, ultra-design Zubri Zuri Bridge in Bilbao, the Pont d’Avignon is one of the world’s most famous traditional, historic bridges – not unlike Prague’s Charles Bridge. The Pont d’Avignon is famous largely because of the classic French nursery song about it (Sur le Pont d’Avignon/On y danse, On y danse/Sur le Pont d’Avignon/On y danse tous en rond) – even though the song is wrong. It’s unlikely people ever danced ‘sur’ (on) the bridge; lacking for space, it’s far more likely that they danced underneath…Today the bridge only crosses half the Rhone River, the rest having been washed away (learn more about the Pont d’Avignon’s history here). Rising majestically behind the broken bridge is the Palais des Papes – the Papel Palace – which was the seat of 6 ‘rebel’ popes in the 14th century. During the Avignon Papacy, in 1305 the Palais became the papal residence when French Pope Clement V elected to move the papal centre of authority to Avignon in an effort to avoid facing the chaos in Rome (in all fairness, I’d be inclined to think the same thing…the Eternal City is eternally chaotic). Though succeeding in centralising power and church regulations, the Avignon Papacy also succeeded in consuming most the papacy’s purse by constructing this overwhelmingly extravagant Palais des Papes. Today, this magnificent UNESCO World Heritage Site is one of the largest and most important constructions in the Gothic style in Europe – with its massive halls, extensive dining rooms, glamorous bedrooms and beautiful chapels, it’s easy to why. You can buy a combined ticket in order to visit both sites. For a nice aerial view, climb up the hill Rocher des Domes afterwards.


Find More Amazing European Gothic Architecture Here
  1. Beautiful Gothic city centre of Prague, Czech Republic
  2. Barcelona’s infamous Barrio Gótico, Spain
  3. The incredible Gothic Revival of the Hohenzollern Castle, Germany
  4. Strasbourg’s oldest (and most Gothic) building: Maison Kammerzell, France
  5. Neo-Gothic revival, Vajahunyad Castle in Budapest, Hungary

 

Nimes Canals, France

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The Canals of Nîmes, France

The Roman city of Nîmes has been a splendid city in the south of France for thousands of years. Known for its chic boutiques, terrific Roman ruins (including the amazing Roman Arena), and mild Mediterranean climate, Nîmes has long been regarded as one of France’s most beautiful cities – and best-kept secrets of France’s Languedoc-Roussillon/Midi-Pyrenees region. But not all of Nîmes is ancient. The Romans built a spring (the Spring of Nemo) and decorated it with a temple (now gone). But in the 1700s, the growing city needed a better source of safe drinking water, and therefore opted to construct a network of canals. Ulterior motives included powering Nîmes’ mills to sustain its’ top-ranking position in the textile industry as well as the indigo dying industry for a new product, serge de Nîmes, better known today as denim (from the French, ‘de’ or ‘from’ Nîmes; indeed, thank Nîmes for your jeans!). The project became a grand affair, and included a beautiful park laced with ornate statues, exotic gardens, and of course, the wide, boulevardesque canals. They were the first gardens in France created for the benefit of the public, not royalty. Today’s visitors to Nîmes who wander the park and the canals will still feel the glamour and elegance that exudes off these complex and orate 18th century creations, so important to the Nîmois. 


More Beautiful Canals in Europe
  1. Bruges, Belgium
  2. Ghent, Belgium
  3. Annecy, France
  4. Strasbourg, France
  5. Copenhagen, Denmark
  6. Amsterdam, Netherlands
  7. Bath, England

 

Balazuc, Ardeche, France

Balazuc - Gorges d'Ardeche - southern France

Sunset over Balazuc in the Ardèche region, France

Sunset cascades over the little medieval village tucked into the heart of the Gorges de l’Ardèche, nicknamed by the locals the ‘European Grand Canyon.’ The 30-km long canyon runs from the tourist hotspot Vallon-Pont-d’Arc to the less-well-known Saint-Martin-d’Ardèche. The village of Balazuc is listed on the ‘Most Beautiful Villages in France (along with Pérouges and St Guilhiem-le-Désert) – as it should be. The village hugs the edge of the steep hill as narrow medieval alleyways weave and climb the hill’s slope from the shores of Ardèche River up to Balazuc’s castle. Cobblestone alleys meander through ancient dwellings, passing through echoing tunnels, climbing up uneven staircases. Well-worn steps lead up to the top of some of Balazuc’s buildings, affording breathtaking views over the clay roofs, the Ardèche River, and the Gorges themselves. In Balazuc, it’s easy to peel away the centuries to another era – all the while enjoying the creature comforts of our own!


Find More Beautiful French Villages
  1. Perouges
  2. Largentiere
  3. St Guilheim le Desert
  4. St Nectaire
  5. Megeve

 

Grotte des Demoiselles, France

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Grotte des Demoiselles, France

It’s been a long time ; I apologize. Between doing my masters degree in a foreign language, managing both an internship and a job, getting a French civil union with my boyfriend, adopting a puppy, travelling Europe, and generally enjoying life in France, I’ve been busy to say the least. But I’ve returned, and I’m going to attempt to keep up my photo-a-day concept whenever possible! I’d like to start off with place in my adopted country, France: the Grotte des Demoiselles. France actually has quite a lot of caves – over 200! Some are more famous than others (ahem Lascaux ahem), but all of them are beautiful. This cave is located in the south, in the region of Languedoc-Roussillon. Stalagmites and stalactites fall from the ceilings and rise from the floor, creating magnificent “rooms” that look like Gaudi made them (though the colours here are artificial).  Like a lobster trap, getting in is easy, out more difficult – in one hidden corner there is the outline of a cave bear skeleton who spent his last days here. The main room, or the Cathedral, is 52 meters from floor to ceiling. With impressive acoustics resulting from the size of the room, at the bottom of the man-made staircase is a stalactite in the form of the Mother-and-Child beckoning to any adventurer who descends to the bottom, and a nature-made organ pipe plays its song. And keep an eye out for the fairies – legend has it that the “desmoiselles” (‘maidens’ in French) who gave the cave its name were in fact fairies residing inside, and even make it a habit to occasionally save wayward travellers!

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Pont d’Avignon, France

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Pont d’Avignon, France

The famous song “Sur le Pont d’Avignon” (On the Bridge of Avignon) immortalises the Saint Bénézet Bridge or more commonly known as le Pont d’Avignon, today a UNESCO site. In fact – this broken bridge. Because as famous as this bridge is, it can’t actually get you across the Rhone River. The bridge was built because the Ardèche shepherd, Bénézet had a vision that God wanted a bridge here, and when no one believed him, he threw a boulder to convince. Well, in 1185 they built the bridge alright – but apparently either the saint was wrong or God didn’t actually want the bridge because in 1226 it was destroyed by war, and then every century or so it was carried away by the Rhone River. By the 17th century, they gave it up to ruin. As for the 15th century song, it evokes images of townspeople dancing on the bridge – but as you can see, it’s not such a big place for a festival. It’s much more likely that in the original version, they would’ve danced sous or UNDER the bridge!

Sur le Pont d’Avignon
L’on y danse, l’on y danse
Sur le Pont d’Avignon
L’on y danse tous en rond

On the bridge of Avignon
We all dance there, we all dance there
On the bridge of Avignon
We all dance there in a ring


Other bridges in Europe
  1. Tower Bridge in London, England
  2. Millennium Bridge in London, England
  3. Liberty Bridge in Budapest, Hungary
  4. Chain Bridge in Budapest, Hungary
  5. Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic
  6. Pont du Gard in Southern France

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